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2011 Grants

US EPA awarded the following Great Lakes Restoration Initiative (GLRI) grants in 2011.

Project Title Organization Amount Description
District of Columbia
Adopting Safer Chemistry in the Great Lakes Region National Pollution Prevention Roundtable $500,000 The National Pollution Prevention Roundtable will partner with the Great Lakes Regional Pollution Prevention Roundtable, Clean Production Action and the Great Lakes Green Chemistry Network to recruit 50-100 companies into a program that challenges companies to reduce their use of hazardous chemicals through source reduction measures.  Expected outcomes include prevention of 2 million pounds of toxic chemicals from entering the Great Lakes ecosystem. 
Illinois
A Protective Barrier to Improve Beach Safety in Chicago Chicago Park District $243,465 The Chicago Park District (CPD) will install a protective barrier at Montrose Beach or Rainbow Beach to prevent nonpoint sources of pollution from outside the beach basin from impacting beach water quality in the swimming area. CPD will also conduct 45 days of intensive sampling and analysis of water and sand inside and outside the barrier area to determine the effectiveness of reducing bacteriological, algal and chemical contamination concentrations in the beach swimming area.
Calumet Invasive Species Conservation Corps Initiative Friends of the Forest Preserves $518,467 The grant will be used to employ five people from diverse communities in the Calumet area to control invasive species on 228 acres in four high-quality natural areas in the Calumet region of the Cook County Forest Preserve District. The project will focus on eradication or control of invasive glossy buckthorn, purple loosestrife, Japanese knotweed, fig buttercup, and spotted knapweed.
Dead Dog Creek Ravine/Stream Restoration Phase 2 Lake County Stormwater Management Commission $675,401 The Lake County Stormwater Management Commission will implement the second and final phase of Dead Dog Creek stream restoration. Dead Dog Creek is a ravine system tributary to coastal wetlands and Lake Michigan. The restoration will implement in-stream, streambank, and riparian buffer water quality and sediment control on 3,950 feet of Dead Dog Creek. This restoration will prevent 67 tons of sediment and 73 pounds of phosphorus from reaching Lake Michigan.
Dune and Beach Restoration for Lake Michigan Beach Health Lake County Health Department and Community Health Center $349,934 The Lake County Health Department (LCHD) will decrease gull habitat and increase biodiversity at North Point Marina in Lake County, Illinois. LCHD will restore and expand the dune and beach area, remove all invasive species, plant native species, monitor water levels, assess vegetation, and educate lifeguards about beach and dune health. This project is expected to reduce bacteria and other pathogens, improve water quality, and reduce swimming bans at North Point Marina.
Enhancing Beach Management for Beach Safety in Chicago Chicago Park District $749,121 The Chicago Park District (CPD) will reduce bacterial contamination from ring-billed gulls, litter, and organic material. CPD will groom twenty four Chicago beaches seven days a week to reduce bacteria from sand and will begin a Beach Ambassador program to educate beachgoers and day camp children about beach health. CPD will collect data on algae mats and detritus to evaluate grooming effectiveness. This project is expected to reduce pollution sources impacting Chicago's Great Lakes beaches, resulting in fewer beach closures or advisories, and improved protection of public health. The project builds on work funded by a 2010 GLRI grant to CPD.
Great Teens for the Great Lakes: A New Generation of Advocacy Shedd Aquarium Society $25,000 The Shedd Aquarium Society will recruit and educate Chicago area teenagers, including those from underserved neighborhoods, to become ambassadors for Great Lakes stewardship. Teenagers from 50 schools and 25 organizations will learn about Great Lakes issues by participating in stewardship activities and through social media interaction.
Illinois Lake Michigan Implementation Plan Illinois Department of Natural Resources $226,950 The Illinois Department of Natural Resources will collaborate with the Alliance for the Great Lakes, Chicago Wilderness, and the Biodiversity Project to develop and implement an Illinois Lake Michigan Implementation Plan to guide resource allocations to protect the Illinois Lake Michigan watershed. The result will be improved prioritization and implementation of on-the-ground restoration projects in the Lake Michigan watershed and coastal zone and an increase in the number and diversity of stakeholders participating in Lakewide Management Plan priorities.
