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2011

EPA Awards $5.5 Million to Support Nanotechnology Health Risk Research
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, in collaboration with the UK Natural Environment Research Council, has awarded $5.5M to support research on nanoscale materials. Three grant awards were made, each to a consortia consisting of a US and a UK team.
[Read More]

2009

Announcement of Intent to Issue an RFA on Fate and Transport of Engineered Nanomaterials in Coordination with the EC
The EPA, NSF, USDA and NIOSH will issue a solicitation entitled "Increasing Scientific Data on the Fate, Transport and Behavior of Engineered Nanomaterials in Selected Environmental and Biological Matrices". The solicitation is expected to open on or before November 1, 2009 and will remain open for 90 days. The solicitation is being coordinated with the following call from the European Commission (EC) published on the 30th of July.
[EC Call] exit EPA

Special Announcement Archive
Announcement of Intent to Issue an RFA on Fate and Transport of Engineered Nanomaterials in Coordination with the EC

The EPA, NSF, USDA and NIOSH will issue a solicitation entitled "Increasing Scientific Data on the Fate, Transport and Behavior of Engineered Nanomaterials in Selected Environmental and Biological Matrices". The solicitation is expected to open on or before November 1, 2009 and will remain open for 90 days. The solicitation is being coordinated with the following call from the European Commission (EC) published on the 30th of July: The EC call reference is: http://cordis.europa.eu/fp7/dc/index.cfm?fuseaction=UserSite.CooperationDetailsCallPage&call_id=276 exit EPA

2008

EPA to partner with U.K. Funding Agencies to Launch Major Joint Research Effort on the Behaviour and Effects of Nanomaterials in the Environment
The Environmental Protection Agency in cooperation with the U.K. Natural Environment Research Council, the U.K. Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council, the U.K. Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, and the U.K. Environment Agency is in the process of finalising a major joint research effort to develop and validate predictive tools and similar conceptual models that predict exposure, bioavailability and effects of manufactured nanomaterials in the environment.
[Read More]

EPA and the United Kingdom Propose Joint Research Effort on Nanomaterials
EPA in cooperation with Natural Environment Research Council, Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council, the Environment Agency and the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs in the United Kingdom and the National Science Foundation in the United States have agreed to develop a joint research effort to explore new approaches to assess the environmental exposure, bioavailability and effects of manufactured nanomaterials.
[Read More]

Killer Clothing Bursts Bad Bacteria
Seven Technologies to Ward Off Disease-Causing Microbes By JENNY CHAN ABC News Medical Unit Oct. 15, 2008 — An article from ABC News interviews researchers developing and evaluating new technologies designed to kill germs (bacteria and viruses) - some of these technologies contain antimicrobial silver nanoparticles. One of the projects cited is funded through an ongoing EPA STAR grant.
[Read More]

Follow the Green Nano Road
Dr. Barbara Karn of USEPA’s National Center for Environmental Research promotes green nanotechnology in an article in the current issue of the Journal of Industrial Ecology. Dr. Karn points out that a combined total of over $9 billion is being spent annually by government and industry, but only 0.6% of this total expenditure ($60 million) is directed toward research for the protection of people and the planet.
[Read More]

Small Technology, Big Questions
Living on Earth_s new series on nanotechnology explores the big questions about some tiny materials. Manipulating matter at the molecular level opens amazing opportunities for new medicines and materials. But these new materials also create potential risks to health and the environment. Jeff Young looks at nanosilver products already on store shelves.
Listen to Audio | Read Transcript


Video screen shot Nano Hazards
Tiny particles of silver designed to kill germs are being put into socks to control odor. But as this ScienCentral News video explains, what happens to that nanosilver later is concerning some scientists.
[Watch Video]


ETUC wants precautionary principle applied to nanotechnologies
June 26, 2008 - Nanotechnology is a fast-growing field of activity in many sectors of industry, especially the chemical, pharmaceutical and electronics industries. As a result, the number of workers coming into contact with nanomaterials – objects whose size is measured in billionths of a metre – is set to rise sharply in the coming years. The ETUC is convinced that nanotechnologies and manufactured nanomaterials might have considerable development and application potential.
[Read More exit EPA]

Safety Studies on Nanoparticles Lag Behind Technology
June 1, 2008 - You can't see them, but they're everywhere, from stain-resistant pants to antibacterial bandages to deflation-proof tennis balls. They're nanoparticles, microscopic substances less than one one-thousandth the width of a human hair.
[Read More exit EPA]

The tiny, Useful Particle That Could Also be a Health ProblemNanosilver Ends up in Sewers, Rivers and Lakes
May 18, 2008 - "The new controversy is, should it be incorporated into sweatshirts and shoes?" wonders Kevin Robbie, a physics professor at Queen's University in Kingston and the Canada Research Chair in Nanostructured Materials. "Generally it's not a very good idea."
[Read More exit EPA]

Nanoparticles Scrutinized for Health Effects
May 12, 2008 - Windows cleaned by raindrops, white sofas immune to red wine spills, tiles protected from limescale buildup - new products created from minute substances called nanoparticles are making such domestic dreams come true.
[Read More exit EPA]

