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Project Specific Scorecards

Introduction | Municipal Level Scorecards | Project Specific Scorecards | Component Scorecards | Additional Resources

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Project specific assessments:

  1. Smart Scorecard for Development Projects
  2. Mobile, Ala. Smart Growth Criteria Matrix
  3. New Jersey Future Smart Growth Scorecard: Proposed Development
  4. Maryland Smart Growth Scorecard
  5. Austin, Texas Smart Growth Matrix
  6. TND Design Rating System
  7. City of New Westminster, British Columbia
  8. Charlotte, N.C. Sustainability Index

1. Smart Scorecard for Development Projects (PDF) (27 pp, 79 K)
Year: 2002
Will Fleissig and Vickie Jacobsen, The Congress for the New Urbanism: Reports Link to EPA's External Link Disclaimer

This is a tool that helps decision makers, municipal planners and staff, neighborhood organizations, and developers determine whether or not a specific project is fulfilling a community's smart growth goals. It is comprehensive, thorough, and technical, yet also flexible enough to be adapted and revised according to the specific needs of a community. It is also a quality-learning tool and should help communities begin to use concepts that add to positive discussions about how and where to grow next.

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2. Smart Growth Criteria Matrix (PDF) (8 pp, 22 K)
City of Mobile Planning Department:Urban Development Link to EPA's External Link Disclaimer

This is a project specific assessment tool developed by the planning department in Mobile, AL. It is used to rate specific development projects according to a set of smart growth criteria adopted by Mobile. It's a tool that can be used by developers as they are putting together a proposal - a process specific self-rating tool - and by city staff once a proposal is submitted.

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3. Smart Growth Scorecard: Proposed Development (PDF) (4 pp, 433 K)
Year: 2002
New Jersey Future: Scorecards Link to EPA's External Link Disclaimer

This is a project specific assessment tool. It is used to rate development proposals based on general smart growth criteria put forward by New Jersey Future. The questions are arranged in categories that include proximity to existing development and infrastructure, walkability, housing options, mobility, and open space protection. It's useful for a range of projects, but particularly useful for larger projects.

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4. Maryland Smart Growth Scorecard (PDF) (3 pp, 14 K)
Year: 2002
Maryland Office of Smart Growth Link to EPA's External Link Disclaimer

An assessment tool used to identify the smart growth attributes of specific development projects. The Smart Growth Scorecard was developed in coordination with numerous State agencies and went through an informal peer review with the private sector and local governments.

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5. Smart Growth Matrix (PDF) (3 pp, 27 K)
Year: 2001
Transportation, Planning, and Design Department, Austin, TX Link to EPA's External Link Disclaimer

This is an assessment tool used to determine the smart growth attributes of a specific development projects. City of Austin staff use the tool to evaluate the quality of the development within the context of smart growth criteria. Projects that significantly advance the smart growth goals are eligible for project incentives.

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6. TND Design Rating System, Version 2.2 (PDF) (20 pp, 274 K)
Year:2005
Laurence Aurbach, The Town Paper Link to EPA's External Link Disclaimer

This is a comprehensive, project level assessment tool. This rating system is carefully constructed to function alone. It's also meant to rate development projects in a range of places and make comparisons between proposed development projects. Unlike some of the other project level assessment tools, this is a comprehensive learning tool as well. It teaches an applicant (developer) or municipal staff the tenets of traditional neighborhood development (TND). The rating system consists of ten categories ranging from "housing choice" to "civic space." Each category has a definition, a method section for collecting the data needed to rate the category, and a scoring system. The separated rating system is quite useful because different communities will be able to decide which of the components are most important and most reflective of a community's values.

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7. Smart Growth Development Checklist (PDF) (8 pp, 49 K)
Year: 2004
City of New Westminster, BC: Planning Link to EPA's External Link Disclaimer

This is an assessment tool for proposed development projects. New Westminster developed this tool by adapting the New Jersey Future scorecard for proposed developments. The scorecard rates projects in six broad sustainability categories - accessibility, housing choice, efficient use of public funds, protect open space and natural areas, placemaking, and shorter commutes and more transportation choices. The scorecard enables the applicants (developers) to enter into quality discussions with city staff about proposed developments. It is also a good example of how a community adapted another scorecard to fit its own needs. Communities interested in taking one of the model scorecards in this document and adapting it to their own needs would do well to review this scorecard in relation to the New Jersey future proposed development scorecard.

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8. Charlotte, NC Sustainability Index (PDF) (5 pp, 52 K)
Year: 2005
City of Charlotte Economic Development Link to EPA's External Link Disclaimer

A checklist for evaluating land development and redevelopment projects that have requested City participation in Transit Corridor, Business District and Neighborhood Infill Areas. The Sustainability Index is a bit broader than some of the other project level tools. It rates the project in these additional categories: Council's strategic priorities such as health neighborhoods, the efficient use of public funds, community safety and prosperity; smart growth principles; and financial need, risk, and return. The Charlotte Sustainability Index will be most useful to communities interested in seeing development and redevelopment projects support a community's state policy goals.

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