Lake Michigan Forum and Watershed Academy Implementation Delta Institute $200,000 The Delta Institute will use this grant to support the Lake Michigan Forum and Watershed Academy. For the Lake Michigan Forum, Delta will facilitate meetings, provide technical assistance for the Sustainable Harbors Initiative, and conduct a public outreach campaign to increase the number of stakeholders involved in Lakewide Management Plan implementation. For the Watershed Academy, Delta will coordinate a peer to peer network, manage a grants program, assist in the establishment of metrics to track benefits of on the ground projects, and expand the Transportation and Environmental Collaboration Initiative.
Modification of 63rd Street Beach to Improve Water Quality Chicago Park District $182,500 The Chicago Park District will use this grant to install a culvert through an existing pier on the south end of the 63rd Street Beach. The culvert will improve water circulation and reduce bacterial contamination levels at the beach, resulting in fewer beach closures and advisories and improved protection of public health. This project will complement ongoing bacteria management efforts in Chicago, including a waterfowl management project funded through a 2010 GLRI grant to the Chicago Department of Environment.
Simple Avian Management Techniques for Cleaner Beaches Alliance for the Great Lakes $66,504 The Alliance for the Great Lakes will implement simple best management practices to reduce bird populations by reducing food sources at three to five beaches in three Areas of Concern (Milwaukee Estuary, Detroit River, and the Cuyahoga River).  The Alliance will monitor Adopt a Beach Program data to evaluate project effectiveness.  This project is expected to reduce bacteriological contamination and improve water quality at the targeted beaches.
Toxics Reduction through Responsible E-Waste Management The Delta Institute $151,000 Delta Institute will work with businesses and local governments in the Cleveland and Toledo metro areas to develop improved purchasing and management practices that will reduce electronic waste (e-waste) and releases of associated toxic substances. Expected results include preventing the release of 1,915 pounds of lead, 3,400 pounds of plastic and significant quantities of mercury and flame retardants.  
Indiana
Invasive Species Surveillance of the Bait Trade University of Notre Dame $276,150 University of Notre Dame researchers will assess the live bait trade for bighead carp, silver carp, grass carp, black carp, and other target invasive species using molecular techniques. The grant will generate data to quantify the threat posed by the transport and use of live bait and help inform future management efforts to prevent introductions of invasive species through the live bait trade. This funding will also be used to develop educational material on aquatic invasive species.
Thorgren Basin Naturalization and Retrofit Save the Dunes Conservation Fund $607,000 The Save the Dunes Conservation Fund and the City of Valparaiso will retrofit and naturalize the Thorgren detention basin, a critical area designated in the Salt Creek Watershed Management Plan. This project will prevent 61 pounds of phosphorus and 11 tons of sediment from reaching Lake Michigan.
Michigan
Assessing Michigan's Beneficial Use of Sport-Caught Fish Michigan Department of Community Health $498,632 The Michigan Department of Community Health (MDCH) will partner with the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality (MDEQ) and Michigan`s 14 Area of Concern Public Advisory Councils (PACs) to assess progress toward removal of three Beneficial Use Impairments: Fish Consumption Advisories, Tainting of Fish Flavor, and Fish Tumors and Other Deformities. Fish samples will be analyzed for polychlorinated biphenyls, mercury and dioxins. MDCH and MDEQ will evaluate the fish contaminant data and make recommendations for further action. Community-specific public outreach to promote safe sport-caught fish consumption will be developed and implemented by the state and the PACs.
Boardman River Dams Removal - Sediment Management Watershed Center Grand Traverse Bay $533,161 The Watershed Center Grand Traverse Bay and the Boardman River Dams Implementation Team will remove Brown Bridge dam and Sabin dam on the Boardman River. This project will restore 184 acres of wetlands and 2.2 miles of river corridor and prevent 5,589 tons of sediment from reaching Lake Michigan.
