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Ports

Diesel boats and ships, which range from small recreational runabouts to large ocean-going vessels, are significant contributors to air pollution in many of our nation's cities and ports. The Midwest Clean Diesel Initiative also addresses support equipment that handles goods being shipped. Although marine diesel engines produced today must meet relatively modest emission requirements, they continue to emit large amounts of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulate matter (PM), both of which contribute to serious public health problems.

Ports and Shipping

Additional Resources


Background:

In May 2004, as part of the Clean Air Nonroad Diesel Rule, EPA finalized new requirements for nonroad diesel fuel that will decrease the allowable levels of sulfur in fuel used in marine vessels by at least 90 percent from current levels. These fuel improvements will create immediate and significant environmental and public health benefits by reducing particulate matter from existing engines.

In a separate coinciding action, EPA announced its intent to propose more stringent emission standards for all new commercial, recreational, and auxiliary marine diesel engines except the very large engines used for propulsion on deep-sea vessels. These standards, modeled after the Clean Air Nonroad Diesel engines program, would require advanced emission control technologies similar to those for heavy-duty diesel trucks and buses. EPA estimates that NOx and PM emissions could be reduced by 90 percent from current standards by applying such advanced technology to these marine diesel engines.


Ports and Shipping:

The Great Lakes/St. Lawrence Seaway System extends from Montreal to Lake Erie. Over 90 percent of the Seaway traffic is made up of bulk cargoes such as wheat and other grains, iron ore, coals, chemicals and oil. In 2003, over 150,000 tons of freight were transported on the Great Lakes. (Reference #1) Link to the Great Lakes/St. Lawrence Seaway System's Exit EPA Disclaimer website for more information.

In Region 5, there are 59 Great Lakes ports and 848 river ports. (Reference #1 & 2) Over 1,500 diesel-powered waterborne vessels carry freight on the region's waterways.

Seven of the 10 major ports in Great Lakes Region are located in non-attainment areas for ozone and/or particulate matter. Region 5 Map of ten major ports found in the Great Lakes Region (PDF). (559K, 1page, About PDF)


Exit EPA Disclaimer Below are links to other Web sites that may have useful information about the events listed. These links are provided for convenience only and no endorsement by EPA is intended. By visiting these non-EPA sites, you leave the domain of EPA and assume the responsibility for any aspect of these sites and for information that you use from these sites. Information contained on these sites can in no way be assumed to replace EPA guidance or policies.

Ports in Nonattainment Areas (By State)

Other Great Lakes Ports & Region 5 River Ports (By State)

References:

  1. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. "Waterborne Commerce of the United States. Part 3 - Waterways and Harbors Great Lakes." Calendar 2003.
  2. Marine Transportation System Task Force. "An Assessment of the U.S. Marine Transportation System." September 1999.

Diesel Emission Reduction Opportunities

Marine vessels emit large amounts of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and particulate matter (PM). Marine emissions at ports are generally classified as non-road mobile source emissions. Marine emissions are primarily from diesel engines operating on ocean-going vessels, tugs and tows, dredges, and other vessels operating within a port area. In addition, there are land-based port emission sources which include yard tractors, cranes, container handles, forklifts, heavy duty trucks and locomotives operating within a port area. To find more information, visit the Midwest Clean Diesel Initiative's Technologies Webpage.


Projects:

Port of Cleveland Land-Based Equipment Retrofit Project (PDF, 1 page, 386 K About PDF).


Additional Resources:


Below are links to other web sites that may have useful information about Port-related activities. These links are provided for convenience only and no endorsement by EPA is intended. By visiting these non-EPA sites, you leave the domain of EPA and assume the responsibility for any aspect of these sites and for information that you use from these sites. Information contained on these sites can in no way be assumed to replace EPA guidance or policies. Exit EPA Disclaimer



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