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Apache County, Arizona

Information provided for informational purposes only

Note: This information is provided for reference purposes only. Although the information provided here was accurate and current when first created, it is now outdated.


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Pesticide Table for the Apache Trout | Pesticide Table for the Little Colorado Spinedace
Pesticide Table for the Navajo Sedge | About the Apache Trout
About the Little Colorado Spinedace | About the Navajo Sedge
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Apache County, Arizona

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Apache Trout

Table of Pesticide Active Ingredients


Soil-incorporated Liquids
Active IngredientCodeTAR*
AZINPHOS-METHYL 3m, 5d  
BENOMYL1m  
CAPTAN1m 
CARBARYL3m 
CARBOFURAN (granular)1990.7
CARBOFURAN (non-granular)1m  
CHLOROTHALONIL (granular)1 
CHLOROTHALONIL (non-granular)1992.8
CHLORPYRIFOS  
Alfalfa
43 
Apples
41 
All Other Uses Except
as a Termitcide
3m, 10 
DIAZINON  
Granular Formulations and
  
Soil-incorporated liquids
2 
Liquids not Soil-incorporated
3m 
DIFLUBENZURON1m 
DIMETHOATE (granular)1 
DIMETHOATE (non-granular)5d, 1992.3
DISULFOTON  
Granular Formulations and
  2
Liquids not Soil-incorporated
3m 
ESFENVALERATE1m, 5d 
FENITROTHION3m 
MALATHION3m, 5D, 10 
MANCOZEB1990.75
METHOMYL1m, 5d 
METHYL PARATHION3m, 5d, 10 
NALED5D, 1992.0
OXYDEMETON-METHYL1992.5
OXYFLUORFEN (granular)1 
OXYFLUORFEN (non-granular)1990.75 
PERMETHRIN1m, 5d 
PHOSMET1m 
PROPACHLOR (granular)2991.3
PROPACHLOR (non-granular)3990.4
PYRETHRINS1m, 5d, 10 
THIOPHANATE-METHYL1m 
TRICHLORFON (granular)2 
TRICHLORFON (non-granular)3993.5

* TAR = Threshold Application Rate (Pounds of active ingredients per acre per application)
CodeLimitations
1Do not apply this pesticide within 20 yards from the edge of water within the shaded area shown on the map for ground applications, nor within 100 yards for aerial applications.
1mWithin the shaded area shown on the map and 1/2 mile up all streams that join the shaded area, do not apply this pesticide within 20 yards from the edge of water for ground applications, nor within 100 yards for aerial applications.
2Do not apply this pesticide within 40 yards from the edge of water within the shaded area shown on the map for ground applications, nor within 200 yards for aerial applications.
3mWithin the shaded area shown on the map and 1/2 mile up all streams that join the shaded area do not apply this pesticide within 100 yards from the edge of water for ground applications, nor within 1/4 mile for aerial applications.
5dDo not apply ultra low volume (ULV) applications within 1 mile from the edge of water within the shaded area shown on the map.
10Do not apply directly to water within the shaded area shown on the map, nor within 1 mile up all streams from the shaded area.
41Do not apply this pesticide within 1/4 mile from the edge of water within the shaded area shown on the map for ground applications, nor within 1/2 mile for aerial applications.
43Do not apply this pesticide within 100 yards from the edge of water within the shaded area shown on the map for ground applications, nor within 1/4 mile for aerial applications.
199Do not apply this pesticide above the threshold application rate (TAR) indicated within 20 yards from the edge of water within the shaded area shown on the map for ground applications, nor within 100 yards for aerial applications.
299Do not apply this pesticide above the threshold application rate (TAR) indicated within 40 yards from the edge of water within the shaded area shown on the map for ground applications, nor within 200 yards for aerial applications.
399Do not apply this pesticide above the threshold application rate (TAR) indicated within 100 yards from the edge of water within the shaded area shown on the map for ground applications, nor within 1/4 mile for aerial applications.

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Little Colorado Spinedace

Table of Pesticide Active Ingredients

Soil-incorporated liquids
Active IngredientCodeTAR*
AZINPHOS-METHYL3m, 5d 
BENOMYL1m 
CAPTAN1m 
CARBARYL3m 
CARBOFURAN (granular)1990.7
CARBOFURAN (non-granular)1m  
CHLOROTHALONIL (granular)1 
CHLOROTHALONIL (non-granular)1992.8
CHLORPYRIFOS  
Alfalfa
43 
Apples
41 
All Other Uses Except
as a Termitcide
3m, 10 
DIAZINON
  
