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Green Power Partnership

The Power of Aggregated Purchasing: How to Green Your Electricity Supply & Save Money

Tuesday, September 10, 2013
1:00-2:00 pm (EDT)
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Green Power Partnership

On Tuesday, September 10, 2013, from 1:00 - 2:00 pm (EDT), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Green Power Partnership (GPP) hosted a webinar on "The Power of Aggregated Purchasing: How to Green Your Electricity Supply & Save Money." The use of an aggregated model for renewable energy purchases can lead to significant energy, environmental and financial benefits by addressing administrative cost barriers and leveraging the shared purchasing power of multiple organizations. By pooling their purchasing power, many organizations have been able to secure competitive renewable electricity supply at lower cost as compared to conventional sources.

The webinar examined the aggregated purchasing experiences of the Western Pennsylvania Energy Consortium and the Nonprofit Energy Alliance, including lessons learned and best practices for organizations interested in using an aggregated model. The Consortium, a municipal electricity purchasing group, has seen electricity cost savings of close to 20 percent while increasing green power use to 25 percent among members. The Nonprofit Energy Alliance is a group of nonprofit organizations that have joined together to negotiate for cheaper, greener electricity, resulting in meaningful cost savings and environmental benefits.

Speakers included:

  • Mollie Lemon, Communications Director, EPA's Green Power Partnership
    Presentation (PDF) (10 pp, 2M, About PDF)
  • Jim Sloss, Energy & Utilities Manager, City of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
    Presentation (PDF) (10 pp, 488KB)
  • Hope Burness Gleicher, Director, Nonprofit Montgomery
  • Suzan Jenkins, Chief Executive Officer, Arts & Humanities Council of Montgomery County
    Presentation (PDF) (13 pp, 551KB)

To request an audio recording of the webinar, send an email to Mollie Lemon (lemon.mollie@epa.gov).

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