Detroit River-Western Lake Erie CWMA and Phragmites Control The Nature Conservancy $534,689 The Nature Conservancy, working with public and private partners, will restore coastal wetlands vital for waterfowl and marshbirds. The project will fund eradication of invasive Phragmites australis on approximately 1,240 acres of Western Lake Erie coastal wetlands in Wayne and Monroe Counties, Michigan. The project will also establish through a spectrum of local partners a large-scale and sustainable approach to Phragmites treatment in a heavily populated area with high recreational value.
Eliminating E.coli Sources Impacting Beach Closures County of Macomb $254,406 The County of Macomb will remove 8,500 square feet of an existing impervious parking lot at a Lake St. Clair beach and replace it with a 15,800 square-foot porous paver driveway and 11,500 square-foot rain garden. This project is expected to reduce stormwater runoff by increasing infiltration, resulting in lower E.coli levels, fewer beach closures, and improved water quality in Lake St. Clair.
Establishing Gull Exclusion Zones at Public Beaches Central Michigan University $247,159 Central Michigan University researchers will use trained border collies to chase geese and other birds from beaches in Ottawa and Muskegon Counties to improve beach water quality and reduce beach closings. The effectiveness of this approach will be assessed by measuring levels of E. coli and zoonotic pathogens in water near the gull exclusion zones.
Eurasian Watermilfoil Strategic Biological Control Program Les Cheneaux Watershed Council $197,250 The grant will support the Les Cheneaux Watershed Council’s work to stock 65,000 milfoil weevils in approximately 16 locations in three bays in the Les Cheneaux Islands region of northern Lake Huron, Michigan to control the invasive Eurasian watermilfoil and restore important perch spawning grounds. The project includes monitoring to assess the long-term effectiveness of this biological control strategy for watermilfoil.
Grand Traverse Bay - East Bay Park Remediation The Watershed Center Grand Traverse Bay $767,648 The Watershed Center Grand Traverse Bay will implement stormwater management measures at three storm drains discharging at East Bay Park. Low impact development techniques such as bio-swales and rain gardens will be used to manage stormwater runoff from the parking lot and permeable pavement will be installed at the canoe/kayak launch. The modifications are expected to eliminate sources of bacterial contamination, protect public health and improve beach water quality.
Grand Traverse Bay - Suttons Bay Stormwater Remediation The Watershed Center Grand Traverse Bay $987,102 The Watershed Center Grand Traverse Bay will implement a series of stormwater management systems at three storm drain outlets using green infrastructure techniques in Suttons Bay. This project is expected to reduce human health risks at two swimming beaches by eliminating sources of bacterial contamination.
Grand Traverse Bay Watershed Protection Project Grand Traverse Regional Land Conservancy $1,000,000 The Grand Traverse Regional Land Conservancy will strategically secure 400 acres of conservation easements to protect water quality of the Grand Traverse Bay. Preservation of this land will prevent 1,160 pounds of nitrogen, 108 pounds of phosphorus, and 26 tons of sediment from entering the Bay and Lake Michigan.
Green Marina Education and Outreach Project, Phase II U of Michigan School of Natural Resources and Environment $199,921 The University of Michigan School of Natural Resources and Environment will use this grant to expand the Great Lakes Green Marina Network by leveraging partnerships developed among marina operators, boating industry experts and specialists from the Sea Grant program to protect water quality and nearshore habitat. The project team will develop and distribute recycling information and pollution prevention kits to encourage boaters to implement best management practices and will provide information about the Clean Boater Act.
Harmful Algal Bloom Mapping for the Great Lakes Michigan Technological University $281,612 Using satellite imagery, tested algorithms for image analysis, and other ancillary data, Michigan Technological University (MTU) will create baseline maps of the areal extent and duration of harmful algal blooms for all five Great Lakes for the period 2008-2012. MTU will share these maps and analyses with Great Lakes agencies, community groups and other stakeholders. MTU will also develop and share a Standard Operating Procedure so that a consistently-applied methodology can continue to be used to update the maps after project completion.
