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Harney County, Oregon

Information provided for informational purposes only

Note: This information is provided for reference purposes only. Although the information provided here was accurate and current when first created, it is now outdated.

How to Use this Information
Pesticide Table for Malheur Wire-Lettuce | About Malheur Wire-Lettuce
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Malheur Wire-Lettuce
Table of Pesticide Active Ingredients

Active Ingredient Code
2,4-D 28
2,4-D (ESTERS, SALTS, AMINES) 28
AMMONIUM SULFAMATE 28
ATRAZINE 28
DICAMBA 28
DICHLORPROP (2,4-DP) 28
DIMETHYLOMINE DICAMBA 28
HEXAZINONE 28
MCPA, ACID 28
MCPA (AMINES) 28
MCPA (SALTS) 28
METRIBUZIN 32
OXYFLOURFEN 33
PARAQUAT 28
PICLORAM 28
POTASSIUM PICLORAM 28
SODIUM DICAMBA 28
SULFOMETHURON-METYL 32
TEBUTHIURON 28
TRIETHYLAMINE PICLORAM 28

Limitations On Pesticide Use

Code Limitations
28 Do not apply within 100 yards of species habitat for aerial applications or within 20 yards of species habitat for ground applications.
32 Do not apply on rights-of-way within species habitat.
33 Do not apply within one-quarter mile of species habitat.
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Malheur wire lettuce [Stephanomeria malheurensis]

Malheur wire lettuce is a herbaceous annual that reaches up to 20 inches in height. It has numerous scale like leaves at its base and abundant pink to white, although sometimes yellow orange, flowers that appear in July and August. The habitat for this species is dry hillsides with sparse scrub vegetation and grasses, in volcanic derived soil often overlain with limestone.

Malheur wire lettuce is only found at a single site near Malheur National Wildlife Refuge in Harney County, Oregon on land that is managed by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM). In 1975, approximately 35,000 plants were found in the area. However, a 1980 population estimate recorded only a few dozen plants. This significant decline was attributed to the non-native cheat grass that encroached much of its habitat. Black-tailed jackrabbits have also affected the plants by feeding on seedlings and affecting reproductive success.

Sixty-five hectares (160 acres) have been designated as Critical Habitat for the species and now serves as a Scientific Study Area. Scientists managing this area control cheat grass and keep jackrabbit populations under control. In addition, the Anaconda Minerals Company, which leases mining claims in the area, is working with the Fish and Wildlife Service and the BLM to prevent disturbance by off-road vehicles and to conserve the species.

Matthews, J.R. (ed.), The Official World Wildlife Fund Guide to Endangered Species Vol.II, Beacham Publishing Inc, Washington, DC. pp. 388-389.

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