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Frequently Asked Questions about the UIC Program

General Questions About the UIC Program

Q: What does "UIC" mean and what's the purpose of the UIC program?
A: "UIC" stands for "Underground Injection Control." This is a program authorized by the Safe Drinking Water Act to protect ground water. By regulating the disposal of waste fluids through underground injection wells (including shallow disposal systems like drywells and certain septic systems), underground sources of drinking water (USDWs) are protected.

Q: Where does the UIC program get its authority?
A: The UIC program is authorized by the Part C of the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA), PL 93-523 and Amendments. The UIC program also implements the portions of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), PL 94-580 and Amendments, dealing with the underground disposal of hazardous wastes. The regulations implementing these laws are published in Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations, mostly in Parts 144-146 and 148.

Q: What's a USDW?
A: USDWs are defined broadly to include all fresh water aquifers unless they have been specifically exempted from protection. A USDW may be in current use as a source of drinking water, but that is not always the case. A USDW is simply any aquifer which is currently being used as a drinking water source or which is of sufficient volume and adequate quality to be a source for a public water system (25 or more connections.)

Q: What's an injection well?
A: Injection wells are defined broadly to include: boreholes, sumps, drywells, cesspools, septic systems, and storm water drains, drainfields, and other subsurface drainage and disposal devices used to put fluids into the ground. These range from deep, highly technical wells to shallow on-site septic systems. There are five categories or "classes" of injection wells based on function, construction, and operating features.

Q: Is underground injection really necessary? Can't it simply be banned?
A: If properly situated, constructed, and operated, injection wells are by far the best way to dispose of some waste fluids. Also, not all injection wells are used for waste fluid disposal. Other common uses of injection wells include aquifer recharge, ground water clean-up, petroleum and natural gas storage, mineral production, and enhanced recovery of petroleum. The injection of untreated hazardous waste above or into USDWs has been banned since 1985. Large capacity cesspools and most motor vehicle waste disposal wells have been banned starting in 2000.

Top of General UIC Questions

Q: How are all the different types of injection wells regulated?
A: All injection well owners/operators are required to operate and (eventually) close their injection wells in a manner which will prevent contamination of a USDW. This means that injection can not cause ground water to exceed a primary drinking water standard or other accepted human health-based limits. This standard is the same for all types of injection wells. Compliance with this "non-endangerment" standard is ensured by EPA or a delegated state agency through the issuance of permits for some types of injection wells. However, most injection wells are authorized by rule.

Q: What does "authorized by rule" mean?
A: "Authorized by Rule" means that an injection well may be operated without a permit as long as two primary conditions are met. First, the injection well must be inventoried, meaning that a form must be submitted to the UIC program, which provides the UIC program with certain information about the injection well, such as the name and address of the owner/operator, physical location of the injection well, construction of the injection well, and type of fluid disposed. Second, the injection well must be constructed, installed, operated, maintained, and finally closed in a manner that protects ground water quality. If these two primary criteria can be met by the owner/operator of an injection well, an UIC permit may not be required for certain kinds of injection wells.

Q: Which kinds of injection wells are authorized by rule and which ones require a permit?
A: The UIC regulations define five different classes of injection wells. All Class I and Class III wells need a permit to operate. All new and most existing Class II wells require permits but some existing Class II wells are rule-authorized. Most kinds of Class V wells are authorized by rule. Class IV wells are banned

Q: What are Class I wells?
A: Class I wells discharge below the deepest underground source of drinking water (USDW.) They are subdivided into industrial and municipal based on their ownership and into hazardous and non-hazardous based on the nature of the injected waste.

Q: What are Class II wells?
A: Class II wells inject fluids directly associated with oil and natural gas production wells. Generally, when oil or gas is produced from underground, a lot of water comes up with it. This "formation water" is normally saline and contaminated by the petroleum. These fluids can be disposed of in a Class II injection well along with certain non-hazardous waste fluids from any on-site gas plant. Wells injecting certain petroleum products underground for storage are also considered Class II wells. Class II wells also include enhanced recovery wells. These wells, often called "waterflood" wells, are used to inject water or other fluids back into the producing formation to force out more oil and gas.

Q: What are Class III wells?
A: Class III wells inject fluids underground to bring minerals to the surface by dissolving them or leaching them out of the rock in which they occur. These wells are used for sulfur mining, uranium and other metals mining, and solution mining of salts or potash.