Invasive Predator Suppression on Critical Spawning Reefs The Nature Conservancy $667,971 The Nature Conservancy will control invasive round goby and rusty crayfish populations on five reefs in Grand Traverse and Little Traverse Bays in Lake Michigan to increase the survival of eggs and larvae of native reef fish such as lake trout, cisco, and whitefish. The project will employ innovative (seismic gun) invasive species techniques and refine traditional (trapping) methods. Through monitoring, the project will quantify the effectiveness of the treatments and the changes in survival of the three native fish species.
Invasive Species Early Warning System Validation in Toledo Harbor Wayne State University $498,612 Wayne State University researchers will use conventional sampling and advanced molecular techniques to enhance surveillance for aquatic invasive species in a coastal ecosystem within Lake Erie. The project will develop and implement new invasive species detection protocols appropriate for the Toledo Harbor region. Project results will support development of a comprehensive basinwide surveillance program for the detection of invasive species in the Great Lakes. Findings will be submitted for publication in peer reviewed journals.
Little Traverse Bay Stormwater Management Initiative Tip of the Mitt Watershed Council $887,723 The Tip of the Mitt Watershed Council will protect the water quality of Lake Michigan's fourth largest bay by implementing stormwater best management practices. These practices include: road and stream crossing improvements; construction of a stormwater wetland; stream bank restoration; and construction of rain gardens. These practices will prevent 900 tons of sediment from reaching Little Traverse Bay.
Northeast Michigan–Lake Huron Watershed Community Collaboration Northeast Michigan Council of Governments $265,380 The grant will support collaboration among local residents, governmental entities and other organizations to identify common issues and promote environmentally-responsible decision making in the Northeast Michigan-Lake Huron Watershed. The project will use the Northeast Michigan-Lake Huron Community Collaboration web site to provide access to environmental data and to provide opportunities for collaboration.
Paradise Lake Pilot Boat Washing Station Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians $174,612 The Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians will collaborate with the Michigan Department of Natural Resources and the Paradise Lake Improvement Board to prevent the spread of invasive species by installing and maintaining a boat washing station on an inland lake close to Lake Michigan and Lake Huron with a single access site. The project will provide a model for smaller communities in the Great Lakes seeking to reduce the transport of invasive species by recreational boats.
Reducing Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers in the Great Lakes Great Lakes Commission $190,000 The Great Lakes Commission will measure sources of Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers (PBDEs), a compound used in flame retardants, and will identify substitutes for PBDEs in various products. Industry representatives and others will be engaged to identify PBDE-free alternatives and to develop strategies for reducing exposure to PBDEs.
Reducing the Impact of Stormwater on Metro Beach Huron Clinton Metropark Authority $1,000,000 The Huron Clinton Metropark Authority will use green infrastructure measures to reduce, capture and treat stormwater runoff impacting the Metropolitan Beach Metropark on Lake St. Clair. This project will eliminate approximately 11.5 acres of pavement and establish a new drainage pattern for the parking area that will filter all runoff through a system of vegetative swales and detention areas to an existing 96 acre wetland. These green infrastructure investments will improve water quality and public health at Metro Beach and restore the natural hydrology.
Sediment Reduction in the Sebewaing River Watershed Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development $422,209 The Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development will implement agricultural best management practices to significantly reduce sedimentation and nutrient loss from the Sebewaing River Watershed to the waters of Saginaw Bay. This project will prevent 21,000 tons of sediment, 16 tons of phosphorus, and 33 tons of nitrogen from entering the Sebewaing River, its tributaries, and Saginaw Bay each year.
Sediment Reduction in the Swartz Creek Watershed Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development $376,517 The Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development will implement agricultural best management practices to significantly reduce sedimentation and nutrient loss from the Swartz Creek Watershed to the waters of the Flint River and Saginaw Bay. This project will prevent 5,084 tons of sediment, 4 tons of phosphorus, and 8 tons of nitrogen from entering Swartz Creek, the Flint River, and Saginaw Bay each year.
Targeted Phosphorus Reduction in the Pigeon River Watershed Michigan Department of Environmental Quality $890,735 The Michigan Department of Environmental Quality (MDEQ) will reduce phosphorus loads from the Pigeon River Watershed to address Saginaw Bay’s designated use impairment. MDEQ will use agricultural best management practices at targeted sites in the Lower Pigeon, West Branch Drain and Upper Pigeon subwatersheds, which will reduce phosphorus loads by over 5,000 pounds per year.
