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Environmental Regulations and Policies Inventory

Scales of JusticeThis section is a starting point for determining which federal regulations affect your community. Not all of the regulations described here will apply while others, not described here, might. In addition, state and local regulations might differ from the federal regulations. The best approach is to contact your state environmental or health agency to find out how the regulations differ.

And, remember, prevention is the best medicine. The best way to protect people's health and the environment is to reduce the amount of waste and pollution created in the first place. Pollution prevention should be a priority for every community.

Information in this section is excerpted from "Environmental Planning for Small Communities, A Guide for Local Decision Makers" by EPA's Office of Research and Development and Office of Regional Operations and State/Local Relations, Washington, D.C.

Included on this page is information on the following topics:

Air Pollution
Radon Gas in Homes and Other Buildings
Drinking Water Quality
Source Water Protection
Wastewater Treatment
Solid Waste Management
Hazardous Waste Management
Asbestos-Containing Materials in Buildings
Underground Storage Tank Safety
Emergency Response to Hazardous Substance Spills
Wetlands Protection
Floodplain Zoning
Nonpoint Source Pollution

Air Pollution

The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 give EPA the authority to set national outside (ambient) air quality standards to protect people's health and the environment from air pollutants. Air pollution can come from stationary sources (e.g., factories, power plants, and smelters) or from mobile sources (e.g., cars, buses, planes, trucks, and trains).

Do the Clean Air Act Amendments Apply to My Community?

Most provisions of the Clean Air Act Amendments will not affect very small communities. Some communities, however, might have wood burning or particulate problems that will need to be solved. In addition, the Act contains several new requirements that are of particular concern to small businesses, including:

This is a general list of the typical kinds of small businesses or area sources that are being affected by one or more of the air pollution control programs under the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments:

All small businesses should consult their state pollution control agency for more details about the specific controls required in their area.

What Action Should My Community Be Taking?

Before taking any action on air pollution issues, contact your state air pollution agency or county health department and your regional EPA small community coordinator to discuss problems and possible solutions.

Where Are the Regulations Published?

The regulations implementing the Clean Air Act Amendments can be found in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Parts 1 to 99.

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Radon Gas in Homes and Other Buildings

Radon is a radioactive gas that comes from the natural breakdown (radioactive decay) of uranium in soil, rocks, and water. The U.S. Surgeon General has warned that radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer in the United States today. Radon moves up through the ground and enters homes and other buildings through the basement or foundation. In almost one out of every 15 homes in the United States, indoor radon levels are estimated to exceed levels recommended by EPA to protect people's health.

In 1988, Congress enacted the Indoor Radon Abatement Act (IRAA) with the goal of reducing indoor radon levels to those found in outside air. In response to IRAA, EPA has:

Does the Indoor Radon Abatement Act Apply to My Community?

Your community might have homes, day care centers, schools, or commercial buildings with indoor radon levels higher than the federal guidelines. Most radon-related policies, however, are not federal laws. EPA, state, and local governments have focused their energies on educating the public about the health risk of radon and encouraging voluntary testing of homes and buildings. Some states have developed radon regulations, however, and those states train and certify radon experts and require testing of all public schools.

What Action Should My Community Be Taking?

To protect your community from the harmful effects of indoor radon, you should contact your state radon office. Ask them to give you information about radon, including:

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Drinking Water Quality

Congress passed the Safe Drinking Water Act in 1974 to make sure that the drinking water supplied to the public is safe. In 1986, Congress strengthened the Act because of concerns about the growing number of threats to the safety of the nation's drinking water. The Safe Drinking Water Act applies to your community if you have a public water system with at least 15 service connections (homes and businesses that receive water from your system) or a system that regularly serves at least 25 people. In most states, the state department of health or environmental protection provides technical and regulatory assistance for public water systems.

The Safe Drinking Water Act also applies to privately owned public water systems such as mobile home parks and water companies, noncommunity systems, such as factories, schools, and campgrounds with their own water supply. Compliance is the responsibility of the owner/operator of these nonmunicipal systems, but people will probably turn to local officials if something is wrong with their water system. Therefore, if such systems exist in your community, it's a good idea to be aware of the requirements for these systems and work with the systems' owners/operators to provide safe drinking water. These systems may also benefit from consolidation with the municipal system.

