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2000-2001 Pesticide Market Estimates: Usage (Page 3)

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Table of ContentsIntroductionSalesUsageProducers & UsersHistorical DataGlossary

Sections: 3.1-3.3 | 3.4-3.6 | 3.7-3.8 | 3.9-3.10

3.7  Most Commonly Used Conventional Pesticide Active Ingredients in the U.S. Non-Agricultural Market Sectors

Table 3.7 and Table 3.8 show the ten most commonly used conventional pesticide active ingredients in the two non-agricultural sectors (home & garden and industry/commercial/ government) in both 2001 and 1999. In both sectors, 2,4-D was the most used active ingredient, with between eight and eleven million pounds used in the home and garden sector (see Table 3.7), and between 16 and 18 million pounds used in the industry/commercial/ government sector (see Table 3.8). Seven of the top ten in the home and garden sector are herbicides and three are insecticides. Six of the top ten in the industry/commercial/government sector are herbicides, two are fungicides, and two are insecticides. As noted in Table 3.8, due to the fact that some applicators apply pesticide in both markets, there may be some usage reported in one market that may have occurred in the other. The rankings rely on the estimated amount used of conventional pesticides in the nonagricultural sector taken from EPA proprietary databases.

Table 3.7
Most Commonly Used Conventional
Pesticide Active Ingredients
Home and Garden Market Sector, 2001 and 1999 Estimates
(Ranked by Range in Millions of Pounds of Active Ingredient)

Active Ingredient Type
2001
1999
 
Rank Range Rank Range  
2,4-D H 1 8-11 1 7-9  
Glyphosate H 2 5-8 2 5-8  
Pendimethalin H 3 3-6 NA NA  
Diazinon I 4 4-6 5 2-4  
MCPP H 5 4-6 3 3-5  
Carbaryl I 6 2-4 7 2-4  
Dicamba H 7 2-4 4 3-5  
Malathion I 8 2-4 9 1-3  
DCPA H 9 1-3 10 1-3  
Benefin H 10 1-3 8 1-3  

Note: Does not include moth controls: Paradiclorobenzene (30 - 35 million pounds per year) and naphthaline (2 - 4 million pounds per year). Also does not include insect repellent N,N-diethyl-meta-toluamide (5 - 7 millions pounds per year).
H indicates herbicide and I, insecticide. NA indicates that an estimate is not available.
Source: EPA proprietary data.

Table 3.8
Most Commonly Used Conventional
Pesticide Active Ingredients
Industry/Commercial/Government Market Sector, 2001 and 1999 Estimates
(Ranked by Range in Millions of Pounds of Active Ingredient)

Active Ingredient Type
2001
1999
 
Rank Range Rank Range  
2,4-D H 1 16-18 1 17-20  
Glyphosate H 2 13-15 2 11-14  
Copper Sulfate F 3 4-6 3 5-7  
Pendimethalin H 4 3-5 4 3-5  
Chlorothalanil F 5 2-4 7 2-4  
Chlorpyrifos I 6 2-4 5 3-5  
Diuron H 7 2-4 8 2-4  
MSMA H 8 2-4 6 2-4  
Triclopyr H 9 1-3 10 1-3  
Malathion I 10 1-3 9 1-3  

Note: Includes applications to homes and gardens by professional applicators. Does not include sulfur or petroleum oil. H indicates herbicide; I, insecticide; and F, fungicide.
Source: EPA proprietary data.

3.8  Amount of Organophosphate Insecticides Used in the U.S.

Table 3.9 shows the total amount of organophosphate insecticide used in 1980, 1985, and annually since 1990. The top ten active ingredients in this pesticide class include malathion, chlorpyrifos, terbufos, diazinon, methyl-parathion, phorate, acephate, phosmet, azinphos-methyl, and dimethoate (see Table 3.10). Since the passage of the Food Quality Protection Act (FQPA) in 1996, this class of conventional pesticides has been a primary focus of EPA reregistration activities. For more information on the active ingredients included in this pesticide class and their reregistration and registration status, go to the U.S. EPA¬'s Office of Pesticide Programs Website.

The amount of organophosphate insecticides used has declined nearly 45% since 1980, from an estimated 131 million pounds in 1980 to 73 million pounds in 2001 (see Figure 3.4). Since 1980, however, organophosphate use as a percent of total insecticide use has increased, from 58% in 1980 to 70% in 2001. The increase in use in 1999 was due mainly to the increased amount of malathion used as part of the USDA-sponsored Boll Weevil Eradication Program exit EPA disclaimer. Malathion use in this program decreased over the last two years, resulting in a decline in total organophosphate use. The estimates of organophosphate insecticide use rely on the estimated amount used and changes in the amount used of organophosphates from public and proprietary EPA databases.

Table 3.9
Amount of Organophosphate Insecticide
Active Ingredients Used in the U.S.
All Market Sectors, 1980 - 2001

Year All Insecticides
Organophosphates
  Mil lbs of a.i. Mil lbs of a.i. % of All Insecticides
1980
228
131
58%
1985
161
114
71%
1990
121
85
70%
1991
114
82
72%
1992
116
84
72%
1993
115
79
69%
1994
124
83
67%
1995
125
80
64%
1996
116
75
65%
1997
112
73
65%
1998
103
66
64%
1999
126
91
72%
2000
122
88
72%
2001
105
73
70%

Note: The abbreviation "a.i." stands for active ingredient.
Source: EPA estimates based on Croplife America annual surveys, USDA/NASS exit EPA disclaimer, and EPA proprietary data.

Figure 3.4
Total Amount of Organophosphate and
All Other Insecticides Active Ingredients Used in the U.S.
All Market Sectors, 1980 - 2001

Stacked Area Chart: Millions of Pounds by Year. (This chart depicts the data as presented in Table 3.9)

Table 3.10
Most Commonly Used Organophosphate Insecticide
Active Ingredients
All Market Sectors, 2001 and 1999 Estimates
(Ranked by Range in Millions of Pounds of Active Ingredient)

Active Ingredient
2001
1999
 
Rank Range Rank Range  
Malathion 1 23-32 1 30-38  
Chlorpyrifos 2 11-16 2 13-19  
Diazinon 3 4-7 4 4-7  
Terbufos 4 3-5 3 5-7  
Acephate 5 2-3 7 2-3  
Phorate 6 2-3 6 2-3  
Methyl Parathion 7 1-3 5 2-4  
Phosmet 8 1-2 9 1-2  
Azinphos-Methyl 9 1-2 8 1-2  
Dimethoate 10 1-2 10 1-2  

Source: EPA estimates based on Croplife America annual surveys, USDA/NASS exit EPA disclaimer, and EPA proprietary data.
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