Granular Formulations and
  2
Liquids not Soil-incorporated
3m 
DIFLUBENZURON1m 
DIMETHOATE (granular)1 
DIMETHOATE (non-granular)5d, 1992.3
DISULFOTON  
Granular Formulations and
Soil-incorporated Liquids
2 
Liquids not Soil-incorporated
3m 
ESFENVALERATE3m, 5d 
FLURIDONE20 
MALATHION2m, 5d, 10 
MANCOZEB199 0.75
METHOMYL3m, 5d 
METHYL PARATHION3m, 5d, 10 
NALED5D, 3992.0
OXYDEMETON-METHYL1992.5
OXYFLUORFEN (granular)1 
OXYFLUORFEN (non-granular)1990.75 
PERMETHRIN3m, 5d 
PHOSMET1m 
PROPACHLOR (granular)1991.3
PROPACHLOR (non-granular)1990.4
PYRETHRINS1m, 5d, 10 
THIOPHANATE-METHYL1m 
TRICHLORFON (granular)2 
TRICHLORFON (non-granular)3993.5

* TAR = Threshold Application Rate (Pounds of active ingredients per acre per application)
CodeLimitations
1Do not apply this pesticide within 20 yards from the edge of water within the shaded area shown on the map for ground applications, nor within 100 yards for aerial applications.
1mWithin the shaded area shown on the map and 1/2 mile up all streams that join the shaded area, do not apply this pesticide within 20 yards from the edge of water for ground applications, nor within 100 yards for aerial applications.
2Do not apply this pesticide within 40 yards from the edge of water within the shaded area shown on the
3mWithin the shaded area shown on the map and 1/2 mile up all streams that join the shaded area do not apply this pesticide within 100 yards from the edge of water for ground applications, nor within 1/4 mile for aerial applications.
5dDo not apply ultra low volume (ULV) applications within 1 mile from the edge of water within the shaded area shown on the map.
10Do not apply directly to water within the shaded area shown on the map, nor within 1 mile up all streams from the shaded area.
41Do not apply this pesticide within 1/4 mile from the edge of water within the shaded area shown on the map for ground applications, nor within 1/2 mile for aerial applications.
43Do not apply this pesticide within 100 yards from the edge of water within the shaded area shown on the map for ground applications, nor within 1/4 mile for aerial applications.
199Do not apply this pesticide above the threshold application rate (TAR) indicated within 20 yards from the edge of water within the shaded area shown on the map for ground applications, nor within 100 yards for aerial applications.
399Do not apply this pesticide above the threshold application rate (TAR) indicated within 100 yards from the edge of water within the shaded area shown on the map for ground applications, nor within 1/4 mile for aerial applications.

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Navajo Sedge

Table of Pesticide Active Ingredients

Active IngredientCode
2, 4-D (all forms)29
ATRAZINE29
CLOPYRALID29
DICAMBA (all forms)29
DICHLORPROP (2, 4-DP)29
HEXAZINONE29
MCPA (all forms)29
PARAQUAT29
PICLORAM (all forms)29
TEBUTHIURON29
CodeLimitations
29Do not apply this pesticide in the species habitat (described unbder the Shading Key). For ground applications do not apply within 20 yards of the habitat, nor within 100 yards for aerial applications.

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Apache trout [Oncorhynchus (=Salmo) apache]

The Apache trout is distinguished by its deep, compressed body with a large dorsal fin. Also known as the Arizona trout, the fish grows to a mature length of 18-23 centimeters (7-9 in). This yellowish or yellow-olive trout is distinctive for the uniformly spaced dark, brown spots which cover its back and sides. The species feeds on terrestrial and aquatic insects by taking them from the surface.

The Apache trout commonly inhabits fast-flowing mountain streams. The severe winters at this high altitude habitat significantly deplete trout numbers, producing a large fluctuation in fish populations. In addition, this species does not spawn until individuals are three years old. Thus, the slow and variable reproduction is a natural barrier to the recovery of this endangered species.

Currently, the largest numbers of the Apache trout are found in the headwaters of the White and Black River systems on the Fort Apache Indian Reservation. Streams in the Gila and Apache-Sitgreaves national forests have been rehabilitated to support reintroduced populations, and several thousand of these fish have been spotted in the East Fork of the White River. Prior to these reintroductions, the range of the Apache trout was reduced to approximately 48 kilometers (30 mi) of stream, an area less than 5 percent of its historic range in Arizona and New Mexico.

