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Stormwater Management Research

Picture of flood water.
Water Runoff from Flooding

Stormwater management is an important part of a sustainable water infrastructure. Stormwater runoff is produced when rain and snowmelt flows over land or hard surfaces - not soaking into the ground. Much of the urban and suburban surfaces are covered by buildings and pavement. These places rely on storm drains to carry large amounts of water runoff to nearby waterways. The stormwater runoff carries pollutants such as:

  • sediment,
  • oil, grease, and toxic chemicals from motor vehicles,
  • road salt,
  • heavy metals from roof shingles, motor vehicles and other sources,
  • thermal pollution from dark impervious surfaces (streets and roof tops),
  • improperly disposed of household chemicals,
  • dirt, pesticides, and lawn fertilizers from yards,
  • pet wastes,
  • improperly sited, designed and maintained septic systems
  • vehicle emissions, and
  • viruses and bacteria

directly to streams, rivers, and coastal waters. They can seriously harm water quality. The resulting rush of stormwater discharge can also cause:

  • water infrastructure damage,
  • downstream flooding,
  • property damage,
  • stream bank and streambed erosion,
  • averse affect on habitats and wildlife, and
  • human illness.

Stormwater management research addresses these concerns through a variety of techniques, including strategic site design, measures to control the sources of runoff, and thoughtful landscape planning.

References and Products

Performance Testing of Best Management Practices (PDF) (2 pp, 312 Kb) Publication No. EPA/600/F-09/037.

Performance Evaluation Of Best Management Practices Monitoring and Sampling Data (PDF) (2 pp, 198 Kb) Publication No. 600/F-09/032.

Rowe, A., M. Borst, T. O'Connor, and E. Stander. (2010) “Monitoring of the Permeable Pavement Demonstration Site at the Edison Environmental Center.” Presentation, ASCE/EWRI 2010 International Low-Impact Development Conference, San Francisco, California, April 11–16.

Rowe, A., M. Borst, T. O'Connor, and E. Stander. (2010). Permeable Pavement Demonstration at the Edison Environmental Center.” Presentation, ASCE EWRI International Low-Impact Development Conference, San Francisco, California, April 11–14.

US EPA Regional Science Workshop on Stormwater Management – Final Report (PDF) (60 pp, 744 KB) In: Proceedings Edison, New Jersey, October 20–29, 2009. Abstract

Borst, M., T. O'Connor, A. Rowe, and E. Stander. (2009). “Permeable Pavement Demonstration at the Edison Environmental Center.” Poster presentation, SAB Review, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, November 10.

Rowe A., M. Borst, T. O'Connor, and E. Stander. (2009). “Permeable Pavement Demonstration at the Edison Environmental Center.” In: Proceedings International Erosion Control Association Northeast Chapter Annual Conference, Hartford, Connecticut, October 27–29.

Rowe, A., M. Borst, T. O'Connor, and E. Stander. (2009). “Permeable Pavement Demonstration at the Edison Environmental Center.” Presentation, Conference and Trade Show, Northeast Chapter, International Erosion Control Association, Hartford, Connecticut, October 27–28.

Rowe, A. (2009). “Permeable Pavement Demonstration Site at Edison Environmental Center.” Presentation, 2010 International Low-Impact Development Conference, San Francisco, California, April 11–14.

BMP Modeling Concepts and Simulation (PDF) (166 pp, 2.6 MB) (EPA/600/R-06/033) July 2006 – Abstract
This report analyzes several modeling methods to evaluate best management practice (BMP) performance with the intention of facilitating the integration of improved BMP modeling methods into EPA Stormwater Management Model (SWMM). Several other models are examined as part of this study. Options for enhancement of SWMM’s LID simulation capabilities are also presented. This report is an example of the EPA watershed management research products produced at the Edison Urban Watershed Management Facility.

 

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