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2008 Climate Award Winners

Corporate and Governmental Award Winners
Advanced Micro Devices
The City of Albuquerque, New Mexico
Austin Energy
MEGTEC Systems
Xerox Corporation

Team Award Winners
Climate Protection Team of Durwood Zaelke & Scott Stone
Life Cycle Analysis Team of Dr. Stella Papasavva & William R. Hill

Individual Award Winners
Gay Browne
Laurie David
Kenneth Davis
Marco Gonzalez
Laura Miller
John Morrill
Romina Picolotti

Lifetime Achievement Award
Dr. Rajendra K. Pachauri


Corporate and Governmental Award Winners

Advanced Micro Devices
Advanced Micro Devices, Inc., (AMD), a global microprocessor manufacturer and charter member of the US EPA Climate Leaders partnership, reduced its global greenhouse gas emissions by 53 percent per manufacturing index (unit of production) from 2002 to 2006. AMD cut its emissions by increasing energy efficiency and reducing perfluorocompound (PFC) emissions. The company applied best practices in new production facility construction, selecting high-efficiency heating, ventilation, and air conditioning equipment. AMD also partnered with tri-generation facilities to recover waste heat from electricity production, using it to generate heat and cooling for wafer fabrication operations. AMD decreased its 2006 PFC emissions 98% compared to 1995 levels by implementing alternative chemistries, optimizing manufacturing processes, and abating process effluents. AMD has been a leader in the reduction of PFC emissions associated with wafer fabrication, being among the first businesses to join the EPA's voluntary PFC Reduction Partnership for the Semiconductor Industry in 1996. AMD's new wafer fabrication facilities only utilize low PFC emitting process technology.

In addition to reducing its own greenhouse gas emissions, AMD designs energy efficiency features into its products to help others minimize their energy-consumption greenhouse gas emissions. AMD PowerNow! technology with Optimized Power Management enhances the performance-per-watt capabilities of the AMD OpteronTM processor by adjusting performance based on CPU need. This reduces electricity consumption, resulting in cooler and quieter computers that also reduce idle CPU power consumption up to 75%.

AMD has published its annual Global Climate Protection Plan since 2001. The company is continuing its climate commitment by setting a second Climate Leaders goal to reduce global GHG emissions another 33 percent per manufacturing index by 2010.

Albuquerque, New Mexico
Since 1990, the City of Albuquerque has reduced greenhouse gas emissions from city operations by 58% and from city landfills by 73%. Albuquerque achieved First Place Honors from the U.S. Conference of Mayors' 2007 Climate Protection Awards. Albuquerque achieved these impressive reductions by increasing energy efficiency, implementing renewable energy projects, capturing landfill methane, and utilizing alternative fuels. 20% of the City's energy is derived from wind power; the City fleet ranks fourth in the nation on SustainLane's 2006 list of the 50 largest US cities whose city fleets use alternative fuels; five city swimming pools are installing solar heating systems; and the city landfill converts landfill gas into energy. Albuquerque established the nation's first municipal capital budget set-a-side specifically dedicated to energy reduction and renewable energy implementation. The City is currently working to reduce emissions even further: The City's new Energy Conservation Code requires new buildings and existing buildings undergoing significant alterations to be at least 30% more energy efficient, and Mayor Chavez recently issued an Executive Order ensuring that all new municipal buildings meet green building standards, and established a special forestry program to combat climate change by reducing the heat island effect, sequestering carbon dioxide, and buffering the effects of rapid climate change.

Austin Energy
Austin Energy (AE), the 10th largest public power utility in the United States, is nationally recognized for its dedication to climate protection. Over the last twenty five years, AE's energy efficiency and conservation programs have saved more electricity than the annual output of a 500 megawatt power plant. Through energy conservation and efficiency, AE has been able to forego new plant construction, close one plant, and help keep consumer energy bills low. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the US DoE named AE an ENERGY STAR partner of the year in 2005 and 2006, recognizing AE's Home Performance ENERGY STAR program as one of the best in the nation. In 2006 alone, over 5,000 Austin residents participated in the Home Performance program which avoided emissions of more than 4,500 tons of CO2 and 4 tons of nitrogen oxides and collectively reduced energy use annually by 7.8 million kilowatt-hours. The EPA also recognized AE for its Combined Heating and Power Partnership for the Mueller Energy Center.

