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East Mount Zion

Community Relations Plan

Springettsbury Township, York County, Pennsylvania

Prepared for
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
Region III
1650 Arch St.
Philadelphia, PA 19103-2029

January 1997

Table of Contents

  1. Overview of the Community Relations Plan
  2. EPA Background
    1. Superfund
    2. Relevant EPA Groups
    3. State Role
  3. Site Description and History
    1. Site Description
    2. Site History
  4. Community Background
    1. Community Profile
    2. History of Community Involvement
    3. Community Concerns
  5. Objectives of the Community Relations Plan
  6. Community Relations Activities  

APPENDICES

  1. Interested Parties and Key Community Contacts
  2. Public Meeting Location and Local Stenographic Information
  3. Information Repositories
  4. Glossary of Technical Terms
  5. Technical Assistance Grant Information
  6. Sample Community Interview Questions
  7. Sample Fact Sheet and Sample Public Notice
    (Fact Sheet and Public Notice not available.)

FIGURES

  1. Site Location Map

TABLES

  1. Community Relations Activities and Timing

Section 1: Overview of the Community Relations Plan

*All words highlighted in bold italics are defined in the Glossary of Technical Terms (Appendix D).

EPA developed this Community Relations Plan to encourage community involvement and two-way communication between the site community and EPA during the site cleanup*. EPA is committed to acknowledging and addressing the site-related concerns of local community members, including residents, public officials, media, and other interested parties. Although there has not been much activity at the East Mt. Zion Site lately, many in the surrounding community are aware of the landfill and its history. The residents with homes bordering the landfill have been actively involved in the site cleanup throughout the Superfund process. With the anticipated start-up of construction, overall community involvement has increased.

EPA will use this Community Relations Plan as a guide to conduct community relations activities as part of the Superfund process at the site. This Community Relations Plan describes the site and its history; past community involvement; current community concerns; and the steps EPA will take to address these concerns. EPA's major goal is to keep community members informed about and involved in the site clean-up process. EPA prepared this Community Relations Plan from many information sources, including EPA site files, public meetings, community interviews, and input from local residents and public officials. The EPA Region III Community Involvement Coordinator will oversee the implementation of all activities outlined in this plan.

This Community Relations Plan is divided into six sections, and appendixes. Section 1 is an Overview of the Community Relations Plan. Section 2, EPA Background, provides an overview of the Superfund program; relevant EPA sections, branches, and offices; and the role of the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (PADEP). Section 3 gives a brief summary of the site and its history. Section 4, Community Background, presents a profile of the community surrounding the site, a history of community relations at the site, and a list of site-related concerns and issues raised by community members. Section 5, Objectives of the Community Relations Plan, describes the community relations goals EPA plans to achieve by involving local residents, public officials, and local news media in site activities. Section 6, Community Relations Activities, describes the activities EPA will conduct to achieve its community relations goals at the site.

Section 2: EPA Background

2.1 Superfund

Superfund is the Federal government's program to clean up uncontrolled or abandoned hazardous waste sites. Superfund is guided by the National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP). Superfund's laws, officially known as the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), were passed by Congress in 1980 and amended in 1986 by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA). Superfund gives EPA the authority to stop on-going releases or prevent potential releases of hazardous substances; enables EPA to make the parties responsible for contaminating a site pay for its cleanup; and provides funding for the cleanup when money from responsible parties is not available.

Identifying Sites for Cleanup

Under the Superfund program, EPA investigates hazardous waste sites throughout the United States. EPA conducts an initial review of each site to determine whether further action is necessary. EPA then evaluates the site by using the Hazard Ranking System. The Hazard Ranking System is a measurement tool used to assign each site a score based on the possibility that contamination will spread through ground water, surface water, or air. It also takes into account other factors, such as the location of nearby residences. EPA places the most serious sites on the National Priorities List (NPL), which is a list of sites identified for possible cleanup using Superfund money.