What Contaminants Does My Community Need To Test For?

EPA has established maximum contaminant levels (MCLs) based on estimated health risks that many contaminants might cause. More than 100 substances are regulated by the Safe Drinking Water Act, and the list is growing. Most of these substances fall into one of the following categories: coliform bacteria, disinfection byproducts, inorganic chemicals, synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, fluorides, lead and copper, radionuclides, nitrates/nitrites, and asbestos. Contact your state agency to find out more about drinking water standards as they apply to your community.

What Should I Do if Test Results Exceed MCLS?

In all cases, if the level of a contaminant in the public water supply is higher than the MCL, you should:

Public Notification

The Safe Drinking Water Act requires that all owners or operators of public drinking water systems notify their customers when drinking water standards are violated. The purpose of public notification is to inform consumers of any potential adverse health effects, and to tell them what steps they can take to minimize their impact. Always notify your state agency of the violation first, and ask their direction in proceeding with public notification.

Where Are the Regulations Published?

The regulations implementing the Safe Drinking Water Act can be found in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Parts 141, 142, and 143.

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Source Water Protection

The best way to avoid contamination and expensive cleanup of drinking water is to prevent your water supply from becoming polluted in the first place. The 1986 Amendments to the Safe Drinking Water Act ask each state to develop a source water protection program to protect public water supply wells and well fields from contamination. The law specifies that all states participate; however, there are no penalties for states that do not participate, nor are there funds available to help states develop these programs. In addition, EPA has no authority to set up a source water protection program if a state chooses not to establish one.

An effective source water protection program requires the participation of all levels of government. Your responsibilities as a local government official depend on the specific requirements of your state's source water protection program.

If your state adopts a source water protection program, you will be required to enforce your state's specific requirements for your area. Even if your state does not adopt a source water protection program, it is in your community's interest to do everything possible to protect your water supply. To find out more about protecting the quality of your community's water supply, contact your state agency.

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Wastewater Treatment

Federal regulations have been developed to govern various aspects of wastewater treatment. These regulations cover:

Each of these topics, and the federal regulations governing them, are discussed below.

Pretreatment of Industrial Wastewater

Pretreatment of industrial wastewater refers to the steps that industries take to remove pollutants from wastewater before they discharge it into the public sewer system. Pretreatment must remove toxic and hazardous pollutants from wastewater, which could either pass through or interfere with the community treatment plant. The Clean Water Act of 1977 set National Pretreatment Standards to control pollutants that cannot be removed by or might interfere with wastewater treatment processes.

The National Pretreatment Standards specify quantities or concentrations of pollutants that may be discharged to a treatment plant by industrial users. In addition, the National Pretreatment Standards prohibit everyone, including the public, from putting the following pollutants in their wastewater:

Does This Regulation Apply to My Community?

Traditionally, small wastewater treatment plants with a design flow of less than one million gallons per day are not required to establish local pretreatment programs. Very small communities often have few, if any, industrial users.

If your community does have industrial users (such as sawmills, food processing plants, and metal finishers) that discharge the type of pollutants described on the previous page, which could pass through or interfere with your treatment facility, your community might have to implement a pretreatment program to satisfy the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit requirements. EPA or approved state environmental control agencies have the responsibility for administering these permits. (NPDES permits are discussed later in this section.) In addition, state agencies will implement pretreatment programs for communities that are too small to implement their own.

What Action Should My Community Be Taking?

To determine whether you are required to set up a pretreatment program in your community, contact your state water quality agency. If such a program is necessary, the agency will assist you in its development. Make sure that all affected industries are aware of the pretreatment standards that they need to meet.

If you are required to establish a pretreatment program, you must establish local ordinances and other procedures to implement program requirements. You must also identify personnel who will be responsible for administering and enforcing the program.

Finally, any time you suspect a problem caused by a nondomestic wastewater producer, notify your treatment works operator, county sanitarian, and appropriate state agency or department.

Where Are the Regulations Published?

The regulations for pretreatment of industrial wastewater are in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Part 403.