AE supports green power, green building, and green vehicles as well. AE's GreenChoice program has been the top utility-sponsored green power sales program in America five years in a row, providing more than 580 million kilowatt-hours in 2006. AE offers its customers one of the most competitive photovoltaic rebates in the country, at $4.50 a watt. This pays for approximately 45% to 75% of the cost of installing a solar system. AE's award winning Green Building Program reduced peak energy demand. In a typical year, this program reduces the amount of CO2 from the air as planting 17,900 trees and the same amount of nitrous oxides as removing 870 vehicles from the roadways. AE also supports the Plug in Partners Campaign promoting plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, and is working to demonstrate a Toyota Prius that achieves 100 miles per gallon. By 2020, AE is on track to offset the need for a 700 megawatt power plant through energy efficiency and load shifting initiatives, provide 30% of its generation portfolio with renewable energy, and achieve 100 megawatts of solar power.

MEGTEC Systems
MEGTEC Systems, a global industrial machinery supplier, developed an innovative technology to capture and recover energy from the dilute methane emitted from coal mine ventilation shafts. Their technology is currently the world's only commercially-viable technology to abate these emissions. Coal mines are a significant source of methane, which is over 20 times more potent than carbon dioxide at trapping heat in the atmosphere. Worldwide, coal mining activities release about 8% of all anthropogenic methane emissions; underground coal mine ventilation shafts emit more than 50 percent of coal mining-related methane emissions. In 2000, coal mine ventilation shafts produced an estimated 16.6 billion cubic meters of methane globally, equivalent to 237 million tons of CO2. Typically, methane concentrations in mine ventilation shafts are very dilute (less than 1%), posing a challenge to design technically and economically viable systems to convert this greenhouse gas to usable energy. MEGTEC's ground-breaking technology, the VOCSIDIZER, works by using a thermal oxidation system that destroys methane in ventilation air by heating and converting it to carbon dioxide and water. The heat generated in the process can be used directly in mining operations such as coal drying or to generate electricity. The technology is currently in use at BHP Billiton's West Cliff Colliery (Australia), the world's first ever power plant run on coal mine ventilation air methane ("VAM"). The MEGTEC technology makes it possible to utilize a fuel consisting of approx 99% air and less than 1% methane in the production of high grade steam, suitable for driving a conventional steam turbine generating, generating electricity. The installation at the West Cliff colliery processes only around 1/5 of the ventilation air available from the shaft. Yet the energy recovered is driving a turbine of 6 megawatts of electricity-enough electricity to power about 5,000 US households-and reduces annual greenhouse emissions by the equivalent of 250,000 tonnes of CO2. Additional projects are underway in Australia, in China, in Europe and in the United States.

Xerox Corporation
Xerox Corporation reduced its total global greenhouse gas emissions by 18 percent from 2002 to 2006. Xerox joined the US EPA Climate Leaders partnership in 2003 and soon set an aggressive goal to reduce its global greenhouse gas emissions 10% from 2002 levels by 2012. Xerox surpassed its goal several years early by developing a clear framework for greenhouse gas management--Energy Challenge 2012--and involving the entire company in meeting the goal. Xerox established clear roles and accountability, engaged the full value chain, integrated climate protection into core business strategies and practices, allocated appropriate funding, and rewarded success.

"Long before it was popular to do so, Xerox ranked sustainability high on its list of priorities and led the industry in innovative ways to reduce waste and conserve energy. This deep knowledge, along with our well-defined processes, contributed to our success in exceeding GHG reduction targets six years ahead of our goal," said Patricia Calkins, vice president, Environment, Health and Safety for Xerox. "Our long-term experience has shown us that when we act in ways that benefit the environment, we make sound business decisions that not only benefit Xerox but also our customers and shareholders."

Despite such a significant achievement in greenhouse gas reductions, Xerox is not slowing down its efforts to address its emissions. With the help of EPA Climate Leaders, Xerox set a new goal to reduce global GHG emissions by 25% from 2002 to 2012.

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Team Award Winners

Durwood Zaelke and Scott Stone
Durwood Zaelke and Scott Stone were the driving force behind the Institute for Governance and Sustainable Development's campaign to strengthen the Montreal Protocol in a way that maximizes its climate benefits. Their efforts, as well as the efforts and contributions of the many other experts and delegates with whom they worked, raised awareness of the threats from the rising use of hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) in developing countries and played a key role in last year's historic agreement under the Montreal Protocol to accelerate the phaseout of HCFCs. Because HCFCs are potent global warming agents, the new control measures also will result in significant greenhouse gas emissions reductions. The U.S. EPA estimates that, through 2040, the HCFC agreement could reduce emissions by up to 16 billion metric tonnes of carbon dioxide-equivalent. This is equal to the greenhouse gas emissions from the electricity use of more than 70 million U.S. households over the next 30 years.