Selecting and Implementing the Cleanup Plan

After placing a site on the National Priorities List, EPA conducts a Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study (RI/FS). The Remedial Investigation examines the site's contamination to find out what it is, how much there is, what it is affecting, and what types of health or environmental damage it could cause. A Feasibility Study reviews the different ways the contamination can be cleaned up and evaluates the effectiveness of different clean-up options to help determine what will work best for the particular site and the surrounding community. EPA announces its recommended clean-up method in a document called a Proposed Remedial Action Plan (Proposed Plan). EPA then announces a public comment period concerning the Proposed Plan. During this time, EPA holds a public meeting to provide information and address the community's questions about the Proposed Plan. EPA takes all comments into consideration and may change its recommended clean-up method based on citizen input. After reviewing all public comments, EPA makes a final decision and selects a clean-up method. This selection is announced in a document called the Record of Decision (ROD).

The next steps are the Remedial Design and Remedial Action (RD/RA), during which EPA supervises the design and implementation of the clean-up plan outlined in the ROD. When necessary, EPA can modify the ROD to reflect minor changes to the clean-up plan. If any changes are recommended for the ROD, EPA will announce these changes in a document called an Explanation of Significant Differences (ESD). After appropriate clean-up actions have been completed at a site, EPA will delete that site from the National Priorities List. EPA continues to monitor delisted Superfund sites every five years to ensure that appropriate clean-up levels are being achieved.

2.2 Relevant EPA Groups

Headquartered in Washington, D.C., EPA has 10 regional offices, each of which have community relations and technical staff involved in Superfund site cleanups. EPA Region III encompasses Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, West Virginia, and Washington, D.C. The EPA Region III office is located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. It houses several divisions, branches, and sections that work with other EPA regional offices when necessary. The EPA branches most involved with the East Mt. Zion Site are described below.

Superfund Community Involvement Branch (Region III)

This branch oversees communication between EPA and all residents, public officials, media representatives, and community groups associated with Superfund sites. The Superfund Community Involvement Branch is responsible for the planning, coordination, and implementation of activities designed to enhance communication and community involvement for each site. Each site is assigned a Community Involvement Coordinator who works closely with EPA technical staff to keep the local community informed and involved during Superfund clean-up work. (The Community Involvement Coordinator for the East Mt. Zion Site is Bill Hudson. See Appendix A, page 4, for his address and telephone number.)

Superfund Pennsylvania Remedial Branch (Region III)

This branch is responsible for all long-term clean-up work at Superfund sites in Pennsylvania. These responsibilities include conducting site assessments, remedial investigations, feasibility studies, treatability tests, and clean-up designs and actions. Each site is assigned a Remedial Project Manager (RPM), who supervises the work performed by EPA technical staff, private contractors, and other parties involved in the site study and cleanup. (The RPM for the East Mt. Zion Site is John Banks. See Appendix A, page 4, for his address and telephone number.)

Superfund Removal Branch (Region III)

EPA's Superfund Removal Branch manages short-term actions and emergency removal responses. These actions include responses to immediate threats or accidental releases of hazardous substances, as well as short-term work at sites on EPA's National Priorities List. Immediate removal actions are supervised by EPA On-scene Coordinators (OSCs).

2.3 State Role

Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection

The Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (PADEP) is the support agency for EPA-led studies and cleanups at Federal Superfund sites in Pennsylvania. (See Appendix A for the name, address, and telephone number of the PADEP contact person for the East Mt. Zion Site.) PADEP reviews and comments on site work plans and studies, participates in community relations activities, and provides technical assistance for EPA when needed.

Section 3: Site Description and History

3.1 Site Description

The East Mt. Zion Superfund Site is an inactive 10-acre landfill located adjacent to Rocky Ridge County Park in Springettsbury Township,York County, Pennsylvania (See Figure 1). The site is situated on top of an 860-foot-high forested ridge along the south side of Deininger Road just before the entrance to the park. The landfill accepted various municipal and industrial wastes from 1955 until 1972. It operated as an area-type landfill in which areas for filling were excavated, filled with waste, and covered. The site currently contains approximately 300,000 cubic yards of waste and is covered by a thin layer of soil and vegetation. Several park trails and recreation areas border the site to the east, north, and south. Single family homes in the Doersam Woods community border the site to the west. Numerous residential developments also are dispersed among the woodlands areas, and at lower elevations to the south (Ridgewood Road), west (Mount Zion Road), and north (Deininger Road and Druck Valley Road).