Top of General UIC Questions

Q: What are Class IV wells?
A: Class IV wells inject hazardous and radioactive waste fluids (as defined by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, RCRA) into or above a USDW. Class IV wells have been banned nationwide since 1985 except for those wells that are injecting treated groundwater into the same formation that it was drawn from as part of an approved cleanup.

Q: What are Class V wells?
A: Any injection wells which do not fit into Classes I through IV are, by default, Class V injection wells. As documented in EPA's 1987 Report to Congress, there are dozens of different types of Class V injection wells. These wells are often relatively shallow and simply constructed devices (such as septic systems and drywells). The potential for Class V injection wells to pollute ground water varies widely, depending on factors such as the amount and quality of the injected fluid, the construction of the system, kinds of soil and other underground materials, depth to ground water, etc. Some types of Class V wells are generally banned (large capacity cesspools and motor vehicle waste disposal wells), while most others are authorized by rule or permit.

Q: What are the most common types of Class V injection wells in Region 5?
A: Sanitary wastewater disposal wells (multi-family and large commercial septic systems) and stormwater runoff and other drainage wells are by far the most common. Less common but still significant numbers of Class V wells are used to dispose of commercial or industrial wastewater, motor vehicle service related fluids (banned), and in some areas, agricultural drainage.

Q: How big a threat to ground water quality do those sorts of shallow injection wells really pose?
A: The degree of risk to underlying ground water varies from quite high to very low, depending upon factors such as the geologic setting, well construction and operation, volume and quality of waste fluids, likelihood of accidental spills, etc. For example, state and local governments permit the installation of approved large septic systems that adequately treat and dispose of sanitary waste fluids underground. But a floor drain or shop sink in a business that would periodically drain commercial or industrial fluids underground through a septic system could routinely violate the non-endangerment standard and lead to ground water contamination. An accidental spill into a drain could also cause contamination. Business owners and operators need to consider their liability in these kinds of situations and ensure that their underground discharges do not cause ground water contamination.

Q: Why does EPA regulate injection wells instead of my state or local government?
A: Many state and local agencies do regulate different types of injection wells under their own authorities. To run the federal UIC program, state primacy agencies must have regulations at least as stringent as the federal ones, and they may be more restrictive. Some states have chosen not to officially run the UIC program and therefore the federal EPA runs the UIC program in those states.

Q: Which States in Region 5 have UIC program primacy, and which ones depend upon EPA to implement the UIC program?
A: Illinois, Ohio, and Wisconsin have obtained full UIC program primacy. Indiana has UIC program primacy for the regulation of Class II injection wells. EPA has direct UIC program implementation responsibility for all classes of injection wells in Michigan, Minnesota, on Indian Lands, and for all but Class II injection wells in Indiana.

Top of General UIC Questions
Questions About EPA Letters to Motor Vehicle Waste Disposal Well (MVWDW) Facility Owners

Questions About Shallow Disposal Systems (Class V Injection Wells)

Q: What's an injection well?
A: Injection wells are defined broadly to include: boreholes, sumps, drywells, cesspools, septic systems, and storm water drains, drainfields, and other subsurface drainage and disposal devices used to put fluids into the ground. These range from deep, highly technical wells to shallow on-site septic systems. There are five categories or "classes" of injection wells based on function, construction, and operating features.

Q: What are Class V wells?
A: Any injection wells which do not fit into Classes I through IV are, by default, Class V injection wells. As explained in EPA's 1987 Report to Congress, there are dozens of different types of Class V injection wells. These wells are usually shallow and simply constructed devices (such as septic systems and drywells). The potential for Class V injection wells to pollute ground water varies widely, depending on things like the amount and kinds of fluid going into the well, the construction of the system, kinds of soil and other underground materials, depth to ground water, etc. Some types of Class V wells are generally banned ( large capacity cesspools and motor vehicle waste disposal wells), while most others are authorized by rule or permit.