The Life Cycle Analysis Team of Stella Papasavva and William R. Hill
Solving climate change requires complex technological solutions. To understand the true, cradle-to-cradle, global warming impacts of a particular technology, it is not enough to calculate only its direct greenhouse gas emissions; one must also factor in the greenhouse gas emissions associated with its production, mass, shipment, installation, operation, and end of life recycling or disposal. Combined,these impacts are known as a technology's "life cycle climate performance (LCCP)." Once the life-cycle climate performance of all alternative solutions is known, it is possible to pick the best solution for the climate. This is an incredibly difficult task to accomplish, but Stella Papasavva and William Hill have gone beyond the call of duty to develop this analysis for vehicle air conditioning systems. Vehicle air conditioning (known in the industry as mobile air conditioning, or (MAC) account for 6% to 20% of additional vehicle fuel use worldwide and are responsible for over half of the world's HFC-134a emissions. HFC-134a is a greenhouse gas 1,430 times stronger than carbon dioxide. Automakers are trying to decide on new refrigerants with direct global warming potential (GWP) less than 150. Although there are several alternative refrigerant solutions that meet this requirement the challenge is to develop new MAC technologies with the lowest LCCP climate impacts. Past efforts to compare alternative MAC systems, based on LCCP, have been thwarted by the lack of a single, globally accepted method to calculate MAC greenhouse gas emissions. Different researchers used different assumptions and methodologies, resulting in a wide variation in calculations. To enable an "apples-to-apples" comparison, Stella Papasavva and William Hill from General Motors led an international team with members from the Japanese Automobile Manufacturers Association, the Society of Automotive Engineers, German VDA, Latin OEM's, and the US Environmental Protection Agency to develop a common methodology to calculate the life-cycle climate performance of MACs with different refrigerants. The effort was successful: The Global Refrigerants Energy & Environmental Mobile Air Conditioning Lifecycle Climate Change Performance (GREEN-MAC-LCCP)© model is now available from the partnership and is online (http://www.epa.gov/cppd/mac) in cooperation with the United Nations Environment Programme Division of Technology, Industry, and Economics (DTIE). This tool lets stakeholders compare choices in a transparent manner. It is globally peer reviewed and globally accepted, and is now the gold standard in LCCP credibility.

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Individual Award Winners

Gay Browne
Gay Browne is a concerned citizen who took 'going green' into her own hands by living what she preaches and empowering others to do the same. A lifelong asthmatic, Gay began to search for ways to improve her environment and take better care of herself and her three children. She started from the inside out, choosing all natural alternatives for everything from nutritional habits to bed sheets. In 1994, Gay built the first green home in her Los Angeles' Pacific Palisades community. In her experience with researching and working with green home developers, interior designers and furniture dealers, she realized that there was a wealth of green options, some better than others\but no simple resource to find them. In response, Gay developed Greenopia: the urban dweller's guide to green living to provide a resource to help people like herself make choices to protect the climate and green their lives on a daily basis. Greenopia provides consumers with an easy-to-use, independent resource for where to find a wide range of local green businesses, services and organizations for metropolitan cities to help them reduce their environmental footprint, including greenhouse gas emissions. The guide allows consumers to think global but act local by voting with their dollars. She regularly speaks at environmental conferences on how consumers can go green and is also a contributing environmental writer for LA Confidential, Forbes Online, Voices at iVillage.com and many more.