3.2 Site History

The site was privately purchased in 1952 and began accepting waste in approximately 1955. From 1969 through 1971, the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (PADEP) conducted many inspections at the landfill. These inspections revealed that debris was being placed in open trenches and that proper cover was not being applied to the waste on a daily basis as required. In 1972, based on these inspections, PADEP initiated extensive legal action to close the landfill. The landfill finally was closed in 1976. As part of the final closing activities, a thin covering of soil was placed over the waste and the area was seeded.

In 1983, at PADEP's request, EPA initiated a Preliminary Assessment and Site Inspection to collect additional information on the waste at the landfill. This assessment and inspection revealed contamination in sediments and ground water at the site. As a result, EPA placed the landfill on the National Priorities List, including it in the Superfund program for long-term cleanup. Using Superfund monies and under oversight from EPA, PADEP conducted a Remedial Investigation (RI) to determine the type and amount of contamination at the site. PADEP followed the RI with a Feasibility Study (FS), which reviewed the different methods available to address the contamination at the site. The RI showed there was no immediate danger to local residents. However, the chemicals found in the ground water, vinyl chloride and benzene, are hazardous. Although no residential wells in the direct site area are contaminated, these chemicals have the potential, over time, to move into the ground water outside the site and reach other drinking water supplies.

In May 1990, EPA released a Proposed Remedial Action Plan to outline the various alternatives available to address the contamination and presented these alternatives to the community at a public meeting. After reviewing the public's input on the clean-up alternatives, EPA signed a Record of Decision on June 30, 1990, identifying its chosen clean-up method for the site. EPA's selected remedy involves constructing an impermeable cap over the landfill, installing vents in the cap, and conducting annual ground water monitoring. The cap will prevent further contaminants from seeping through the landfill into the ground water, and the vents will allow methane gas from the landfill to dissipate into the air. In addition to installing the cap, deed restrictions placed on the site will regulate future use of the property, and a chain-link fence will restrict access to the site.

In February 1992, EPA began Remedial Design activities for the selected clean-up action. As part of this process, EPA conducted additional field work, including digging test pits to determine the exact depths of refuse in the landfill and sampling soil and ground water at the site. This work, will support the development of engineering specifications for the landfill cap. In September 1992, EPA held a public meeting to update local community members on the progress of field work and design activities. The design phase took much longer than originally anticipated and EPA completed the design work for the landfill cap in September 1994.

During the design phase, EPA determined that several changes to the June 1990 Record of Decision were needed to further protect the health and safety of local residents during the construction of the cap. Therefore, in August 1996, EPA issued an Explanation of Significant Differences (ESD) document to identify and explain these changes. The changes include:

EPA believes that these actions, together with the other components listed in the June 1990 Record of Decision, will be the most protective of human health and the environment, comply with all state and Federal requirements, and will be cost effective.

In September 1996, EPA met with residents who border the site to discuss the Remedial Design and the upcoming Remedial Action at the site. In addition, EPA entered into an agreement with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to hire a contractor and oversee all clean-up work at the site. Once a contractor is selected and a work plan is approved, actual construction and clean-up activities will begin.

Figure: Site Location Map

Site location map

Section 4: Community Background

4.1 Community Profile

Springettsbury Township is a moderately sized community located approximately 15 miles southeast of Harrisburg and eight miles east of downtown York, in York County, Pennsylvania. The township is governed by a manager and a Board of Supervisors elected to oversee all township activities. Springettsbury Township has a population of approximately 22,000, supports a full-time police force, and maintains two volunteer fire departments. The community surrounding the site is mostly residential, but also includes some industrial and commercial areas. Major employers in the area include Harley Davidson Inc. and ACCO Chain and Lifting Products.

The immediate site community is located adjacent to the landfill in the Doersam Woods development. All of the homes in this community are connected to the public water supply which was installed by Springettsbury Township in 1986. Many of these residents have lived in the community for less than ten years, but are aware of the inactive landfill and EPA's involvement in the site. Most community members appear to be fairly sensitive to environmental issues in the community other than the landfill, especially those which affect Rocky Ridge County Park.

4.2 History of Community Involvement

Community involvement in the East Mt. Zion Site dates back to the 1970s when a group of local citizens first expressed concern about the landfill to local officials. After the landfill closed in 1972, interest and involvement centered around possible contamination problems from the landfill waste. Community interest again peaked in 1983 when EPA inspected the landfill and found benzene and vinyl chloride contamination in the ground water. When these findings threatened to hold up construction of the Doersam Woods housing development, residents and officials voiced their concerns and participated in several public meetings. The community's major concerns at that time related to stagnant pools of water around the landfill, debris protruding through the surface of the landfill, and contamination of the local ground water supply.

