Jump to main content.


Removals from the Master Testing List

Note: EPA no longer updates this information, but it may be useful as a reference or resource.


Since formal issuance of the last MTL in 1992, more than 100 chemical substances have been removed from the MTL for a variety of reasons. The primary reason for removal is that EPA has received, reviewed and accepted the results of all required or agreed-upon testing. This is the case for more than 70 chemicals removed from the MTL since 1992. The list of all of the chemicals removed from the MTL and the rationale for their removal is found in INDEX II. The following discussion provides a brief overview of the individual chemicals and chemical categories that have been removed from the MTL since 1992 because they completed their respective testing programs.

Twenty-one (21) chemicals have completed their testing programs under TSCA Section 4 Final Rule-Making (FRM), including:

Nine (9) chemicals tested as the result of EPA's TSCA Section 4 Halogenated Dioxins/Furans Test Rule:

Ten (10) chemicals formally designated for testing by the TSCA Interagency Testing Committee (ITC):

Two (2) chemicals (1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane and 1,3,5- trimethylbenzene) from EPA's TSCA Section 4 Office of Drinking Water Test Rule.

Seven (7) chemicals have completed their testing programs under TSCA Section 4 Enforceable Consent Agreements (ECA), including 6 chemicals that were formally designated by the ITC for testing under Section 4 of TSCA:

Forty-nine (49) chemicals have completed their testing programs as the result of Voluntary Testing Agreements (VTA) including:

All of the data from completed chemical testing programs are referred for disposition to EPA's TSCA Existing Chemicals Program "Risk Management" (RM) process. 

  Diagram of the RM process.

For information about public participation in the TSCA Chemical Testing Program (including information concerning public access to chemical testing data).

  Participating in the TSCA Chemical Testing Program



Local Navigation


Jump to main content.