The National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES)

In response to the nation's growing concern about water pollution, major federal laws were passed in the 1970s that required the restoration and maintenance of clean water for residential, commercial, recreational, and agricultural uses. The 1972 Amendments to the Water Pollution Control Act, which was later amended and renamed the Clean Water Act in 1977, set federal water quality standards and cleanup schedules for meeting pollution control requirements. One way in which the goals of these acts are achieved is through NPDES permits, which set limits on the level of pollutants allowed to be discharged. These permits, issued mostly by state agencies but in some cases by EPA, are issued to operators that discharge any pollutant from point sources to a navigable waterway, such as a lake, river, stream, wetland, or ocean.

Under the Clean Water Act, states must determine how each body of navigable water is to be classified. This classification system designates the water body for one or more of the following uses: drinking, fishing, swimming, and deep water ports. The water quality standards used to develop NPDES permits are intended to maintain the designated use or uses of the water body. For example, permits are likely to be less restrictive for a facility that is discharging wastewater into a river that is not used for drinking water or recreational purposes than for a facility that is discharging into a recreational lake that is designated for fishing and swimming. New permits also will include residuals quality. These same regulations also govern the disposal of septic tank pumpings (septage) for unsewered communities.

NPDES permits are also required for wastewater treatment plants that discharge into waterways. For most wastewater treatment plants, their NPDES permit requires that they must (at a minimum) meet secondary treatment standards. Secondary treatment means that the plant must install technologies that go beyond the settling of solids to remove 85 percent of the conventional pollutants (materials that deplete oxygen from the water) and control acidity.

Do These Regulations Apply to My Community?

Every community deals with the issue of wastewater. Not all communities, however, have to comply with the surface water quality standards established under the Clean Water Act. Thousands of towns and communities are subject only to state and local requirements, since they use septic tanks or communitywide systems that do not discharge treated wastewater into navigable waters.

All wastewater treatment facilities that discharge to U.S. waters, however, must comply with the NPDES requirements. Most of these plants need only meet the secondary treatment standards, but plants that discharge into high-quality waters may have to meet more stringent standards.

What Action Should My Community Be Taking?

To make sure that your community complies with the wastewater regulations established by the Clean Water Act, you should do the following:

If your community has a wastewater treatment facility that discharges into a body of water make sure that you have an NPDES permit for operating the treatment plant.

Where Are the Regulations Published?

The regulations governing the NPDES permitting process are in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Parts 122 to 125. The Secondary Treatment Regulations are in Title 40, Part 133.

Biosolids Management

Biosolids (sewage sludge) are removed from wastewater during the treatment process. Federal regulations require that sludge be handled properly when it is used for beneficial purposes (such as for a soil conditioner or fertilizer) or when it is disposed of in a landfill, in another surface disposal site, or in an incinerator. Different requirements apply for sludge that is used for beneficial purposes and sludge that is disposed of. Sludge can be stored on site for up to two years before use or disposal. Sludge that remains on site for more than two years must meet additional regulatory requirements.

Do These Regulations Apply to My Community?

These regulations apply to all communities that use a central wastewater treatment plant or mechanical plant, including a lagoon, which produces sludge.

What Action Should My Community Be Taking?

If your community generates biosolids through its wastewater treatment process, you should:

If your community uses sludge for beneficial purposes, you should be aware of and follow proper methods for the agricultural and nonagricultural land application of sludge. The use of contaminated sludge can threaten the health of the residents of your community. Many plants uptake contaminants which can then be passed on to humans when eaten.

Where Are the Regulations Published?

Biosolids Program Regulations are contained in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Parts 122, 123, and 501. Technical regulations for sewage sludge use and disposal are in Title 40, Parts 258 and 503.

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Solid Waste Management

Municipal solid waste is nonhazardous waste generated in homes, offices, schools, restaurants, and other places. Solid waste that is not recycled must be disposed of and landfilling is still the most common disposal method. The regulations affecting municipal solid waste disposal facilities (landfills) are the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Subtitle D, Municipal Solid Waste Landfill Criteria.

The purpose of Subtitle D is to prevent solid waste from polluting the soil or ground water by being disposed of improperly. Subtitle D regulates the location, design, operation, ground-water monitoring, and closure and postclosure care (including financing) for both old and new municipal landfills.