Targeting Critical Agricultural Areas with BMPs Macatawa Area Coordinating Council $665,000 The Macatawa Area Coordinating Council will provide cost-share payments to farmers who install agricultural best management practices in critical areas. The project will increase the use of agricultural conservation practices in the watershed and will prevent 15 tons of sediment, 19 tons of phosphorus, and 21 tons of nitrogen from entering Lake Macatawa and Lake Michigan each year.
Toxics Reduction within the Rouge & Detroit River AOCs Wayne County - Department of Public Services $500,000 Wayne County will conduct household hazardous waste and electronic waste (e-waste) collections in the Rouge and Detroit River Areas of Concern (AOCs). The project will target private commercial and industrial facilities in these AOCs that have the highest potential of handling/mishandling toxic materials. The expected results include collection and/or prevention of 15 million gallons of illegal discharges, 500,000 pounds of e-waste, 2,400 pounds of unwanted medicines, and 1 million pounds of household hazardous waste.
Two Hearted Watershed Remediation and Plan Implementation The Nature Conservancy $338,833 The Nature Conservancy will implement management measures contained in the Two Hearted River Watershed Management Plan that will reduce sediment loading by 429 tons and restore 2.5 miles of stream.
White Lake AOC Urban Street BMP Implementation City of Whitehall $376,180 The City of Whitehall will implement an urban street stormwater project using Low Impact Design techniques such as bioswales, naturalized detention, and wetland treatments to improve water quality and reduce nutrient loading within the White Lake Area of Concern.
Minnesota
Extending a Regional Public Outreach Campaign on Aquatic Invasive Species Regents of the University of Minnesota $400,000 The grant will support University of Minnesota Sea Grant program outreach to  prevent the introduction and spread of invasive species in the Great Lakes by enhancing previously successful outreach programs, including the "Nab the Aquatic Invader!" and the "Stop Aquatic Hitchhikers!" campaigns.  The project targets fifteen invasive species pathways, including the pet and aquarium trade, water gardening, and bait production. The project is expected to generate over two million media exposures to the project's message and to result in a reduction in the spread of invasive species.
Reduction of Poly-aromatic hydrocarbon releases from Coal Tar-Based Sealants Minnesota Pollution Control Agency $207,000 The project will reduce the use and release of cancer-causing chemicals from coal tar sealants exposure in the Great Lakes region.
New York
Direct Mitigation of a Harmful Algal Bloom in Sodus Bay Research Foundation of State University of New York at SUNY-ESF $397,147 The project will treat early-stage harmful algal blooms (HABs) using hydrogen peroxide, a methodology successfully used in Europe to protect swimming beaches. Researchers will determine whether peroxide can be used to remove cyanobacteria from Sodus Bay and alleviate severe HABs, without harming desirable planktonic and fish resources.
Eastern Lake Ontario Headwaters Watercraft Inspector Program Paul Smith`s College $332,869 The grant will support implementation by Paul Smith`s College of a recreational boat inspection program to reduce the spread of aquatic invasive species in the headwaters of eastern Lake Ontario. Over 14,000 inspections will take place within the western region of Adirondack Park. The boat inspectors will also provide information to the boating community on aquatic ecology and best methods for preventing the spread of invasive species.
Eighteenmile Creek RAP Coordination 2012-2016 Niagara County Soil & Water Conservation District $497,085 The grant will support the Niagara County Soil and Water Conservation District's (NCSWCD) work as lead agency for Remedial Action Plan (RAP) coordination and management in the Eighteen Mile Creek Area of Concern (AOC) during the next five years. The NCSWCD will continue current efforts to manage AOC planning, assessment, and restoration activities necessary to delist this AOC. The NCSWCD will coordinate with EPA and the State of New York on the Legacy Act site characterization project for this AOC, conduct studies that address contaminant impacts on the creek, continue a number of environmental studies needed to remove Beneficial Use Impairments at the AOC, continue community outreach, and coordinate these projects among the various RAP partners.