Q: What are the most common types of Class V injection wells in Region 5?
A: Sanitary wastewater disposal wells (multi-family and large commercial septic systems) and stormwater runoff and other drainage wells are by far the most common. Less common but still significant numbers of Class V wells are used to dispose of commercial or industrial wastewater, motor vehicle service related fluids, and in some areas, agricultural drainage. List of Subtypes of Class V Wells

Q: How big a threat to ground water quality do those sorts of shallow injection wells really pose?
A: The degree of risk to ground water varies from quite high to very low, depending upon things like the geologic setting, well construction and operation, volume and quality of waste fluids, likelihood of accidental spills, etc. For example, state and local governments permit the installation of approved large septic systems that adequately treat and dispose of sanitary waste fluids underground. However, a floor drain or shop sink in a business that would periodically drain small amounts of commercial or industrial fluids through a septic system could slowly spread contaminants underground and lead to ground water pollution. An accidental, one-time spill into a drain could also cause contamination. Business owners and operators need to consider their liability in these kinds of situations and ensure that their underground discharges do not cause ground water contamination which could be costly to clean-up.

Top of Class V Questions

Q: Why does EPA regulate injection wells instead of my state or local government?
A: Many state and local agencies do regulate different types of injection wells under their own authorities. To run the federal UIC program, state primacy agencies must have regulations at least as stringent as the federal ones, and they may be more restrictive. Some states have chosen not to officially run the UIC program and therefore the federal EPA runs the UIC program in those states.

Q: Which States in Region 5 have UIC program primacy for Class V wells, and which ones depend upon EPA to implement the Class V program?
A: Currently, Illinois, Ohio, and Wisconsin have obtained full UIC Class V well program primacy. EPA has the responsibility to directly implement the UIC Class V well program in Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, and on Indian Lands.

Q: How do I know if I have a Class V well?
A: If you have any wastewater or other fluids that eventually discharge underground through a pipe, septic system, catchbasin, drywell, or other related mechanism, you probably have a Class V well. If all of your drainage and wastewater goes into a city sewer system, you probably don't have a Class V well.

Not all septic systems are Class V wells. The Large-Capacity Septic System web page can help you determine if your septic system is a Class V well.

Q: What if I'm still not sure if I have a Class well?
A: We request that people that could have a possible Class V well fill out an UNDERGROUND DISCHARGE SYSTEM (CLASS V) INVENTORY SHEET and send it in to EPA for review. In most situations, we can determine if you have a Class V well based on our review of the information on the inventory form.

Q: What do I have to do if I have a Class V well? Do I need to get a permit?
A: The owner or operator of a Class V well is required at a minimum to do at least two things, 1) provide EPA with some basic inventory information about their well, and 2) do not endanger any underground source of drinking water.

To provide the required inventory information, the owner or operator can send EPA a completed UNDERGROUND DISCHARGE SYSTEM (CLASS V) INVENTORY SHEET. The instructions for completing the form include the address to mail the form back to EPA. For most situations, this is all you will have to do (if the information provided is complete). In rare situations, if we need additional information, or if you would need to do anything else (like submit a permit application or close your Class V well), we will get back to you. As mentioned above, you are still not allowed to contaminate an underground source of drinking water, so take measures to prevent any discharges of fluids that could cause contamination.

Top of Class V Questions

Q: What do I have to do if I have a remediation project?
A: Remediation projects that utilize injection wells as part of the site cleanup activity are also regulated by the UIC program. At a minimum, all injection well owners/operators need to provide inventory information about the wells to the UIC program. This can be provided on our example inventory sheet. In addition to the information requested in the inventory sheet, please attach a brief description of the contamination being addressed and include a map of the areal extent of the contamination. This can be from previously prepared reports for other programs or agencies that are overseeing the cleanup activities.

Because these cleanups are intended to benefit the environment and are already overseen by other federal and/or state programs, the UIC program does not wish to unnecessarily delay remediation activities. In most all situations, the above information is sufficient to allow the UIC program to "rule-authorize" these types of injection wells (they do not require a permit). If you would like to receive a letter or e-mail response back from EPA that the wells are authorized by rule, please include a cover letter with your inventory submittal requesting a response. After the injection activity has been completed, you need to notify the UIC program briefly describing when the wells have been plugged and how they were plugged.