The (Nano)Silver Bullet
May 02, 2008 - Your toothpaste may be a pesticide. So might your electric razor, your computer keyboard, and your child's teddy bear. These products, and scores of others, combine one of the world's oldest disinfectants--silver--with one of its hottest new industries: nanotechnology.
[Read More exit EPA]

Toxic Socks - Silver nanoparticles intended to control odor release in the wash
April 14, 2008, - Arizona State University researchers have found that socks impregnated with odor-fighting silver nanoparticles release the nanoparticles when washed. This study, the first to examine how nanoparticles are released from commercially available clothing raises concerns about silver particles leaching into wastewater and the environment.
[Read More exit EPA]

Nanoparticles Leaching into Environment
April 10, 2008 - Scientists are raising alarms about toxic nanoparticles being woven into fabrics as "odor neutralizers" in socks and as antibacterial agents in bandages.
[Read More exit EPA]

Nanotech Raises 'Toxic Sock' Alert
April 10, 2008 - The smell from your socks might not be the only toxic thing around, a US chemistry conference has heard. Silver nanoparticles, used for years to kill bacteria and eliminate odours in socks, food containers, medical dressings and even teddy bears, might be a threat to the environment, according to new research.
[Read More exit EPA]

Stinky Sock Treatment May Pose Eco Hazard
April 9, 2008 - The smell from your socks might not be the only toxic thing around. Silver nanoparticles, used for years to kill bacteria and eliminate odors in socks, food containers, medical dressings and even teddy bears, might be a threat to the environment, according to new research.
[Read More exit EPA]

Die Spur der Silbersocke
April 8, 2008 (Germany) - Die Forschungsobjekte, mit denen sich Troy Benn von der Arizona State University in seiner Doktorarbeit beschäftigt, hat er im Kaufhaus besorgt: Socken - sechs verschiedene Marken. Die Textilien haben aber alle eines gemeinsam: Sie sollen laut Angaben der Hersteller Nanosilber enthalten.
[Read More exit EPA]

Study Warns of the Danger of Nanosilver
April 8, 2008 Bob Hoffman of Political Gateway. Registration required to view article.
[Read More exit EPA]

Big Worries About Micro Particles
April 7, 2008 - The next "it" product is here. Some of you sleep on it. Some of you slap it on cuts. Some of you clean with it. Some babies suck on it. A few people study it, wondering if "it" will be an environmental and health disaster.
[Read More exit EPA]

Tiny Silver Particles in Clothing May Lead to Pollution, Research Suggests
April 7, 2008 - In the unknowns of emerging nanotechnology, researchers are wondering if the science behind trendy no-smell socks, underwear and hunting gear might create unintended consequences in the environment.
[Read More exit EPA]

Small risks
April 7, 2008 - Valued for it’s antibacterial and odour-fighting properties, nanoparticle silver is becoming the star attraction in a range of products from socks to bandages. But now, two US researchers are recommending a closer examination of its consequences to the environment.
[Read More exit EPA]

Nanoparticle Fear Over Anti-Odour Socks
April 7, 2008 - Safety fears were raised yesterday about the use of minute "nanoparticles" of silver to make non smelly socks and infection-fighting bandages.
[Read More exit EPA]

Smelly Sock Treatment Leaks Silver Nanoparticles
April 7, 2008 - Silver nanoparticles added to socks to kill the bacteria associated with smelly feet can easily leak into waste water during washing, a new study reveals.
[Read More exit EPA]

Nanotechnology: A Brave New World Requires Bold New Research Approaches
Nanotechnology opens new worlds of possibilities for important computer, medical and environmental applications. To ensure nanotechnology is developed in a responsible manner, the National Science Foundation (NSF) and EPA awarded $38 million to establish two Centers for the Environmental Implications of Nanotechnology (CEINs).
[Read More]

buckeyball Nanotechnology: The Big News is Small
Americans are famous for building big: the tallest sky scraper, the biggest jet, the widest plasma TV screen. But now U.S. entrepreneurs are considering thinking small. Nanotechnology uses particles 80,000 times smaller than a human hair; yet the new technology has the potential to quickly clean up pollution, cure serious illnesses, and make the computer silicon chip obsolete.
[Read More]

STAR Grantee Develops Potentially Inexpensive Nanotube Solar Technology
Somenath Mitra, along with researchers at the New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT), has developed a potentially cheap solar technology which can be painted or printed on flexible plastic sheets. The benefits could be enormous to the consumer, producer, and the environment.
[Read More]

SBIR logoNanoparticle-Anchored Plasticizers
With support from EPA’s SBIR Program, TDA Research, Inc., developed a system that softens plastics by forming a polymer nanocomposite that does not become brittle and contaminate its surroundings by leaching its plasticizer.
[Read More (PDF) (2 pp, 105K)]

New Approaches to Nanotechnology on NPR
Dr. SchlossTwo representatives from NNI agencies were featured on a National Public Radio Program, produced in Washington, D.C.