Ironically, the largest threat to the existence of the Apache trout is not from direct exploitation, but rather indirectly as a result of introducing non-native fish species into the trout's natural habitat. Brook, rainbow, and brown trouts were introduced into many streams as game fish and have competed with the Apache trout for survival. In addition, the Apache trout has the ability to interbreed with brown trout, producing hybrids and jeopardizing the status of the this species as a genetically identifiable species. During the past twenty years, the Fish and Wildlife Service has struggled, with little success, to eradicate the non-native fish populations from the waters of the Apache trout. However, the development of methods for raising the Apache trout in captivity has greatly improved the chances of a prosperous future for the species. In an effort to return the trout to their natural habitat, hatcheries hope to raise 50,000 fish a year to restock the streams. This action virtually ensures the long-term survival of the Apache trout, as long as suitable habitat exists.

Matthews, J.R. (ed.). 1990. The Official World Wildlife Fund Guide to Endangered Species, Beacham Publishing Inc, Washington, DC. Vol II, pp. 938-939.

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Little Colorado spinedace [Lepidomeda vittata]

The Little Colorado spinedace is a "counter-shaded" minnow, with a back of olive or bluish to lead gray, and a silvery lower body. The counter shading consists of darker colors on its back to allow the spinedace to blend in with the stream bottom below, in order to protect it from predators above, like birds. The lighter color of its belly is similar to the water surface and sky background when looked at from below, protecting the species from predatory fish.

The Little Colorado spinedace is small, even for a minnow, with a length of around 10 centimeters (4 in). The species has a small head and relatively large eyes. This fish spawns primarily in early summer, continuing at a reduced rate until early fall. Like other minnows, the fish feeds on small insects and organic debris.

The spinedace was first described living in Arizona in 1874, when it was taken from the upper portions of the Little Colorado River. It lives in pools of narrow to moderately sized streams with mild temperatures. During droughts, the fish will retreat to springs and intermittent stream bed pools. During flooding, it will spread throughout the stream. Today, this fish is only found in the upper portions of the Little Colorado River and its cool tributaries in Coconino, Navajo, and Apache counties, Arizona. The species cannot survive in reservoirs or other impoundments.

The decline of the Little Colorado Spinedace is the result of detrimental effects from human settlement along the river. Dam building, water pumping, stream channeling, and road building have radically altered the water system within the spinedace's habitat. As with other species in Arizona, the introduction of non-native fish into the river further jeopardizes the spinedace, threatening the species with new predators and competitors in the ecosystem. Spinedace populations were further diminished by the use of fish toxicants associated with "enhancing" the habitat for gamefish introductions.

Currently, the best protection for the spinedace is federal ownership of much its habitat, along with the inaccessibility of associated private lands. Portions of the Little Colorado River, East Clear Creek, Silver Creek and Nutrioso Creek are protected as part of the National Forest System. However, as the human population increases, there will be mounting pressures for recreational access, water diversion, roads, and other development.

Matthews, J.R. (ed.), The Official World Wildlife Fund Guide to Endangered Species, Beacham Publishing Inc, Washington, DC. Vol II, pp. 895-896.

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Navajo sedge [Carex specuicola]

Navajo sedge is a grass-like, perennial plant which grows in clumps of long, narrow, wispy pale green leaves. The plant can reach up to 40 centimeters (16 in) in height, and its leaves are usually about 16 centimeters (6.3 in) long. During the spring and summer months, inconspicuous flowers, consisting of small, green-brown, scale-like parts, bloom.

This threatened sedge grows in dense colonies in damp, sandy to silty soils around shady, spring-fed seepages that occur at about 1,750 meters (5,800 ft) elevation. Because of this, the Navajo sedge was probably never common outside of its current distribution in Coconino County, Arizona. Presently, this plant is found at three sites near the Inscription House Ruin on the Navajo Indian Reservation. Each colony covers an area of about 20 square meters (2,152 sq. ft) around the springs, and as of 1980, all of the populations appeared to be healthy.

Although the springs which support the three Navajo sedge populations are also used to water livestock, the current water arrangement channels water into troughs, away from the sedges and keeps damage to the plants, from trampling, at a minimum. An increase in the number of livestock would certainly increase the damage to the plants, and the populations would most likely be fenced for protection, or the grazing practices modified. The recovery plan for the Navajo sedge recommends restricting cattle from the sedges' habitats to avoid the trampling of plants.

Despite this risk from the livestock, the Fish and Wildlife Service appears content to maintain the current equilibrium between plant and animal. To further ensure the safety of the plants, however, Critical Habitat has been desiginated for all three populations, comprising about 600 square meters (0.015 acres).

Matthews, J.R. (ed.). 1990. The Official World Wildlife Fund Guide to Endangered Species, Beacham Publishing Inc, Washington, DC. Vol I, pp. 75-76.
US Fish and Wildlife Service. 1987. Navajo Sedge Recovery Plan. US Fish and Wildlife Service, Albuquerque, New Mexico. 39 pp.

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