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Current as of March 2013

EPA Moves to Ban 12 D-Con Mouse and Rat Control Products

EPA is taking action to cancel and remove from the consumer market 12 D-Con brand mouse and rat poison products. These products fail to comply with safety measures that EPA asked registrants to adopt by June 2011 and that are necessary to protect children, pets and wildlife from accidental exposure to rodent baits used in and around the home.

For further information:

Rodenticide Products that Reduce Exposure to Children, Pets and Wildlife

The rodenticide products listed in the link below meet EPA’s new, more protective risk reduction standards. When used as directed by the label, these products can help consumers control household rodents while greatly reducing accidental exposure to children, pets, and wildlife. EPA will update this list of products as more rodenticide products meeting current risk mitigation standards are approved.

Some D-Con Products Unsafe

Twelve D-Con mouse and rat poison products produced by Reckitt Benckiser, Inc. fail to comply with safety measures that EPA asked rodenticide producers to adopt by June 2011 and that are necessary to protect children, pets and wildlife from accidental exposure. In January 2013, the EPA initiated regulatory action to remove those products from the market. See Cancellation Process for 12 D-Con Mouse and Rat Poison Products.

Changes in Household Rodenticide Products

Since 2011, new, more protective household rodenticides, or mouse and rat poison bait products, have been coming on the market. EPA has been working with the manufacturers to ensure that a variety of rodenticide products meeting the Agency’s current risk reduction standards are available to consumers. The new products offer consumers a range of choices in terms of weather resistance, tamper resistance, and price. These products are effective tools in controlling household rodents. With the new risk mitigation features, they offer the advantage of increased protection for children, pets, and non-target wildlife.

EPA's New Risk Reduction Standards

As a result of EPA’s May 2008 Risk Mitigation Decision for Ten Rodenticides, the agency asked rodenticide producers to adopt new safety measures by June 2011.

Choosing a Bait Station for Household Use

A variety of rodenticide products are available that meet EPA’s new risk reduction standards. These new products offer consumers a range of choices in terms of price and resistance to children, dogs, and weather. Four groups or “tiers” of bait stations offer varying degrees of tamper- and weather-resistance. This approach allows consumers to select rodenticide bait stations that best suit their household needs.

Producers of Tier I - III rodenticide bait stations have submitted test results that demonstrate the bait stations’ level of tamper resistance. As a result, bait station products in tiers I – III are expected to prevent children’s access to bait. For more information on bait station testing protocols, please see Attachments A, B and C of the May 2008 Risk Mitigation Decision for Ten Rodenticides.


Rodenticide Bait Stations and Levels of Tamper- and Weather-Resistance
  Tier 1 Tier 2 Tier 3 Tier 4
Resistant to Children yes yes yes no
Resistant to Dogs yes yes no no
Resistant to Outdoor Weather yes no no no
Resistant to Indoor Conditions yes yes yes yes


Which Bait Station is Right for You?

  1. Do you have pre-school aged children?

    If yes, use a rodenticide product that includes a Tier I, Tier II, or Tier III bait station.

    For a bait station to claim Tier I, Tier II, or Tier III, the applicant must provide EPA the results of tamper-resistance testing that demonstrate the bait station device is secure enough, when used as labeled, to likely prevent a pre-school aged child’s access to the rodenticide bait. The child tamper resistance testing must follow Agency testing guidelines and results are reviewed for acceptability by Agency staff.

  2. Do you have pets?

    If yes, use a rodenticide product that includes a Tier I or Tier II bait station.

    For a bait station to claim Tier I or Tier II, the manufacturer must provide EPA the results of tamper-resistance testing that demonstrate the bait station device is secure enough, when used as labeled, to likely prevent a dog from accessing the rodenticide bait. While no rodenticide bait is used in the dog testing, the testing must be conducted with dogs that weigh at least 60 pounds. The dog tamper resistance testing must follow Agency testing guidelines. The test results are reviewed for acceptability by Agency staff.

  3. Do you need to use the bait station outside (within 50 feet of a building, defined as a structure that possesses walls and a roof)?

    If yes, use a rodenticide product that includes a Tier I bait station.

    For a bait station to claim Tier I, the applicant must provide EPA the results of weather-resistance testing that demonstrate weather such as rain will not compromise the integrity of the bait station device and the security of the rodenticide bait, when used as labeled. The weather-resistance testing must follow Agency testing guidelines and the results are reviewed for acceptability by Agency staff.

  4. Do you need to use the bait station in wet conditions (i.e., basements that flood, greenhouse, and other wet settings)?

    If yes, use a rodenticide product that includes a Tier I bait station.

    For a bait station to claim Tier I, the applicant must provide EPA the results of weather-resistance testing demonstrating that elements such as water will not compromise the integrity of the bait station device and the security of the rodenticide bait, when used as labeled. The weather resistance testing must follow Agency testing guidelines, and the results are reviewed for acceptability by Agency staff.

Other Ways to Control Rodents in and Around the Home

In addition to rodenticide baits, rodent control products that do not contain pesticides, such as spring traps, are also available to consumers to control mice and rats. Integrated pest management (IPM) techniques, including steps to prevent, identify and treat pest infestations, are essential to effective management of rodents in residential areas.

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