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United States - Mexico Border Program

The EPA Office of Emergency Management (OEM) administers programs jointly with Mexico to prepare for and prevent environmental emergencies along the southern border of the United States.

 
Group Description

Joint Response Team (JRT)

OEM's Deputy Director serves as the U.S. Co-chair of the Joint Response Team along with a representative from the Secretariat for the Environment and Natural Resources-Procuraduría Federal de Protección al Ambiente in Mexico, and a representative from the Office of Civil Protection, Dirección General de Protección Civil , within Mexico's Secretariat of Government. In addition, the JRT includes U.S. and Mexican state, Tribal, and local offices responsible for emergency prevention, preparedness, and response in the inland border. The JRT is responsible for the maintenance and revision of the Mexico-United States Joint Contingency Plan. The JRT also promotes the preparation, maintenance, revision, and exercises of the joint Sister City contingency plans that will ensure emergency preparedness at the local level.

On this page you will find information about:

You will need Adobe Acrobat Reader, available as a free download, to view some of the files on this page. See EPA's PDF page to learn more about PDF, and for a link to the free Acrobat Reader.

Note: To order a paper copy of any of the documents on these pages, contact the National Service Center for Environmental Publications (NSCEP) at 1-800-490-9198.

U.S.-Mexico Joint Contingency Plan

The U.S.-Mexico Joint Contingency Plan provides a mechanism for cooperation between the United States and Mexico for preparedness for, and response to, polluting incidents that cause or may cause, damage to the environment along the inland border area of both countries, or may constitute a threat to the public safety/security, health and welfare, the environment, or property. It also facilitates for the provision of assistance when only one country is affected, but the polluting incident is of such magnitude as to justify a request for assistance from the other country.

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2011 US-Mexico National Coordinators Meeting (NCM)

NPPD participated in the US-Mexico Border 2012 NCM by planning and coordinating two meetings with its' Emergency Preparedness and Response Border-wide Workgroup regional and Mexican counterparts in San Antonio, Texas, May 10-11. Agenda items discussed included the development of a workgroup charter containing roles and responsibilities of JRT members as described in the Mexico-US Joint Contingency Plan, the drafting of an annual workplan so that planned events, meetings, training and exercises can be communicated in advance, the update of the bi-national incident notification protocol, the US & Mexico risk assessment analysis report and the planning of upcoming capacity building events for 2011-2012. The possibility of organizing video conferences every three months, in addition to new sub-objectives for the new generation of the US-MX Border Program 2020 were also in the very busy two-day agenda.

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Sister City Agreements - Cross Border Contingency Plans

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U.S.-Mexico Inland Joint Response Team Meeting

2009 US-Mexico Joint Response Team (JRT) Meeting, Sept. 1, South Padre Island, Texas

The Office of Emergency Management (OEM)'s National Planning & Preparedness Division (NPPD), along with EPA's Regions 6, 9, in addition to our Mexican counterparts, PROFEPA and Civil Protection, planned, organized and coordinated the 2009 JRT meeting, in South Padre Island, Texas on Tuesday, Sept. 1 Annex II of the 1983 La Paz Agreement on Cooperation for the Protection and Improvement of the Environment in the Border Area established the U.S.-Mexico Joint Contingency Plan (JCP) to provide a bi-national coordination mechanism for protecting human health and the environment and responding to significant hazardous substances contingencies or emergencies that affect the inland border area between the U.S. and Mexico. The La Paz Agreement also established the JRT which has coordinating authorities for both Mexico and the U.S. The JRT includes representatives from U.S. and Mexican federal, state, and local agencies responsible for emergency prevention, preparedness, and response in the Border Region. During the Sept. 1, 2009 meeting, the attendance included not only the above representatives, but also members of industry, representing some of the local border maquiladoras, with a total number of over 100 attendees. EPA's Region 6 and 9 participated with NPPD in the planning and logistics for this successful and well received meeting, along with OEM's Mexican counterparts, PROFEPA and Civil Protection. Some of the agenda topics included discussions of on-going initiatives, recent accomplishments and lessons learned, recent planning, capacity building, training, exercises as well as the upcoming priorities and projects for 2009-2010 to enhance cross-border collaborations, increase preparedness and risk reduction.

San Diego, California, February 15, 2006

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Hazardous Material Commodity Flow Studies

Hazardous Material Commodity Flow Study: Calexico, California Area (February 2001) (PDF) (69 pp, 3MB)
A commodity flow study is an analysis of the goods that are moving through a particular area. The study describes the identity and quantity of hazardous materials traveling through Calexico, and provides recommendations for reducing risks that these materials pose to the community. The study identifies the nature, quantities, and routes of hazardous substances transported in or near Calexico, including exports to and imports from Mexico.

NOTE: This is a large document that may require a longer downloading time. This document is summarized in the Calexico Hazardous Material Commodity Flow Study Fact Sheet (PDF). (4 pp, 21K)

Hazardous Material Commodity Flow Study: San Diego, California Area (June 2001) (PDF) (84 pp, 1.7MB)
A commodity flow study is an analysis of the goods that are moving through a particular area. The study describes the identity and quantity of hazardous materials traveling through San Diego, and provides recommendations for reducing risks that these materials pose to the community. The study identifies the nature, quantities, and routes of hazardous substances transported in or near San Diego, including exports to and imports from Mexico.

NOTE: This is a large document that may require a longer downloading time. This document is summarized in the San Diego Hazardous Material Commodity Flow Study Fact Sheet (PDF). (4 pp, 21K)

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Additional Resources

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