Subtitle D applies if your community owns and operates a landfill, is planning to build a landfill, or is disposing of solid waste anywhere except in a landfill. If you have questions about the regulations and whether they apply to your community, contact your state environmental agency for help. Also contact your state agency to discuss your options, and cooperate with neighboring communities to find an appropriate solid waste management solution.

What Action Should My Community Be Taking?

To comply with the Subtitle D Municipal Solid Waste Landfill Criteria, you should contact your state agency to find out if your community's landfill is exempt from any of the Subtitle D regulations. Then follow the regulations that do apply.

In addition, as a community leader, you should try to reduce the amount of solid waste that your community produces by:

Where Are the Regulations Published?

The Municipal Solid Waste Landfill Criteria can be found in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Part 258.

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Hazardous Waste Management

RCRA, as amended in 1984, regulates the disposal of all household, municipal, commercial, and industrial waste, including hazardous waste. The main goals of RCRA are:

A hazardous waste is a waste that poses a potential danger to people's health and/or the environment when improperly treated, stored, transported, disposed of, or otherwise managed. RCRA Subtitle C regulates hazardous waste from the moment the waste is generated until its ultimate disposal.

There are three categories of hazardous waste generators under the RCRA program requirements:

  1. Large Quantity Generator-Facilities that generate more than 1,000 kilograms (2,200 pounds) of any hazardous waste each month, or more than 1 kilogram (2.2 pounds) of any acute hazardous, waste. Large quantity generators are subject to all RCRA requirements.

  2. Small Quantity Generator-Facilities that generate between 100 and 1,000 kilograms (220 to 2,200 pounds) of hazardous waste each month. Small quantity generators generally may accumulate hazardous waste on site for up to 180 days, and may not accumulate more than 6,000 kilograms on site at any one time.

  3. Conditionally Exempt Small Quantity Generators-Facilities that generate less than 100 kilograms of any hazardous waste each month. These facilities are exempt from most RCRA hazardous waste requirements. Conditionally exempt small quantity generators, however, must identify their waste to determine if it is hazardous; treat or dispose of the waste in either a recycling or permitted hazardous waste facility; and not accumulate more than 1,000 kilograms of hazardous waste at any given time.

Does This Regulation Apply to My Community?

The requirements of RCRA Subtitle C apply to hazardous waste generators, transporters, and storage, treatment, and disposal facilities. Some types of hazardous wastes might be generated by businesses in your community or by your municipal facility operations themselves. A waste is considered hazardous if it has been listed by EPA as a hazardous waste or if the waste has any of four hazardous characteristics:

EPA regulations require all waste generators to evaluate whether their wastes have any of the four hazardous characteristics. Wastes that have any of these characteristics are subject to Subtitle C hazardous waste regulations. In addition, some wastes are considered to be "acutely hazardous." These are wastes that EPA has determined to be very dangerous, even in small amounts, such as certain pesticides and wastes containing dioxins.

If you are not sure if a business, industry, or municipal facility in your community is generating a hazardous waste or is subject to the RCRA hazardous waste regulations, contact your state agency or the RCRA Hotline at 800-424-9346.

Where Are the Regulations Published?

The hazardous waste regulations can be found in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Parts 260-272.

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Asbestos-Containing Materials in Buildings

The Asbestos Hazard Emergency Response Act (AHERA) of 1986 requires schools to inspect buildings for materials containing asbestos and to develop a plan to properly manage asbestos-containing materials in all school buildings. The management plans were submitted to state agencies in May 1989, and school districts and individual private schools began implementing their plans in July 1989. School districts and individual private schools should update their management plans to reflect any actions that they have taken.

Under the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP), all public buildings must be inspected for asbestos-containing materials before any renovation or demolition occurs. The owner must notify the appropriate regulatory agency of all demolition activities, even if asbestos is not found. If asbestos is found in a building to be demolished, NESHAP establishes certain work practices, waste disposal methods, and record keeping requirements that must be followed. For renovations, the owner must notify the regulatory agency and meet work practice, waste disposal, and record keeping requirements if the quantities of asbestos-containing materials exceed 160 square feet, 260 linear feet, or 35 cubic feet. In addition, the 1990 amendments to AHERA mandate that if a building owner renovates or demolishes a building regulated under NESHAP, people accredited under AHERA must be used to inspect, design, and conduct all asbestos-related activities.