In 1986, Springettsbury Township installed a municipal water supply in the area of the site. While this installation eased much of the community concern about the ground water supply, some residences still maintain private well water for common household uses. Community involvement was minimal between 1987 and 1990, while the Remedial Investigation was conducted at the site and the Feasibility Study was prepared. In May 1990, EPA held a meeting to present the Proposed Plan for addressing the contamination at the landfill. Although attendance at this meeting was moderate, EPA received extensive comments from community members, local officials, and potentially responsible parties during the public comment period. Following the meeting, EPA prepared a Responsiveness Summary to address all the comments received during the public comment period and included this summary as part of the June 1990 Record of Decision.

In September 1992, EPA again held a public meeting to update the community on the progress of the Remedial Design and to explain the additional field work being conducted at the site. Attendance at this meeting was moderate and consisted of local residents and township officials. Community concerns at this time centered around the effectiveness of EPA's selected remedy. Many in the community expressed concern that the capping remedy would not adequately address the contamination at the site. EPA agreed to consider these concerns during the design phase and meet with local community members before actual construction begins.

EPA interviewed local residents and officials about the East Mt. Zion Site in June 1996. All of those interviewed were asked various questions about their knowledge of the site and its cleanup, environmental sensitivity in the community, and concerns regarding the site (see Appendix F for a list of sample community interview questions). Many community members voiced their concerns about the work to clean up the contamination in the landfill. Most of those interviewed, however, stated that a lack of interest regarding the landfill had developed because of minimal information provided by those involved with the site, the length of time required to study the site, and the perception by many of the slow progress of actual clean-up work. Many community members believe that a lack of communication from the local government, EPA, and PADEP have contributed to the lack of knowledge and interest in the site, its contamination, and its cleanup. The major comments and concerns received by EPA during the June 1996 community interviews in York, Pennsylvania, are summarized in Section 4.3, Community Concerns.

4.3 Community Concerns

Site Cleanup

Because there are several homes located near the site, many were concerned about the effects of the cleanup on local residents. Several community members stated that when construction begins, it will greatly impact the local community. Residents were concerned about odor from the site, dangers to park wildlife, increased traffic, the effect on the image of Rocky Ridge County Park, and the impact of the work on property values in the area. In addition, one resident was concerned that disturbing the waste during construction may cause contamination to migrate from the site. One resident suggested that although the landfill currently may not appear to be a vital community concern, once work begins most community members in the area will become more involved.

Implementing the Remedy

Many community members are concerned about implementing the remedy selected for the landfill. Although most community members agreed that capping is the most viable option, many are unaware about the materials that will be used to construct the cap and how the cap will effectively address contamination at the site. Many suggested that a lack of information regarding the cap has contributed to these concerns. Residents also were concerned about the venting of methane gas from the landfill and implementing proper safety measures such as air monitoring when construction begins. Many believe that the construction involved with implementing the remedy will create more community concern than the remedy itself. Several community members indicated that they were aware of EPA's work at the landfill but are not familiar with the steps in the Superfund process and how the landfill will be handled once the cap is constructed.

Future Impact of Site Contamination

Current community concern about health effects from the site is minimal. Some community members, however, are concerned about the effectiveness of the capping remedy and the possible future impact of site contamination. Although residents living nearest to the site are connected to the public water supply, some community members in the area maintain private wells and are concerned about the potential movement of contaminants to the ground water and nearby waterways. One resident indicated that she has noticed some discoloration and odor in her well water. Residents questioned whether or not ground water sampling of off-site wells will be conducted during and after construction work at the site.

Communication Between EPA and the Local Community

Many local community members noted that although the majority of the community is familiar with the landfill, many are not aware of the contamination or the actions that will be taken at the site. Some residents indicated that many in the community have the "out of sight, out of mind" attitude because township officials, EPA, and PADEP have not provided updates on the landfill. One resident concluded that, although some in the community are involved in other civic activities or local government, there has never been a real concern about the landfill because it has been inactive for so long. One community member believes that many people in the community are more interested in other environmental issues that are impacting their community.

