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EPA Makes Available Information Collection Request for Revised Second List of Chemicals for Endocrine Disruptor Screening

For Release: June 14, 2013

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is initiating a 30-day public review and sending to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) the Information Collection Request (ICR) for collecting data for a second list of chemicals that will be screened for their potential to interact with the endocrine systems of humans and wildlife. Concurrently, the EPA is making available the list of chemicals covered by the ICR and related policies and procedures for collecting data. The ICR estimates the burden imposed by requesting data on these chemicals.

This is the first time that non-pesticide commercial chemicals will be identified for endocrine screening. This second list of chemicals for endocrine disruptor screening includes 109 chemicals (68 are commercial chemicals and 41 are pesticide active ingredients); 20 of the commercial chemicals found in sources of drinking water are also on the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) Work Plan Chemicals list for further assessment.

The submission of the ICR to OMB is a step in a multi-step process that will culminate in the issuance of orders requesting screening data under the Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program (EDSP) as early as this September. A 30-day public comment period has begun on the ICR. The second list of chemicals for endocrine disruptor screening and related policies and procedures for issuing orders will be provided to assist in the review of the ICR. Subsequent to the public comment period, OMB will initiate their review process. Following its review, the EPA may begin issuing orders to pesticide and chemical manufacturers and importers for these chemicals.

The EPA is committed to more fully understanding the potential risks of chemicals that may affect endocrine systems by screening pesticides and other chemicals for their potential effects on estrogen, androgen and thyroid hormone systems. The pesticides were selected based on their registration review schedule and the commercial chemicals were selected based on their potential to be found in sources of drinking water to which a substantial population may be exposed.

In 1996, Congress passed the Food Quality Protection Act and the Safe Drinking Water Act Amendments requiring the EPA to screen pesticide chemicals and drinking water contaminants for their potential to produce effects similar to those produced by the female hormones (estrogen) in humans. The EPA also has authority to screen certain other chemicals to identify other endocrine effects. The EDSP also evaluates chemical effects on male hormones (androgens) in the human thyroid system and effects on wildlife. The program utilizes a two-tiered screening and testing strategy to determine whether a chemical has the “potential” to interact with the endocrine system and to conduct studies that provide information on interaction of that chemical with the endocrine system and the dose response relationship.

The Agency’s ICR, the second list of chemicals covered by the ICR, and related policies and procedures for issuing orders are available in the highlights box at http://www.epa.gov/endo/index.htm.

More information on the Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program: http://www.epa.gov/endo/.

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