Q: Why was I sent a Class V inventory sheet/form?
A: The EPA Region 5 UIC Program is conducting an inventory of all buildings and facilities including businesses and government facilities that might dispose of fluid wastes into the ground through Class V wells. We are using several sources of publicly available information to create mailing lists of facilities in unsewered areas (which are most likely to have Class V wells). In some cases, our field inspectors have visited the facility and no inventory information was provided by the owner/operator. This request for information is part of an effort to assist Class V well owner/operators to comply with their responsibility to submit inventory information to EPA. This is also a ground water protection effort since many areas of Region 5 have ground water that is close to the surface and is vulnerable to contamination from disposing of certain fluids through septic systems, drywells, french drains, or similar disposal systems. EPA believes that by notifying Class V well owners and operators of the requirement to submit Class V well inventory information, the owners and operators of these systems will be more likely to follow best management practices at their facilities which will lead to better protection of underground sources of drinking from contamination.

Q: Who receives Inventory Forms? Am I the only one?
A: All buildings and facilities, including businesses and government facilities that potentially dispose of fluid wastes into the ground in the states of Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, and on Indian lands in Region 5, are asked to fill out an inventory form. The UIC programs in Illinois, Ohio and Wisconsin are run by their respective state programs, which also conduct inventory surveys to identify Class V wells. Since providing the inventory information to the UIC Director is required for all Class V wells, and most business and facility owners and operators are not aware of this requirement, EPA has chosen to assist the regulated entities by informing them of the requirement and providing them with a form to fill-out and return.

Q: Why do I need to fill it out?
A: All owners or operators of Class V wells (or shallow waste disposal systems) are required to provide basic "inventory information" to the UIC Director according to Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations (40 CFR) Sections

144.26 and 144.83. The EPA Region 5 office has provided the inventory form, UNDERGROUND DISCHARGE SYSTEM (CLASS V) INVENTORY SHEET, to assist you with this requirement. If the form is properly filled-out and returned to the address listed at the bottom of the instructions, this inventory requirement has been met.

Q: This form does not apply to me, since I don't have any underground discharges at my business. Do I still have to fill it out and mail it back?
A: If you are sure that this form is not applicable to you (for example, all your wastewater discharges to a municipal sewer system or onto the surface of the ground), you are not required to respond. We would appreciate your returning the form, stating the reason that this does not apply to you, so that we can remove your business from our list. But, if you are not sure where the wastewater at your facility goes, you should still fill it out to the best of your knowledge and send it to the address listed at the bottom of the instructions.

Top of Class V Questions

Q: What if I only lease this facility/space?
A: The operator of the business is still responsible for submitting the inventory information for the facility. If you are uncertain about any of the required information, contact the owner of the facility.

Q: What if the form was mailed to my place of residence instead of my business?
A: If your business is conducted at another location other than your residence, provide the information for that alternate site.

Q: What if I work out of my home?
A: If you work out of your home, are not on a municipal sewer, and you generate waste fluids from your business that discharge underground such as through floor drains or a septic system, you are likely operating a Class V well or a shallow waste disposal system. You should fill out the form and send it to EPA.

Q: What if I have more than one facility?
A: If you have more than one location, copy the form and fill out the required information for each individual facility and return all forms to the EPA.

Q: What if the sanitary waste (bathroom) goes to the public sewer system, but the floor drains in the garage or maintenance/shop area not connected to the sewer? A: You must provide inventory information for the wastewater discharges from the garage or maintenance/shop area. Fill out the required information for the facility and return the form to the EPA.

Q: I have a floor drain, but I never use it.
A: lf you have a floor drain that is connected to a drywell, septic system or any other kind of drainage system that could discharge underground, it still is a Class V well. Just because the system currently doesn't receive fluids does not exempt you from having to provide inventory information.

Q: What if all the floor drains go into a holding tank?
A: If you have no other underground discharges at your facility, and all the waste goes to a holding tank with no underground outlet that is periodically pumped out by a licensed waste hauler, you do not have a Class V well. A septic tank, a grease separator, or a oil separator is not a holding tank. A holding tank must not have a overflow or other holes or pipes that could discharge underground.

Top of Class V Questions

Q: Who do I send the form to?
A: Lisa Perenchio (WU-16J), EPA Region 5, 77 West Jackson Boulevard, Chicago, Illinois 60604-3590.

Q: I was told that I need to close my Class V well or get a permit. What does each mean?
A: The regulations require that certain Class V wells must either be closed or operate by a permit if they remain open. This is necessary so that fluids that could enter the ground through the disposal system not contaminate underground sources of drinking water.

The simplest choice is to close the Class V well, since it permanently stops possible contaminants from entering the ground, even from accidental leaks or spills. How you close your Class V well is up to you so long as its approved by EPA, and details will depend on your facility construction and operation. Closure could be as simple as permanently plugging a floor drain. It could even involve connecting to a holding tank or a municipal sewer. EPA Region 5 has prepared guidelines on how to close Class V wells.