Laurie David
Laurie David is an activist devoted to stopping climate change. She uses mainstream media and grassroots movements to educate the general public about the need to protect the earth's climate. As a trustee of the Natural Resources Defense Council and a founding member of the Detroit Project, Ms. David spear-headed numerous public education and action campaigns advocating higher fuel efficiency standards. She is an outspoken promoter of hybrid vehicles, and with the Detroit Project, she produced several television commercials that helped ignite a national debate about the negative impacts of gas-guzzling SUVs. David also founded the Stop Global Warming Virtual March with Senator John McCain and Robert F. Kennedy, Jr.. This campaign has engaged religious leaders, labor unions, elected officials, business leaders, and every day Americans in the fight to stop climate change. As a producer, Ms. First brought the issue of global warming into the mainstream with the comedy special, Earth to America! for TBS, which aired November 20, 2005 to millions of viewers. The show featured Tom Hanks, Will Ferrell, Steve Martin and Jack Black and was the first cause-oriented primetime special in a decade. The show garnered rave reviews and sparked hundreds of TV, print and radio stories about global warming. Ms. David is also a producer of An Inconvenient Truth, the Academy Award-winning documentary featuring Al Gore, and the HBO documentary Too Hot Not to Handle that aired on HBO April 22, 2006. Thanks to Ms. David's efforts, the public is now better informed about the earth's climate, and better equipped to protect it.

Kenneth Davis
Kenneth Davis took action to protect the climate by harnessing the wind resources of the Wyoming high plains. Davis' leadership resulted in the first Air Force wind turbine generator installation in the continental United States and the only application of current generation wind technology on a federal installation. The 660 kilowatt grid-connected turbines generate enough electricity to power more than 500 households. The installation reduced the base electrical consumption by more than 3 million kilowatt-hours in FY 2006. The Air Force estimates the wind turbines will displace more than 134 million pounds of greenhouse gases over the next 20 years, equivalent to avoiding driving 161 million miles on the roads of the Rocky Mountain Region. Mr. Davis directed every stage of project development, from obtaining wind resource data to verifying the viability of wind power generation to securing design and construction funding to turbine and site selection.

Marco Gonzalez
Marco Gonzalez, the Executive Secretary of the Ozone Secretariat, is a true environmental hero: already a recipient of the US EPA, Ozone Protection Award, he has most recently distinguished himself by helping to strengthen the Montreal Protocol to protect the Climate. Recent scientific work has shown that the Montreal Protocol eliminates emissions equivalent to 11 billion tons of carbon dioxide-equivalent per year, which is roughly 5-6 times the emissions reductions required during the first commitment period of the Kyoto Protocol. In terms of radiative forcing, this is delaying climate change by 7-12 years. Scientists concluded that strengthening the Montreal Protocol could also protect the climate if energy-efficient, climate-friendly alternatives were selected. Gonzalez convened formal and informal meetings with key experts and country representatives to stress the significance of these findings for climate protection. He frequently and tirelessly noted that accelerating the phase-out of HCFCs would not only ensure protection of the ozone layer, but would also help mitigate global warming with the selection of the right alternatives. These efforts were successful: in September of 2007, the Parties to the Montreal Protocol agreed to accelerate the phase-out of HCFCs, and replace them with chemicals and technologies that are safe for the ozone layer and have lower global warming potentials. This agreement was hailed by the United Nations as a historic step and a "big boost" in the fight against climate change.

Laura Miller
City of Dallas Mayor Laura Miller, through sheer determination and organizational and persuasive leadership, led a group of Mayors representing 36 Texas cities, counties and school districts to form the Texas Clean Air Cities Coalition (TCACC) that successfully protested the approval of 17 new coal-fired power plants that would have added well over one hundred million tons of CO2 to the atmosphere each year. Mayor Miller and the Coalition challenged the approval of the additional coal plants in order to preserve Texas air quality, keep the areas of Waco, Austin and East Texas from going into non-attainment, and to lower carbon emissions. In particular, the TCACC intervened against TXU's eight proposed coal units across Texas that would have added 30,000 tons of nitrogen oxides, over 115 million tons of CO2, and nearly 4,000 pounds of toxic mercury each year. Due to the Coalition's efforts, the Administrative Judges allowed discovery regarding carbon dioxide emissions and climate change. This ruling presented the first of its kind during Texas permitting processes. TXU subsequently cancelled the construction of all eight of its plants. Miller, a former journalist who served as Mayor from 2002 to 2007, is now working as Director of Projects Texas with Colorado-based Summit Power to build the first commercially viable IGCC (Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle) power plant with CCS (Carbon Capture and Sequestration) in the United States.

John H. Morrill
Arlington County, Virginia, is a recognized leader in local efforts to protect the climate and John Morrill is a driving force behind the County's success. Beyond ably filling his role as an innovative Energy Manager, Mr. Morrill is a thoughtful, responsive resource for other local, regional and federal governments establishing their own programs.

