Jump to main content or area navigation.

Contact Us

EPA's Region 6 Office

Serving: Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Texas, and 66 Tribal Nations

Office of Planning and Coordination

The Compliance Assurance and Enforcement Division's Office of Planning and Coordination is comprised of a variety of activities that have multi-media or cross-program focus, such as Risk Assessment Tools, National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) compliance and review of Environmental Impact Statements and Assessments.

NEPA
The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) established Federal policy, goals, and procedures for the protection, maintenance and enhancement of the U.S. environment. Click one of the NEPA Topics of Interests below for more information:

more infoNew Source Review

more infoSpecial Appropriations

more infoCAA 309

more infoNEPA Documents


Risk Assessment/Spatial Tools
The Risk Assessment Program staff evaluates many environmental problems as to their impacts upon the human health, ecology, economics, and social-cultural welfare of defined areas. Click one of the Risk Assessment/Geospatial Tools Topics of interests below for more information:

more infoNEPAssist

more infoGISST

more infoRAIMI


NEPA Topics of Interest

Section 309 of the Clean Air Act
The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has general statutory authority under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969  and the Council on Environmental Quality’s implementing regulations, and has specific authority and responsibility under Section 309 of the Clean Air Act to conduct reviews, comment in writing, and make those comments available to the public.  These responsibilities have been combined into one process known as the “Environmental Review Process”. 

EPA is required to review and publicly comment on the environmental impacts of major Federal actions.  The major elements of the 309 review process are to review and comment on both the adequacy of the analysis and the environmental impacts of the proposed action itself.  The document reviewed by EPA under Section 309 of CAA is the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). The written comments provided by EPA include issues related to all environmental media (i.e., air, water, etc.), methodologies related to media-impact assessment, and areas related to its regulatory responsibilities. EPA also comments on potential violations which are inconsistent with national environmental standards and determines whether adequate information has been provided to assess potential environmental impacts of the proposed action. In general, the degree to which EPA gets involved depends on the level of environmental impacts, the ability and willingness of the proposing Federal agency to mitigate those impacts, and whether EPA is responsible for regulating the type of impact at issue.  EPA Headquarters becomes involved if the Region finds that the proposed action in the draft Environmental EIS is "environmentally unsatisfactory," or that the draft EIS is "inadequate" to assess the potentially significant environmental impacts of proposed actions. The Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) is notified of a draft EIS which has been rated "unsatisfactory" or "inadequate" by EPA.  For more information on EPA Region 6 project, submit inquires to Michael Jansky at jansky.michael@epa.gov.

New Source Determination
The National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit program regulates stormwater discharges into waters of the United States. Section 405 of the Water Quality Act of 1987 (WQA) includes section 402(p) of the Clean Water Act (CWA), which directed the EPA to develop a phased approach to regulate stormwater discharges for industrial activities. EPA published a final regulation on the first phase on this program on November 16, 1990, establishing permit application requirements for “stormwater discharges associated with industrial activity.” This permit is called the Multi-Sector General Permit (MSGP) for Stormwater Discharges Associated with Industrial Sources. The MSGP requires industrial facilities to implement and maintain site-specific stormwater control measures and to develop stormwater pollution prevention plans (SWPPP). The MSGP regulates the discharge of stormwater from an estimated 4,100 industrial facilities in 29 different industrial sectors. Under the MSGP category of Oil and Gas Extraction, three sub-categories within Region 6 require an NPDES General Permit and are subject to new source determinations: General Permit for Oil and Gas Extraction for the Western Portion of the Outer Continental Shelf of the Gulf of Mexico, General Permit for Oil and Gas Extraction Point Source Category to the Territorial Seas off Texas, and General Permit for Discharges from the Oil and Gas Extraction Point Source Category to Coastal Waters in Texas. These General Permits are updated every five years.

40 CFR Section 122.2 defines a new source as “any building, structure, facility, or installation from which there is or may be a discharge of pollutants, the construction of which commenced: (a) after the promulgation of standards of performance under Section 306 of the CWA which are applicable new source performance standards (NSPS), or (b) after the proposal of NSPS in accordance with Section 306 of the CWA which are applicable to such source...” Each industrial sector has a new source date based on regulatory definitions. An applicant must submit information on the proposed construction which must describe the proposed or expanded process and its relationship to the existing facilities. The EPA will use the information to determine if construction will commence after the new source dates and to determine if NSPS apply to the new construction. This New Source Determination (NSD) establishes whether or not the proposed construction is subject to environmental assessment under the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, as amended (NEPA). These regulations and definitions are found in Sections 306 and 511(c) of the CWA and 40 CFR Part 6.

