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Brantley County, Georgia

Information provided for informational purposes only

Note: This information is provided for reference purposes only. Although the information provided here was accurate and current when first created, it is now outdated.

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Pesticide Table for the Hairy Rattleweed | Pesticide Table for the Wood Stork
About the Hairy Rattleweed | About the Wood Stork
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Pesticide Table for the Hairy Rattleweed

Active Ingredient Code
AMITROLE (Amitrol)
29
CACODYLIC ACID (Cotton Aide HC, Phytar)
29
DAZOMET (Basamid, Mylone)
29
DICHLOBENIL (Casoron, Dyclomec, Norosac)
29
EPTC (Eptam)
29
FOSAMINE-AMMONIUM (Krenite)
29
GLYPHOSATE (Roundup, Accord, Rodeo)
29
METRIBUZIN (Lexone, Sencor)
29
OXYFLUORFEN (Goal)
17b
SIMAZINE (Princep)
29
SULFOMETURON METHYL (Oust)
32a

Limitations on Pesticide Use

Code Limitations
17b Do not apply this pesticide in the species' primary habitat (described under the Shading Key). For ground applications do not apply within 100 yards of the habitat, nor within 1/4 mile for aerial applications.
29 Do not apply this pesticide in the species' primary habitat (described under the Shading Key). For ground applications do not apply within 20 yards of the habitat, nor within 100 yards for aerial applications.
32a Do not apply this pesticide on rights-of-way in the species' primary habitat (described under the Shading Key).

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Pesticide Table for the Wood Stork

Active Ingredient Code
4-AMINOPYRIDINE (Avitrol)
19
ACEPHATE (Orthene)
19
ALDICARB (Temik)
19
AZINPHOS-METHYL (Guthion)
19a
CARBOFURAN (Furadan)
19a
CHLORPYRIFOS (Lorsban)
19
DIAZINON (Diazinon)
19
DICHLORVOS (Prentox, Elastrel)
19
DICROTOPHOS (Bidrin)
19
ENDOSULFAN (Thiodan)
19a
ETHOPROP (Mocap)
19
FENAMIPHOS (Nemacur)
19
FENTHION (Baytex)
19
FONOFOS (Dyfoante)
19
ISOFENPHOS (Oftanol)
19
METHYL PARATHION (Penncap-M)
19
MEVINPHOS (Phosdrin)
19
OXAMYL (Vydate L)
19
PARAQUAT (Gramoxone, Starfire)
19
PHORATE (Thimet)
19
TEMEPHOS (Abate, Tempo)
19

Limitations on Pesticide Use

Code Limitations
19 Do not apply this pesticide in the species' primary habitat (described under the Shading Key), within 40 yards of the water's edge for ground applications, nor within 200 yards for aerial applications.
19a Do not apply this pesticide in the species' primary habitat (described under the Shading Key), within 100 yards of the water's edge for ground applications, nor within 1/4 mile for aerial applications.

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Hairy rattleweed [Baptista arachnifera]

Hairy rattleweed, also known as hairy wild indigo, is a perennial legume with stems up to 32 inches and heart-shaped leaves. Except for the five-petaled, yellow flowers the entire plant is covered with tiny hairs. The blooming period is from June to August. It's habitat is restricted to low sandy ridges in open pine-palmetto woods where the soil traps and holds moisture. This type of habitat insures the plant's need for light, moisture and low competition.

Historically, this species was fairly widespread along Georgia's lower coastal plain where populations were supported in sandy, well drained broad terraces known as flatwoods. Currently this species occurs in a few sites in Wayne County, with some extension into Brantley County.

Most of the lands within the rattleweed's range are managed pine plantations and the logging activities that use heavy machinery have led to it's decline. Another major reason for decline has been the supression of fire within the habitat leading to heavy undergrowth and competition. The main insect feeder is the North American weevil which lays eggs in the flower buds. The larvae feed on the developingn seeds.

Survival of the rattle weed depends on finding the proper combination of foresting techniques that would allow the plant to thrive.

Matthews, J.R. (ed.), The Official World Wildlife Fund Guide to Endangered Species, Beacham Publishing Inc, Washington, DC. Vol I, pp. 57-58.

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Wood Stork [Mycteria americana]

The wood stork is a large, long-legged wading bird with a heavy, down-curved bill. It has an unfeathered head and sports white plumage elswhere with black flight feathers and tail. It is the only true stork in the United States. It nests in the tops of cypress trees growing in water and is highly gregarious. The stork feeds primarily on small fishes it catches with its beak.

Historically, there were 60,000 wood breeding pairs along the Gulf Coast from Florida to Texas and along the Atlantic Coast from Florida to South Carolina (1930 estimate). In 1980, the number of breeding pairs was estimated at 4,800. Currently, rookeries are restricted to Florida, Georgia and South Carolina.

Major factors affecting the wood stork are disturbance of their feeding areas by urban development and predation by raccoon predation.

Primary recovery efforts focus on the development of artificial foraging areas in areas where the stork's natural froaging area has been destroyed.

Matthews, J.R. (ed.), The Official World Wildlife Fund Guide to Endangered Species, Beacham Publishing Inc, Washington, DC. Vol II, pp. 653-655.

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