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Human Health

The health of the residents of any community is directly related to the environmental health of that community. Individual, family, and environmental health must be considered and maintained.

Human Health
Pesticides, Herbicides, Insecticides
Lead Exposure
Radon Exposure
Indoor Air Quality
Air Quality
Household Hazardous Wastes
Ozone

Inventorying and Information Gathering

The resources listed below focus on individual and family health. These are sources that will provide information on and assistance with health related issues.

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Human Health

Environmental Health includes becoming aware of environmental risks and factors within your community and learning how to reduce your personal and your family's exposure to these risks. Factors that may pose a risk to the environmental health of your community are lead, radon, indoor air quality, air quality, household hazardous wastes and ozone depletion. Identifying and becoming knowledgeable about these factors will help to protect your community. One beneficial source of information can be found at the EPA's Toxic Release Inventory-Community Right to Know Page. Action Plans for these risk factors are discussed in our Let's Go Section.

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Pesticides, Herbicides, Insecticides

An inventory of your community’s use of pesticides, herbicides and insecticides may be challenging to achieve.  However, communities are looking to less toxic, alternative ways to control pest and ‘green’ operations in their public, commercial and residential properties and buildings.  By reducing the need for pesticides, herbicides and insecticides through natural landscaping/native vegetation for example, communities will reduce air and water pollution and reduce human exposure to these chemicals.  Integrated pest management is an important strategy that will reduce the need for and use of pesticides in order to protect the environment and human health. 

By working collaboratively with local/county government, schools, recreation facilities (golf courses, playing fields, public/private parks), local farmers, homeowners and businesses,  an increased awareness of the practices, volume and disposal of these chemicals can lead to strategies that will increase worker/personal safety, reduce the use, volume and extent of toxic chemicals.

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Lead Exposure

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Radon Exposure

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Indoor Air Quality

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Air Quality

Hazardous Air Pollutants (Air Toxics)

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Ozone

Available Information

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Household Hazardous Wastes

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You will need Adobe Acrobat Reader, available as a free download, to view some of the files on this page. See EPA's PDF page to learn more about PDF, and for a link to the free Acrobat Reader.


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