Household Toxics Reduction through Consumer Education Pilot Rochester Institute of Technology $104,192 This project will reduce toxic contamination of the Great Lakes from household cleaning products. The grant will support workshops promoting the use of nontoxic products and sustainable practices in communities throughout the Rochester Embayment, Niagara River, Eighteenmile Creek, and St. Lawrence River-Massena Area of Concern watersheds.
New York Teachers Get WET for the Great Lakes! Buffalo Niagara Riverkeeper $168,985 This grant will support two five-day academies and 14 "Get WET for the Great Lakes" institutes at which teachers will be provided with content and methods for conducting watershed education experiences relating to the Buffalo River, Niagara River, Eighteenmile Creek, and Rochester Embayment Areas of Concern in New York State. The project will target teachers from underserved schools and will empower teachers and students to protect fresh water resources through direct stewardship activities in their Areas of Concern. Following the training, teachers will receive support to help them integrate Great Lakes information into their curricula.
Reassessment of Niagara River AOC Sources of Contamination New York State Department of Environmental Conservation $902,573 The grant will build upon previous studies and monitoring efforts (completed in the late 1980`s to mid 1990`s) to reassess point and non-point sources of priority toxic chemicals that have contributed to five of the seven Beneficial Use Impairments (BUIs) at the Niagara River Area of Concern (AOC). While considerable progress has been made by state and local regulatory agencies, a comprehensive reassessment is needed to determine whether delisting criteria have been met and to identify remaining sources of contamination. The sampling program will focus on hazardous waste sites, wastewater discharges and primary tributaries. The expected outcomes include reduction of toxic substances entering the Niagara River and the eventual removal of five of the seven BUIs present at this AOC.
Sturgeon Blood & Tissue Assay of Pollutants in Rochester Embayment University of Rochester School of Medicine & Dentistry $307,487 This project will evaluate fish contaminant levels in the Rochester Embayment Area of Concern to determine if the Restrictions on Fish Consumption Beneficial Use Impairment can be removed. This project will produce updated data on the level of toxic contaminants (silver, mercury, polychlorinated biphenyls, dioxins/furans and pesticides) in the tissue of lake sturgeon residing in the Lower Genesee River. These data will be compared with age-matched lake sturgeon in a nearby tributary.
Toxics Reduction and Sustainability in Paper Manufacturing Rochester Institute of Technology $200,000 Rochester Institute of Technology researchers will conduct assessments at four paper manufacturing companies to identify opportunities to reduce toxic chemical releases to the Great Lakes, reduce energy consumption and water usage, and reduce operational costs. The companies implementing the recommendations are expected to reduce releases of mercury, Polychlorinated Biphenyls s and Poly-aromatic hydrocarbons by 5%, reduce fuel and water consumption, and reduce costs.
Wetland Monitoring for Lake Ontario Adaptive Management The Nature Conservancy $299,495 The Nature Conservancy will use the grant to assemble and finalize cost-effective protocols for restoration of more natural conditions in the Lake Ontario/St. Lawrence system. This project builds on the International Joint Commission's Lake Ontario and St. Lawrence River study, which found that regulation of the system altered natural cycling of water levels and impacted coastal areas. The project will also initiate the environmental monitoring work called for in the International Joint Commission's framework for adaptive management.
Xenobiotics in Fish from NY's Great Lakes Waters - Phase 2 New York State Department of Environmental Conservation $250,000 The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation will produce updated fish contaminant data for chemicals that impact human and ecosystem health in the St. Lawrence River. This project is phase two (of four phases) of a fish sampling project that was funded by a GLRI FY2010 grant to measure legacy and other emerging chemicals of concern in the St. Lawrence River/Massena Area of Concern (AOC). The New York State Department of Health and the St. Regis Mohawk Tribe will evaluate the data to produce appropriate fish consumption advisories for New York State and Tribal waters. These data will determine the status of the Restrictions on Fish and Wildlife Consumption Beneficial Use Impairment for this AOC.