Many residents believe that increased communication with the community will increase the interest of the local community in the cleanup of the landfill. Most of those interviewed stated that they see EPA as a credible agency. Most believe, however, that more contact with the local community will improve the relationship between EPA and local residents. Some individuals suggested that EPA work directly with the residents who border the site since their properties will be impacted directly during the cleanup. Community members also suggested that EPA distribute site updates more often to highlight the schedule of site activities, the projected impacts of site work on the community, and the locations where additional information can be found.

Non-site Environmental Concerns

Most of the community members interviewed stated that other, non-site related environmental concerns exist in the community. These concerns center mainly around an incinerator located in the county. Other non-site related environmental issues include sewer system problems and future development of land in the community.

Many community members indicated that there are very few community organizations that get involved with environmental issues. Several residents, however, provided the names of key community leaders who are known for their interest in environmental issues. Although most of those interviewed believe that local community members are very sensitive to environmental issues, they also noted that there appears to be less visible concern or community participation if those environmental issues do not have a direct impact on the community.

Section 5: Objectives of the Community Relations Plan

EPA's Community Relations Plan for the East Mt. Zion Site is guided by four main objectives. These objectives, listed below, involve the cooperative efforts of the EPA Community Involvement Coordinator and Remedial Project Manager for the site, as well as other EPA staff.

  1. Provide community members with useful information about the Superfund program, the site, and the clean-up process.

    EPA will use fact sheets, newsletters, public notices, public meetings, news releases, and other means to explain the Superfund process and describe how upcoming Remedial Design and Remedial Action activities fit into the general Superfund process. EPA will explain site activities in general terms so that community members understand the clean-up process.

  2. Provide timely, site-specific updates to the local community.

    EPA will update regularly Springettsbury Township residents, local officials, community groups, and other interested parties and stakeholders on the progress of the site cleanup. EPA will make phone calls, hold public meetings, and distribute written material as needed to keep community members updated on site activities.

  3. Enlist and encourage the participation of Springettsbury Township community members in Superfund activities and provide opportunities for community input.

    EPA will encourage the site community to take an active role in the Superfund process through community outreach activities. Such activities may include public information sessions, site tours, and community interviews. EPA also will address site-related comments and questions voiced by community members.

  4. Enhance communication between EPA, local officials, community leaders, and the media.

    EPA will provide Springettsbury Township and York County officials with information about site activities and will invite and address questions from them. EPA also will distribute and thoroughly explain site-information to local media outlets and community leaders so that they can convey accurate information on the site cleanup to local community members.

Section 6: Community Relations Activities

Described below are 15 community relations activities for the East Mt. Zion Superfund Site designed to achieve the objectives summarized in Section 5. Please note that the sequential numbers which accompany the 15 community relations activities are for reference only, and do not necessarily indicate their relative importance. The anticipated time frame for these activities is shown in the Table 1.

Notify the Springettsbury Township community of upcoming site activities on a regular basis.

Objective
To minimize any concerns or disruptions to the community or their normal schedule. Regular updates on site activities will enhance public participation in the site cleanup and enable the community to provide informed input to EPA.
Method
EPA will provide printed material, make telephone calls, and hold availability sessions to focus on current and upcoming site work. EPA also will use these methods to announce the release of important site documents, to discuss other milestones, and to publicize the time, place, and purpose of public meetings.

Notify local media of upcoming site activities on a regular basis.

Objective
To ensure the distribution of accurate and consistent information about site activities. EPA will issue press releases, contact media representatives, and hold news briefings as needed to provide the media with timely and accurate information.
Method
EPA will issue news releases, make telephone calls, and hold briefings to detail current and upcoming site activities; announce the release of key documents and other milestones; and publicize the time, place, and purpose of public meetings.

Designate an EPA Community Involvement Coordinator to handle site inquiries.

Objective
To ensure prompt, accurate, and consistent responses and information about the site.
Method
Bill Hudson is the EPA Community Involvement Coordinator assigned to the site. He will work closely with John Banks, EPA's Remedial Project Manager for the site. (See Appendix A for their addresses and phone numbers.)

Respond promptly and accurately to inquiries from local residents, public officials, community groups, and the media.