Getting a permit is different. It starts with proving that the waste fluids in your Class V well meet National Primary Drinking Water Standards and other health based standards, and submitting a complete Class V permit application to EPA. If the application is approved and a permit is issued, the permitee must meet all permit requirements. The permit requirements will include management practices to minimize the chance of contaminants entering the wastewater. A permit will also include a schedule for sampling and reporting the chemical composition of wastewater fluids and sludge. Whether samples are collected and analyzed monthly or quarterly will depend on site-specific conditions. If any samples do not meet drinking water standards, the well must be closed or additional treatment equipment might be required. If any permit conditions are not met, enforcement action including penalties can result.

Q: Where do I collect samples from my Class V well?
A: To get an EPA permit, the regulations require that fluids released underground by a motor vehicle waste disposal well must meet National Primary Drinking Water Standards and other health based standards at the last accessible sampling point before waste fluids are released into the underground environment. This opening would be where you collect the fluid and sludge samples for analysis. For example, for a septic system that might be at the distribution box. If the distribution box is not accessible it could be the septic tank. For a drywell it could be within the drywell itself.

Top of Class V Questions
General UIC Frequently Asked Questions

Frequently Asked Questions About EPA Letters to Motor Vehicle Waste Disposal Well (MVWDW) Facility Owners

Q: What's this letter about? A: The information we have shows that your business has a floor drain or shop sink in a motor vehicle service or maintenance area. We wanted to let you know that these kinds of drainage systems are not allowed any more, and we want to give you a chance to permanently close-off any potential for drainage underground before the January 1, 2007 deadline.

Q: Why did I get this letter? A: Every business in your state that has a floor drain or shop sink in a motor vehicle service or maintenance area should get a letter. Right now, the information we have shows that your business has an open drain system that could allow fluids in the service area to drain underground. We wanted to remind folks -- and let folks who didn't already know -- that these kind of drainage systems are not allowed any more, and that they have to be permanently closed-off by the end of the year.

Q: How do you know I have one of these things? Did someone turn me in? A: Some time ago there was an inspection of the facility or information was provided by you or the previous business owner or operator that showed a regulated drainage system existed there.

Q: I don't have one of these things. I think I got this by mistake. This doesn't apply to me. A: The information we have shows that your business has a floor drain or shop sink in a motor vehicle service or maintenance area that drains underground. You will need to provide us with information that shows that your business doesn't have this kind of system that drains underground, or that motor vehicles are not ever serviced at your facility. If your drain system has already been closed, please let us know when it happened and how it was permanently closed.

Q: Why do I have to do this? A: Because the federal regulations require that any of these systems must be closed (or permanently converted to some other use). The regulations for the closure of these underground drainage systems are necessary to help prevent the contamination of underground sources of drinking water. It's also a way for you to reduce future liability.

Q: Why can't I get a permit? A: According to the federal regulations, if you don't have a federal Underground Injection Control Class V well permit by January 1, 2007, you must close-off your underground drainage system by the deadline. Since no one has submitted a complete EPA permit application for a Class V well permit, we will not be able to issue a permit for this kind of disposal system.

Top of MVWDW Questions

Q: Where does this apply? What States is EPA doing this in? A: This is a nation wide requirement. This EPA office is sending letters to businesses like yours in Indiana, Michigan, and Minnesota.

Q: What gives you the right to do this to me? A: The federal 1999 regulations that ban these kinds of drainage systems were developed under the Safe Drinking Water Act, which is an Act of Congress. EPA has the authority to enforce these requirements.

Q: What do I have to do? A: You need to permanently close off any place in the service area that vehicle service related fluids could go underground. The pictures that were with the letter we sent you show some EPA approved examples of how some folks did this. First, you will need to tell us how you plan to do this by filling out the Class V Well Pre-closure Notification Form and send it in to us. If your plan is okay, we will let you know. If EPA doesn't get back to you within 30 days, you can go ahead and close off the drainage system as you proposed on the plan you sent in. Second, you need to collect some proof that this work was done. Examples of this proof could be: before & after pictures, or receipts for closure supplies (like cement) or for work done (like holding tank installation). If no proof is available we can accept your signed certification that the work was completed. Lastly, you need to let EPA know when the work was done and provide the proof.