Ohio
Coordinated Implementation Strategy for Lake Erie LaMP Ohio Environmental Council $242,837 The Ohio Environmental Council will coordinate the Lake Erie Lakewide Management Plan Public Forum to facilitate effective, basin-wide implementation of Lakewide Management Plan goals. The grant will be used to train new and existing Forum members to engage civic and community leaders, stakeholder groups, and local and regional media outlets to support implementation of conservation practices and increased enrollment in conservation programs that will restore and protect the Lake Erie watershed.
Deploying Debris Management System in Cuyahoga River Areas of Concern Cleveland-Cuyahoga County Port Authority $425,160 The grant will be used to purchase and deploy vessels and containment boom to capture floating debris in the North Coast Harbor and Cuyahoga Ship Channel to address the Degradation of Aesthetics Beneficial Use Impairment for the Cuyahoga River Area of Concern.
Fish Deformity Data Collection and Analysis Ohio Environmental Protection Agency $177,688 Ohio EPA will assess the status of the Fish Tumors and Other Deformities Beneficial Use Impairment (BUI) in the Black River, Cuyahoga River and Maumee River Areas of Concern (AOCs). Sampling and analysis will be conducted to determine the extent of deformities, erosions, lesions and tumors in resident fish populations. The results will be compared to Ohio’s delisting targets for BUI removal.
Invasive Plant Partnership in the Cuyahoga River Basin Cleveland Metroparks $369,472 Cleveland Metroparks will control a variety of invasive plants on more than 6,000 acres in the Cuyahoga River basin, map priority natural areas, create a youth jobs corps, and plant native species along stream corridors to improve riparian and in-stream habitats for native aquatic species.
Lake Erie Nutrient Reduction Demonstration Watershed Ohio Environmental Protection Agency $546,417 The Ohio Environmental Protection Agency will implement a series of targeted nutrient reduction practices identified in the Sandusky River Total Maximum Daily Load report.  In 2010, the Sandusky River discharged high levels of dissolved reactive phosphorus into Lake Erie. This project will prevent 14,741 pounds of nitrogen, 2,580 pounds of phosphorus, and 479 tons of sediment from reaching Lake Erie.
Long-term Phragmites Control through the Lake Erie CWMA The Nature Conservancy $331,669 The Nature Conservancy will use fire/mechanized treatments, follow-up herbicide treatments, and reseeding with native species to eradicate or control invasive Phragmites australis on approximately 900 acres of western Lake Erie shoreline in Ottawa, Sandusky and Erie Counties, Ohio. This project will restore remnant coastal wetlands that support an estimated 500,000 waterfowl and migratory shorebirds as well as fish spawning habitat.
Maumee Area of Concern--Wolf Creek: Passive Treatment Wetland to Improve Nearshore Health and Reduce Nonpoint Source Pollution University of Toledo $1,348,595 University of Toledo researchers will construct a 10-acre, terraced wetland and floodplain in the  Maumee Area of Concern to reduce the amount of bacteria, nutrient, and sediment entering Lake Erie through the Wolf Creek watershed.  In addition, this project will increase coastal wetland acreage for fish and wildlife habitat.
Ohio Lake Erie Phosphorus Task Force Phase II Ohio EPA $122,429 The Ohio EPA will reconvene the Ohio Lake Erie Phosphorus Task Force to build upon its 2010 report and broaden participation to include agri-business representatives and crop consultants. The project will incorporate current research and work to develop a broader consensus on the management actions necessary to reduce algal blooms in Lake Erie’s western basin.
West Creek Ecosystem Restoration Project Cleveland Metroparks $294,693 Cleveland Metroparks will use an ecosystem approach to restore the West Creek watershed, which is an urban watershed in the Cuyahoga River Area of Concern.  The grant will be used for design, construction, and monitoring to determine the effectiveness of the project on nonpoint source pollution.
Pennsylvania
Cascade Creek Stream Corridor Remediation - Phase V Erie-Western Pennsylvania Port Authority $387,664 The Erie-Western Pennsylvania Port Authority will remediate an additional 450 feet of Cascade Creek and reduce non-point source pollution entering Presque Isle Bay, an Area of Concern in recovery. The Authority will reduce sediment loading to Lake Erie by 98 tons per year, improve water quality and fish and wildlife habitat, naturalize streambank gradient, and reduce a parking lot footprint.