Special Appropriations/Clean Water State Revolving Fund (CWSRF) loan program was authorized by Title VI of the Clean Water Act as amended in 1987. The program is an innovative method of financing a wide range of environmental projects consistent with its primary mission which is to promote water quality nationwide. Under the program, EPA provides "seed money" through capitalization grants requiring a 20 percent match to authorized State water protection agencies to capitalize a CWSRF loan fund. The States make low interest rate loans to selected communities/entities for high priority water quality activities in their area. As the original loan and subsequent interest money is paid back into the revolving fund, additional funding resources become available to fund new projects. Since an SRF project typically costs much less than if it was funded through the bond market, the substantial financial savings is a major benefit for loan recipients. Most projects funded under the CWSRF program involve the construction of waste water treatment facilities. These projects are subject to environmental review and assessment to insure compliance with the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act.

The Drinking Water State Revolving Fund (DWSRF) loan program was authorized by the Safe Drinking Water Act Amendments in 1996. The program is an innovative method of financing a wide range of environmental projects consistent with its primary mission which is to protect and promote drinking water quality nationwide. Under this program, EPA will be providing "seed money" through capitalization grants requiring a 20 percent match to authorized State drinking water protection agencies to capitalize a DWSRF loan program. During fiscal year 1997, the States will be in the process of finalizing legislation to enact their DWSRF. The States will make low interest rate loans to selected communities/entities for high priority drinking water quality activities in their area. As the original loan and subsequent interest money is paid back into the revolving fund, additional funding resources become available to fund new projects. Since an SRF project typically costs much less than if it was funded through the bond market, the substantial financial savings is a major benefit for loan recipients. Most projects funded under the Drinking Water SRF will involve the construction of infrastructure needed to insure that the Nation's drinking water supplies remain safe and affordable, and to protect public health. These projects will be subject to environmental review and assessment to insure compliance with the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act.

For more information please submit all inquires to Don Walker at walker.donald@epa.gov

NEPA Documents
This office holds the contact for all Environmental Impact Statements (EIS's) prepared in the EPA Region 6 Office, which covers that States of Texas, Louisiana, Arkansas, Oklahoma and New Mexico. Each Friday, the Federal Register includes Exit Imagethe "notices of availability" of EIS's completed and issued for that week. Copies of EPA's Region 6 EIS's can be obtained by submitting your e-mail request to jansky.michael@epa.gov.Other NEPA Program publications and reference materials can be found on the NEPA Publications Page.

Risk Assessment/Geospatial Tools Topics of Interest
The GISST is a tool used to assess environmental vulnerabilities and impacts using GIS data and a decision structure. It is a format similar to the HRI and EJ methodologies and was developed in a pilot project beginning in 1996. The method evaluates characteristics such as soil permeability, erosion potential, soil type, landuse-land cover, stream miles, distance to surface water, ground water quality, and rainfall for a determined geographic area. The GISST can evaluate single media and cumulative impacts for environmental assessment projects (e.g., NEPA, compliance assistance, etc.).

NEPAssist
NEPAssist is a ready-to-use application that automates and Web-enables the colletion and coordination of information (e.g., socieoeconomics, air, water, hazardous waste facilities, wetlands, habitat, farmland, roads, schools, etc.) inherent in the environmental review process described by the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). NEPAssist provides a preliminary assessment of a project's potential environmental impacts. It's features and analysis functions can contribute to a streamlined review process that features and analysis functions can contribute to streamlined review processthat potentially raises important environmental issues at the earliest stages of project development. Users can digitize multiple features directly from Web-based imagery. NEPAsist can be accessed internally or extenally. Only internal version lets users access sensitive data and upload GIS shapefiles. Contact Sharon Osowski Morgan, Ph.D at (214) 665-7506 (osowski.sharon@epa.gov).

RAIMI
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Region 6, established the Regional Air Impact Modeling Initiative (RAIMI) to evaluate the potential for health impacts as a result of exposure to multiple contaminants from multiple sources, at a community level of resolution. RAIMI webpage.

The Office of Planning and Coordination mailing address and phone number is:

EPA Region 6
Compliance Assurance and Enforcement Division
Office of Planning and Coordination (6EN-XP)
1445 Ross Avenue
Dallas, Texas 75202-2733

 
Main Office Phone: (214) 665-8150
Fax: (214) 665-7446

Jump to main content.