Q: I already plugged my floor drains, what do I have to do? A: You need to send us a letter telling us when (the date) this was done and how it was done. You also need to include some proof. Examples of this proof could be: before & after pictures, receipts for closure supplies (like cement) or for work done (like holding tank installation). If no proof is available we can accept your signed certification that the work was completed.

Q: Who do I send the form to? A: To the name & address in the letter (Clifton Lee (WU-16J), EPA Region 5, 77 West Jackson Boulevard, Chicago, Illinois 60604). Please include the EPA identification number that was on your letter.

Q: How do I close a shop sink in the service area? A: In this kind of situation "closure" would mean that the sink would be used for hand washing only and no longer be able to be used for parts cleaning or draining any motor vehicle related fluids, solvents or other chemicals. This can be done in different ways. The plumbing for the whole facility (including the shop sink) could be connected to a municipal sewer system. Another method of "closure" could be to disconnect the sink drain pipe from the building plumbing and direct it to a holding tank where the waste fluids can be periodically pumped out by a licensed hauler. In some situations a shop sink can remain connected to the existing building plumbing if EPA can be assured that the sink will only be used for hand washing purposes because of the use of Best Management Practices is documented. These practices would include: 1) training for employees that no wastes will be poured down the drain and no parts cleaning is done in the sink; 2) a sign is posted above the sink to remind employees to not pour wastes into the sink; and 3) signed certification is provided that no parts washing will be done in the sink, and an alternative procedure for parts washing is explained (like all parts cleaning is done in a separate self-contained unit that is maintained and periodically replaced by a recycling service).

Top of MVWDW Questions

Q: What if the restroom and the floor drains in the garage or maintenance/shop area all go into the same septic system? A: The restroom can still drain into the septic system. You only need to permanently plug off the floor drains that go to the septic system. The floor drains can be cemented closed or connected to a separate holding tank (a holding tank must not have an overflow or other holes or pipes that could discharge underground).

Q: What if I need to keep my floor drain open for snow melt and/or vehicle wash water? A: In some cases floor drains can remain open. For example, if they are connected to a holding tank (a holding tank must not have an overflow or other holes or pipes that could discharge underground) or a municipal sanitary sewer system. Another example where a floor drain can remain open is if the area where the drain is located is physically separated from the area where any vehicle service occurs. This can only be allowed if EPA can be assured that no motor vehicle service will occur in the area with a floor drain area and that only fluids from snow melt or vehicle exterior washing can enter the drain because Best Management Practices are followed. These practices would include: 1) training for employees that no wastes will be poured down the drain and no parts cleaning or motor vehicle fluids are stored in the area; 2) a sign is posted in the area to remind employees to not pour wastes into the drain; and 3) signed certification is provided that no vehicle service work will be done in the area.

Q: I need more time to do this work. I can't get this done before the deadline. A: We realize that some business owners and operators may not have heard about this requirement until now. We would at least like to have a Class V Well Pre-closure Notification Form filled-out, signed and returned to us by January 1, 2007 (or as soon as possible) including a reasonable date for closure. Depending on the kind of work that will be done, we can be flexible in what we will allow in some cases. If work such as connection to a municipal sanitary sewer system is planned, we would need a letter from the sewer authority with an estimated date for connection. In situations where construction will need to wait until after the frozen ground has thawed, we would need to have a schedule for completion of the work. In any case where a delay in construction is allowed, no motor vehicle service related fluids can enter the existing underground drainage system.

Q: After I send in the proof of closure, am I done? How do I know that EPA won't come back and make me do more? A: If we can see from the proof that you send us that your drainage system was closed (or properly converted), we will send you a letter that we recognize that the system was closed to prevent contamination. We recommend that you keep a copy of the letter, and a copy of the proof that sent us for your files. Even though we require that you keep this for at least 3 years, you may need this information at a later date for other purposes, like if you would want to sell the property. Because you once had an underground disposal system at the facility, there is a chance that past drainage could have caused some underground contamination. EPA still has the authority to visit these facilities and require sampling to investigate possible contamination. Our inspectors will also visit facilities to verify drainage system closures or revisit some facilities from time-to-time to determine if any changes have been made to the underground drainage system.

Top of MVWDW Questions
Class V Questions
General UIC Frequently Asked Questions


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