Wisconsin
A Targeted Landowner Approach to Watershed Restoration Northland College $300,000 Northland College will advance the Lake Superior Lakewide Management Plan by working to increase the number and diversity of stakeholders implementing priority projects in the Marengo River and Fish Creek watersheds in the Chequamegon Bay area. This work will involve coordinating the technical implementation capacity of regional County Land and Water Conservation Departments with the outreach capacity of the Bad River Watershed Association to increase landowner adoption of Best Management Practices in priority sub-basins. The partnership will also establish an outreach-implementation model that can be expanded throughout the region by the Chequamegon Bay Area Partnership. Projects will include wetland restoration, livestock fencing, access and crossing improvements, riparian buffer zones, culvert replacements, and stream bank stabilization.
Implement Mitigation Strategies at Sanitary Survey Beaches University of Wisconsin Oshkosh $1,073,630 The University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh will use beach sanitary survey data collected from impaired coastal beaches in Wisconsin to prioritize clean-up activities at 12-20 locations. Beaches will also be redesigned to reduce the impact of nonpoint source contamination... This project is expected to improve water quality and protect public health at Great Lakes beaches.
Implemention of Beach BMPs to Improve Water Quality Door County Soil & Water Conservation Department $702,300 The Door County Soil & Water Conservation Department will design and install green infrastructure measures to reduce, capture, and treat stormwater runoff to improve water quality at public beaches. These measures include the reduction of impervious surfaces near beach areas, installation of rain gardens and bio-filters, and reduction of waterfowl landing and congregation at beaches.
Lake Superior Binational Forum LaMP Implementation Northland College $173,000 Northland College will support the Binational Lake Superior Forum's work to implement the following Lakewide Management Plan priorities: 1) develop an Aquatic Invasive Species education and outreach campaign for tourism and water recreation audiences; and 2) increase the number and diversity of stakeholders who are informed about and actively engaged in public dialogue about the impacts of mining in the Lake Superior watershed. The project will also support Forum implementation of the Lake Superior Zero Discharge Demonstration Program.
Plum and Kankapot Creeks Riparian Protection Outagamie County Land Conservation Department $747,741 The Outagamie County Land Conservation Department will use this grant to provide incentives for agricultural producers to install vegetated buffer strips on approximately 14 miles of intermittent and perennial streams in the Plum and Kankapot Creek watersheds, which are significant contributors of sediment and phosphorus to the Lower Fox River. The buffer strips will prevent an estimated 1,000 tons of sediment and 6,000 pounds of phosphorus from entering Green Bay in Lake Michigan each year. Fifteen-year operation and maintenance agreements will be used to ensure longevity of the buffers.
Red Swamp Crayfish Prevention, Containment and Eradication Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources $286,843 The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources will contain and eradicate Wisconsin's only known populations of invasive red swamp crayfish from ponds in Washington and Kenosha Counties to protect native crayfish, fish and amphibian populations, and to safeguard nearby Lake Michigan. The project will also monitor for the red swamp crayfish in nearby areas to ensure complete eradication of the species.
Reducing Invasive Live Organisms in Trade in Great Lakes Waterbodies Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources $385,307 The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources will conduct a comprehensive examination of the live plant trade by nurseries, water garden, and aquarium retailers. The grant will support education and outreach to reduce invasive species introductions by the approximately 100 Wisconsin retailers estimated to be involved in this business. Field sampling in areas which are a high risk for invasive species introductions will help inform future management efforts.
Stormwater Management at University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Power Plant University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee $85,733 The University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee will construct a cistern designed to capture the quantity of rainwater predicted to fall on the 13,000 square foot roof of the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Power Plant during a two year storm event. The cistern system will drain into a rain garden. This project is expected to reduce the scale and frequency of combined sewer overflows into the Milwaukee Estuary Area of Concern, which will reduce pollution of Milwaukee beaches.

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