Print Page | Close Window

Tips for Listing Candidate Causes

Listing candidate causes requires balancing two issues. If you include every possible stressor the causal analysis will be burdensome, but being selective in this step may eliminate the true cause. There are no rigorous rules for balancing those concerns, but the following are some suggested rules of thumb for listing candidate causes.

For Including Candidate Causes

Do:

For Excluding Candidate Causes

Do:

Don't:

Consider a Second Tier List

If you have evidence against a stressor but it is not convincing, it is often better to list it is as a low priority for analysis than to not list it at all. That increases transparency and may remind you of other possibilities if the results of the causal analysis are weak or ambiguous. Such a list of potential but unanalyzed candidate causes also might include stressors for which there are no data.

References

U.S. EPA (2006) Mid-Atlantic Integrated Assessment (MAIA). State of the Flow Waters Report. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, Washington DC. EPA/620/R-06/001.

Print Page | Close Window