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You are here: EPA Home » DfE » Chapter 7: Process Cost Estimates

Chapter 7: Process Cost Estimates

Table of Contents for Chapter 7
  • SUMMARY
  • 7.1  SUMMARY OF TECHNOLOGIES AND COST ELEMENTS MODELED
  • 7.2  ASSUMPTIONS AND COST ESTIMATION METHODOLOGY
    • 7.2.1 Clothes Cleaning Plant Capacity
    • 7.2.2 Equipment Capacity
    • 7.2.3 Capital Equipment Costs
    • 7.2.4 Equipment Maintenance Costs
    • 7.2.5 Energy Costs
    • 7.2.6 Installation Costs
    • 7.2.7 Solvent and Other Material Costs
    • 7.2.8 Filters/Cleaning Supplies
    • 7.2.9 Hazardous Waste Disposal Costs
    • 7.2.10 Regulatory Compliance
    • 7.2.11 Labor Costs
  • 7.3  COST ESTIMATES FOR PCE MACHINE CONFIGURATIONS
    • 7.3.1 PCE Transfer with No Carbon Adsorption or Refrigerated Condenser (PCE-A1)
    • 7.3.2 PCE Transfer with Carbon Adsorber (PCE-A2)
    • 7.3.3 PCE Transfer with Refrigerated Condenser (PCE-A3)
    • 7.3.4 PCE Dry-to-Dry with No Carbon Adsorption or Refrigerated Condenser (PCE-B1)
    • 7.3.5 PCE Dry-to-Dry with Carbon Adsorber (PCE-B2)
    • 7.3.6 PCE Dry-to-Dry Converted to Closed-Loop (PCE-B3)
    • 7.3.7 PCE Dry-to-Dry Closed-Loop with no Carbon Adsorber or with Door Fan and Small Carbon Adsorber (PCE-C)
    • 7.3.8 PCE Dry-to-Dry Closed-Loop with Unvented Integral Secondary Carbon Adsorber (PCE-D)
  • 7.4  COST ESTIMATES FOR HYDROCARBON SOLVENT MACHINE CONFIGURATIONS
    • 7.4.1 HC Transfer Machine with Standard Dryer and No Condenser (HC-A1)
    • 7.4.2 HC Transfer Machine with Recovery Dryer (HC-A2)
    • 7.4.3 HC Dry-to-Dry Closed-Loop with Refrigerated Condenser (HC-B)
  • 7.5  COST ESTIMATES FOR MACHINE WETCLEANING
  • REFERENCES

Download the PDF version of Chapter 7 in its entirety [106K].

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SUMMARY

The costs of running a professional clothes cleaning business include rent, basic operating expenses, equipment, and labor. The equipment capacity, equipment type, and the location of the facility will affect the costs and economic viability of a professional cleaning operation. While some fabricare technologies have been in use for many years, others are still prototypes and have not yet been commercially marketed. As manufacturers gain expertise with new machines, and their production quantities increase, it is expected that there will be a decrease in the cost of production of new machines relative to established technologies and therefore a decrease in the cost of these options to fabricare operators (Pindyck and Rubinfeld, 1989).

This chapter focuses on the evaluation of a subset of costs associated with using fabricare technologies. Section 7.1 provides an introduction to the technologies and cost elements that have been included in the cost estimations that follow. Section 7.2 describes the methodology and assumptions used to estimate the cost components in this chapter. In Sections 7.3, 7.4, and 7.5, operational cost estimates are provided for the various fabricare process options. The analyses presented in this chapter should be regarded as a general guide for cost comparisons.

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