John Morrill is the staff coordinator of the Arlington Initiative to Reduce Emissions (AIRE), a climate action campaign to cut greenhouse gas emissions 10% from 2000 to 2012. Arlington is lowering emissions from government operations through an integrated suite of policies and programs, including: increased energy efficiency in buildings and infrastructure; alternative fuels and high-efficiency vehicles; purchase of green power; restoring its urban tree canopy; and renewed focus on recycling materials. However, local government operations are less than 4% of the total GHG emissions in the county.

Therefore, Arlington encourages and recognizes GHG emissions reductions in the private sector by encouraging businesses to partner with AIRE and the programs it leverages, such as ENERGY STAR, the EPA's Green Power Partnership, Arlington's own award-winning commuter services, and the LEED™ green building program. The County also offers free small business energy audits, and reaches out to residents by offering home energy audits, free compact fluorescent lights, and a popular series of educational workshops each year. In 2007 the AIRE program was institutionalized through a new county funding stream dedicated to climate action.

In addition to his technical duties as Energy Manager, Morrill does a tremendous amount of outreach; he is incredibly generous with his time by responding to questions from local governments in the region and across the nation, speaking at climate change conferences organized by a variety of organizations, and sharing what Arlington County has learned.

Romina Picolotti
Romina Picolotti, Argentina's Secretary of Environment, demonstrated extraordinary commitment, vision and leadership on climate change by advocating fast, early action to cut greenhouse gas emissions resulting from continued use of ozone-depleting HCFCs. Under Secretary Picolotti's leadership, Argentina advanced one of the strongest proposals to accelerate the phase-out of HCFCs under the Montreal Protocol in order to maximize the ozone treaty's climate protection potential. In the days leading up to the 20th Anniversary Meeting of the Parties of the Montreal Protocol and during the Meeting itself, Secretary Picolotti worked behind the scenes to galvanize wide-spread global support and dissuade sceptics. Secretary Picolotti stood firm during the international negotiations and successfully secured a proposal that included explicit language designed to broaden the treaty's reach to include benefits related to climate change. By mandating that HCFCs be replaced with climate-friendly substitutes and technologies, the final proposal ensured the elimination of HCFCs in a way that would not harm the climate, but instead avoid further greenhouse gas emissions.

Her efforts and enthusiasm helped ensure that the Parties did not miss the opportunity to address Climate Change. With Argentina leading the way, countries reached the historic agreement to accelerate the HCFC phase-out, cutting GHG emissions by 4 times what is expected under the Kyoto Protocol. The success of this initiative spearheaded by Secretary Picolotti and supported by many other countries, has bought the world some valuable time to advance broader climate solutions, but more importantly, shows that countries can effectively collaborate to reach global solutions to our most difficult yet common environmental challenges.

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Lifetime Achievement Award

Dr. Rajendra K. Pachauri
Dr. Pachauri is an engineer, economist, professor, manager, scholar, and most importantly, a leader in the fight against climate change. Dr. Rajendra Pachauri started his distinguished career as an economist and engineer working to improve the fuel efficiency of locomotives and other fuel-using equipment manufactured in India. In 1981, he became Director of Tata Energy Research Institute (TERI). Under his leadership, TERI has become a world-class technical and policy institute with significant global contributions in energy, environment, forestry, biotechnology, and the conservation of natural resources. His expertise and good judgment was widely recognized and reflected in appointments to serve as a director of the Indian Oil Corporation (1999-2002) and the Institute for Global Environmental Strategies (IGES) in Japan (1999), a member of the Economic Advisory Council to the Prime Minister of India (2001), and a visiting faculty member at the Yale of School of Forestry and Environmental Studies (2000). In April 2002, Dr. Pachauri was elected Chairman of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and has served during its most critical years when work earning the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize was accomplished.

He has earned the EPA Climate Protection Award for lifetime achievement in energy efficiency and climate protection. Dr. Pachauri has been the scientific voice of research and reason and has been an effective advocate and symbol for the participation of developing country scientists in the international climate protection process. He has been the planning voice of assessment and deliberation, and he has been the diplomatic voice of starting and strengthening the Kyoto Protocol. With his hands, he has redesigned machines for energy efficiency. With his intellect, he has visualized a better world and worked toward that goal, adding flesh and bones to the skeletal idea of "sustainable development". With his heart, he has organized and managed vast teams of voluntary IPCC experts to accomplish the IPCC assessment reports; the findings of which unequivocally confirm that human activities are changing the climate and that technical solutions are available to halt and reverse increasing greenhouse gas emissions.

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