Objective
To maintain two-way communication between EPA and the site community. Prompt, accurate responses will strengthen community involvement and enhance cooperation between EPA and other stakeholders in the site. Prompt responses to inquiries from local residents, media, and local officials will increase public awareness and understanding of site activities.
Method
Personal responses, meetings, and printed material will provide the basis for prompt responses from EPA to inquiries from the community. EPA's Community Involvement Coordinator will direct all inquiries to the proper contacts and ensure that a response is returned to the community in a timely manner.

Prepare and distribute site fact sheets and technical summaries.

Objective
To provide an easy-to-read update on site activities. Site fact sheets generally summarize technical work at the site and are mailed to residents, community groups, local and state officials, and other interested parties.
Method
EPA will mail fact sheets to all parties on the site mailing list and also will place copies in various locations in the site community. Fact sheets may include information about past, current, and upcoming site activities; question and answer sections focusing on community concerns; overviews of clean-up technologies; site maps; listings of EPA and and other relevant contact persons; and mailing return forms so that residents can submit questions or comments and add their names to the EPA site mailing list. Copies of fact sheets also will be available at the local EPA information repository for the site.

Maintain contact with the immediate site community and Springettsbury Township.

Objective
To maintain good communication between the site community, EPA, and Springettsbury Township, and to help keep other local residents informed of site activities. (See Appendix A for the names, addresses, and telephone numbers of key community and Springettsbury Township contact persons.)
Method
EPA will make personal contact or will provide written materials to inform the immediate site community and officials from Springettsbury Township of site developments and upcoming community involvement activities.

Maintain and update the local information repository.

Objective
To provide a reference point where the public can review the latest information on the work being conducted at the site. EPA will update this collection of site-specific documents on the East Mt. Zion Site and the Superfund process so that citizens can follow the progress of the site cleanup and provide input to EPA.
Method
As EPA releases site documents, EPA will place the documents at the local information repository and the repository maintained at EPA's Region III office. These repositories serve as a reference collection of site information. The information repository contains the Administrative Record file, which includes the Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study reports, the Proposed Remedial Action Plan, and other documents used by EPA to select the clean-up method. The repository also includes the Community Relations Plan, information about the Technical Assistance Grant program, and other information about the site and the general Superfund process. EPA has established one local information repository. (See Appendix C for the repository's address, telephone number, and business hours.)

Provide Technical Assistance Grant information.

Objective
To allow the site community a chance to review the work being conducted at the site. EPA will provide information about the Technical Assistance Grant program and review grant applications from qualified groups.
Method
EPA will make the application for a Technical Assistance Grant available to any community member who requests it. (See Appendix E for information on how to obtain an application and reference material for Technical Assistance Grants.)

Publish public notices.

Objective
To inform the community of key site developments, public meetings, and the release of site documents.
Method
Notices will appear in the local news section of a daily local newspaper and may be published in other community publications as well. Notices include relevant dates, times, and locations of meetings or activities, as well as the name, address, and phone number of the primary EPA contact person. Public notices regarding site-specific documents, such as the Explanation of Significant Differences, will summarize the document briefly. EPA published public notices in the York Dispatch and the York Daily Record to announce the release of the Proposed Plan and the Record of Decision for the East Mt. Zion Site. EPA will continue to publish public notices in both local newspapers and other publications as needed and as site activities warrant.

Conduct public meetings or availability (information) sessions.

Objective
To update the community on site developments and address any community questions, comments, and concerns.
Method
Public meetings will be held in the evening at a central location in the site community so that all interested parties will be able to attend. Availability sessions usually are held all day and can be attended at any time. The EPA Community Involvement Coordinator, the EPA Remedial Project Manager, and other EPA staff will be present at these events. EPA last held a public meeting on September 22, 1992, in the Springettsbury Township Building, to discuss future work planned for the site. EPA will hold additional meetings as needed.

Obtain a transcript of any public meeting held during a public comment period.

Objective
To document and provide a public record of the information presented at the public meeting. This transcript documents all of the information presented at the public meeting, including community members' questions and EPA's responses to them.
Method
EPA will arrange for a local stenographer to transcribe a word-for-word record of public meetings. EPA's transcript of the May 30, 1990, public meeting on the Proposed Plan for the East Mt. Zion Site is available in the information repository.