Dr. Jeffery Schloss and Dr. Nora Savage.Two representatives from NNI agencies, Jeffery Schloss exit EPA, Co-Chair, Trans-NIH Nano Taskforce, National Institutes of Health and Nora Savage, exit EPA Environmental Engineer, Office of Research & Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency were featured on The Kojo Nnamdi Show exit EPA, a news magazine program on WAMU (88.5 FM), American University Radio in Washington, D.C. [Read More]

Image:  Diallo NWRI Funds Recovery of Metal Ions from Membrane Concentrates by Dendrimer-Enhanced Filtration

Dr. Mamadou Diallo, EPA STAR researcher, is examining to examine the feasibility of removing metals from the leftover wastes of water treatment processes by using a nanotechnology-based technology. This work, funded by the National Water Research Institute represents a furtherance of Diallo's EPA research grant, (R829626) - Dendritic Nanoscale Chelating Agents: Synthesis, Characterization, Molecular Modeling and Environmental Applications, in its last year.

Dendrimers are monodisperse and highly branched nanostructures with controlled composition and architecture. The title of the NWRI project is “Recovery of Metal Ions from Membrane Concentrates by Dendrimer- Enhanced Filtration”. Diallo is currently Director of Molecular Environmental Technology at the Materials and Process Simulation Center of the Beckman Institute at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech), as well as Visiting Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering at Howard University in Washington, DC. An Environmental Engineer with a background in molecular physical chemistry, Diallo states that “The purpose of this research is to merge nanotechnology with water purification processes. It’s a tall order, but it’s also an opportunity to develop a new generation of water purification technologies that can help us remove some of the most difficult-to-remove contaminants.

Cover:  Environmental Science and Technology:  Nanotechnology EPA Scientists Co-Edit Special Journal Issues

Drs. Barbara Karn and Nora Savage have served as co-editors on two recent special journal issues.

Cover: Nanoparticles and Water Quality Karn and Dr. Wei-xian Zhang of Lehigh University are co-editors of a special edition of Environmental Science and Technology published on March 1, 2005. The issue, entitled "Nanotechnology: Special Issue" exit EPA volume 39, number 5, featured twenty-eight (28) articles by prominent researchers in the field on nanotechnology and the environment. A feature article, "Environmentally Responsible Development of Nanotechnology" was written by Dr. Mihail Roco of the National Science Foundation and Chair of the U.S. National Science and Technology Council's subcommittee on Nanoscale Science, Engineering and Technology.

Savage and Dr. Mamadou Diallo of Howard University and the California Institute of Technology are co-editors of a special edition, June 2005, of the Journal of Nanoparticle Research, "Nanoparticles and Water Quality" exit EPA. The issue features an introductory article, co-written by Savage and Diallo, entitled "Nanomaterials and Water Purification: Opportunities and Challenges". There are an additional sixteen (16) articles in this issue on the topic of nanotechnology and water quality.


2007

Pacing Nanotechnology
THE NANOTECHNOLOGY MOVEMENT has engendered an eclectic community of historians, lawyers, communicators, educators, environmentalists, and others in the science, technology, and society (STS) community who prognosticate about nanotechnology's societal implications [Read More]

EPA awards OSU nearly $600,000 for Nanotechnology Safety Research
(Corvallis, Oregon. – June 22, 2007) Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced the award of two grants totaling almost $600,000 to Oregon State University (OSU) for nanotechnology research. These grants will evaluate whether some manmade nanomaterials could be toxic to human health. [Read More]

OSU to Study Nanotech’s Safety
Advances in the field of nanotechnology have resulted in miniscule man-made particles showing up in a vast array of consumer products. In computer equipment, medical and dental compounds, cosmetics — even in stain-guard coatings on fabrics — these nanomaterials promise a multitude of high-tech benefits. The use and development of nanotechnology is expected to grow by leaps and bounds in the next several years. [Read More]

Nanotechnology: Small Parts, Big Deal
(Corvallis, Oregon. – June 22, 2007) Nanotechnology research at Oregon State University just got a big boost. The US Environmental Protection Agency awarded the school two grants, totaling 600-thousand dollars. The research has been criticized in the past for its production, which was harmful to the environment. Researches say now, the grant money will be used with safety as a top priority. [Read More]

Nanotechnology: Small Parts, Big Deal
Photo from article Nanotechnology: Small Parts, Big Deal June 22, 2007
Eugene, Or - Nanotechnology research at Oregon State University just got a big boost. The US Environmental Protection Agency awarded the school two grants, totaling 600-thousand dollars. [Read More]


2003

STAR Grantee Interviewed by the ABC Affiliate News Service
Photo: Nanotechnology October 2, 2003
WASHINGTON - Robots the size of sand? ScienCentral has highlighted nanotechnology research in a web article and video news release called "Tiny Toxin Tracker" which focuses on "smart dust" developed by Dr. Mike Sailor a STAR grantee from the University of California, San Diego. [Read More]

Environmental Tools of the Future, Today: Nanotechnology
Photo: aligned nano tubes January 15, 2003
WASHINGTON (NCER) - Nanotechnology is an exciting new science that is receiving more and more attention. EPA's Science to Achieve Results (STAR) grant program has given 16 universities almost $6 million to study this emerging technology. Through its Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program the Agency has financed almost $1 million more in nano research. [Read More]

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