Finally, under the Asbestos Abatement Projects Worker Protection Final Rule (WPR), employers of public employees that are handling friable asbestos-containing materials must comply with provisions to protect their employees from exposure to asbestos fibers. Employers must monitor the air, use specific engineering controls and work practices, provide medical surveillance and training to employees, and notify the EPA regional asbestos coordinator of their activities.

For more information about asbestos and vermiculite, go to EPA's Asbestos homepage.

Do the Asbestos Regulations Apply to My Community?

Every local public school system or nonprofit private school (K-12) must designate and train one person to oversee asbestos-related activities, including:

All small communities involved with the renovation or demolition of buildings must comply with NESHAP and AHERA accreditation requirements. In addition, if public employees are used to handle friable asbestos-containing materials, the community must also follow the WPR.

What Action Should My Community Be Taking?

As a local official you should ensure that:

Where Are the Regulations Published?

The Asbestos-Containing Materials in Schools Rules and the Worker Protection Rule are in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Part 763. The NESHAP rules for asbestos are in Title 40, Part 61.

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Underground Storage Tank Safety

There are several million underground storage tanks (USTs) in the United States that contain petroleum or hazardous chemicals. As many as 20 percent of all USTs might now be leaking, and many more are expected to leak in the future. Leaking USTs can cause fires or explosions that threaten people's safety. They also can contaminate nearby ground water and cause problems with drinking water quality.

Congress responded to the problem of leaking USTs by adding Subtitle I to RCRA. The goals of the UST regulations are to:

Does This Regulation Apply to My Community?

These regulations apply to you if you own or operate an UST containing either petroleum or certain hazardous chemicals. An UST is one or any combination of tanks, including underground piping connected to the tank, that has at least 10 percent of the volume underground. If you are unsure whether or not the UST regulations apply to you, contact your state environmental agency or the RCRA Hotline at 800-424-9346.

What Are the Specific Requirements of RCRA Subtitle I?

RCRA Subtitle I regulates the installation, maintenance, monitoring, and closure of both new and existing USTs. The regulations also give specific instructions for the proper way to deal with leaks and spills, including corrective action. According to the regulations, new USTs are those installed after December 22, 1988, and existing USTs are those installed on or before December 22, 1988. All new USTs must comply with the regulations before installation. Existing USTs will eventually need to comply with the same regulations as new USTs. The deadlines for compliance, however, are spread out over time. The requirements for petroleum and chemical USTs are very similar, although there are a few special requirements for chemical USTs.

Where Are the Regulations Published?

The Underground Storage Tank regulations are contained in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Part 280.

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Emergency Response to Hazardous Substance Spills

In 1986, Congress passed the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) also known as SARA Title III to help U.S. communities deal safely and effectively with the many hazardous substances that are used throughout our society. The law has two main purposes:

EPCRA requires facilities to notify communities and states immediately if there is a chemical spill. In addition, the act requires all facilities, large or small, manufacturing or nonmanufacturing, industrial or government, to report information about the amounts, location, and potential effects of certain hazardous chemicals present above the threshold levels specified by EPA.

Does This Regulation Apply to My Community?

Yes, every community in the United States must be part of a comprehensive plan for responding to chemical emergencies. The governor of your state has appointed a State Emergency Response Commission (SERC). Each SERC, in turn, has divided its state into local emergency planning districts and appointed a Local Emergency Planning Committee (LEPC) for each district. At a minimum, each committee must include representatives of state and local government; law enforcement officials; firefighters; first aid, health, hospital, environmental, and transportation workers; community groups; broadcast and print media; and owners and operators of industrial plants and businesses.

What Chemicals Must Be Reported Under the Act?

Over 1,000 chemicals are considered to be hazardous or extremely hazardous substances that could represent an immediate danger to the community if they are spilled or released into the environment. Releases of these substances must be reported immediately to the SERC and LEPC. Thousands of other chemicals are considered to be hazardous or toxic chemicals that represent a significant physical or health hazard when present in critical amounts. Facilities need to inventory these chemicals and submit specific information about these materials to the SERCs, LEPCs, and local fire departments. For more information on how to comply with these regulations, contact your SERC or LEPC.

What Action Should My Community Be Taking?

As a local official, you are responsible for making sure that all public facilities in your community (such as hospitals, schools, wastewater or drinking water treatment plants) comply with the act by immediately reporting any hazardous or extremely hazardous substances that they release or spill to the SERC and LEPC.

In addition, you should take the following steps to ensure that your community is prepared to respond to chemical accidents:

Where Are the Regulations Published?

The regulations implementing EPCRA can be found in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Parts 300, 350, 370, 372.

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Wetlands Protection

Wetlands are marshes, swamps, bogs, and other similar wet areas. Wetlands can be coastal or inland, saltwater or freshwater. They are an important resource because they help improve water quality, reduce flood and storm damage, provide important fish and wildlife habitats, and support hunting and fishing activities. The two most important laws dealing with wetlands protection are Section 404 of the Clean Water Act and the Swampbuster Section of the Food Security Act.

Under Section 404, EPA and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers established a permit program to control the release and dumping of dredged or fill materials into most wetlands. As a result, you need to apply for a permit for almost any type of activity that affects or might affect wetlands, such as dumping or building on or near a wetland. The Swampbuster Program withholds federal farm program benefits from anyone who:

Does This Regulation Apply to My Community?

Wetlands can be found in almost every county of every state in the United States. Although there are many exceptions, especially for farmers, you should always assume that you need a permit and check with someone from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers before you begin any activities that might affect a wetland. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers will be able to tell you if you need an individual permit or not. Anyone who violates Section 404, either by not getting a permit or by disregarding the conditions of a permit, may have to pay to restore the area, pay fines, and/or go to jail.

What Action Should My Community Be Taking?

To comply with Section 404 of the Clean Water Act, you should:

Where Are the Regulations Published?

The regulations implementing Section 404 of the Clean Water Act are in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Part 230.

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Floodplain Zoning

Floodplain zoning is part of the federal government's national flood insurance program. Flood insurance is not available through private insurance companies. If a community wishes to be part of the national flood insurance program, it is required to follow certain building and zoning requirements set by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). FEMA is responsible for:

FEMA has prepared flood insurance maps for every community in the country. These maps outline the flood hazard areas. To order a map of the floodplains in your area, call the Flood Map Distribution Center at 800-333-1363.

Does Floodplain Zoning Affect My Community?

Floodplain zoning is not a federal regulation. If your community wants to be covered by the national flood insurance program, however, it must meet the minimum standards set by FEMA's building codes and zoning ordinances to qualify.

What Action Should My Community Be Taking?

As local official, you need to decide whether your community is at risk for flood damage and if your community could benefit from being a part of the national flood insurance program. You should:

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Nonpoint Source Pollution

Nonpoint source (NPS) pollutants, such as grease and oil from streets and parking lots, pet wastes, lawn fertilizers, pesticides, chemicals from agricultural and industrial sites, and soil from construction sites, can enter ground water and surface waters, causing problems with water quality in your community. NPS pollutants are typically carried over and through the ground by rainfall and snowmelt. Rivers, lakes, estuaries, coastal waters, and wetlands all experience major negative effects as the result of nonpoint source pollution.

NPS pollution is difficult to regulate because it comes from a variety of sources and often results from the ordinary and necessary things that we do, such as farming and building houses. EPA has decided that flexible state and local decision-making is the best way to control NPS pollution. The National Nonpoint Source Program under Section 319 of the Clean Water Act requires states to identify:

How Do NPS Pollution Control Regulations Affect My Community?

Control of NPS pollution is voluntary for most small communities. If NPS pollution is having a major effect on the water quality of your community, it is in your best interest to control the problem. EPA's system for choosing a plan to control NPS pollution is called best management practices (BMPs). BMPs can be cost effective and easy to use if they are prudently applied.

What Action Should My Community Be Taking?

As a local official, you are responsible for finding out if your state has laws regulating NPS pollution. You should:

Where Are the Regulations Published?

The stormwater regulations are contained in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Parts 122 to 124.

You can also contact EPA's Chemical Emergency Preparedness and Prevention Office (CEPP)

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