Conduct informal meetings and workshops.

Objective
To enable EPA to explain the Superfund process, describe site work, share information on site-related issues, and request input from the community.
Method
EPA will conduct informal meetings and workshops on an as-needed basis and as requested by the community. They will take place at a convenient location within the community and will involve the participation of the EPA Community Involvement Coordinator, the EPA Remedial Project Manager, and other EPA staff as needed.

Maintain and update site mailing lists.

Objective
To use in distributing site fact sheets, providing telephone updates, and conducting other community involvement activities.
Method
EPA maintains an up-to-date listing of Federal, state, and local officials; local media; community groups; and other interested parties. EPA also maintains a separate and private list of residents, obtained from local tax records, public meeting sign-in sheets, and community interviews. To protect the privacy of residents, EPA will not release the list to the press or general public. (See Appendix A for the names, addresses, and telephone numbers of Federal, state, and local officials; local media; community groups; and other interested parties.) If you would like to be added to the site's mailing list, please contact Bill Hudson (see Appendix A).

Revise the Community Relations Plan.

Objective
To identify and address community needs, issues, or concerns regarding the site or the clean-up remedy that are not addressed in this Community Relations Plan.
Method
EPA will revise the Community Relations Plan as community concern warrants, every two years, or at the time a new Record of Decision is issued at the site. The Revised Community Relations Plan will update the information presented in the previous version of the Community Relations Plan.

Provide communication avenues for the community.

Objective
To utilize various communication resources to encourage community involvement in EPA's Superfund activities.
Method
EPA has established a Superfund toll-free hot line and electronic mail (e-mail) access to allow community members to contact EPA officials and obtain site-specific public documents and other Superfund information. (See Appendix A for EPA's toll-free number and e-mail addresses for the East Mt. Zion Site).

Table 1: Community Relations Activities and Timing

Activity Timing
1. Notify residents of upcoming site activities. As site activity warrants.
2. Notify local media of upcoming site activities. As site activity warrants.
3. Designate an EPA primary contact person. Person has been designated.
4. Respond promptly and accurately to inquiries. As needed.
5. Write and distribute site fact sheets. As site work progresses.
6. Maintain contact with the immediate site community and township officials. As site activity warrants.
7. Maintain and update each local information repository. As new site documents are released.
8. Provide Technical Assistance Grant information. As requested.
9. Publish public notices At milestones, such as the Proposed Plan, Record of Decision, and for other reasons as needed.
10. Conduct public meetings and availability sessions. Before beginning construction on the remedy and as needed.
11. Obtain a transcript of public meetings during a public comment period. As needed; Proposed Plan transcript was placed in the information repository.
12. Conduct informal meetings and workshops. As needed and based on community interest.
13. Maintain and update site mailing lists. Lists have been established; update as needed.
14. Revise the Community Relations Plan. As needed.
15. Provide communication avenues for the community. Toll-free hotline and e-mail access are established.

APPENDIX A: Interested Parties and Key Community Contacts

A. Federal Elected Officials

Senator Arlen Specter

Senator Rick Santorum

Representative William F. Goodling

B. State Elected Officials

Representative Al Masland

Representative Stephen H. Stetler

Representative Steven R. Nickol

Representative Todd Platts

Representative Stan Saylor

Representative Bruce Smith

Senator Gibson Armstrong

Senator Harold F. Mowery

Senator Terry Punt

C. Local Officials

Paul Amic, Manager
Springettsbury Township
1501 Mt. Zion Road
York, PA 17402
717-757-3521

Lori Mitrick, Chairperson
Springettsbury Township Board of Supervisors
1501 Mt. Zion Road
York, PA 17402
717-757-3521

Ken Tasch, Vice Chairman
Springettsbury Township Board of Supervisors
1501 Mt. Zion Road
York, PA 17402
717-757-3521

Don Eckert
Springettsbury Township Board of Supervisors
1501 Mt. Zion Road
York, PA 17402
717-757-3521

Don Bishop
Springettsbury Township Board of Supervisors
1501 Mt. Zion Road
York, PA 17402
717-757-3521

Bill Schenck
Springettsbury Township Board of Supervisors
1501 Mt. Zion Road
York, PA 17402
717-757-3521

Robert A. Minnich
York County Commissioner
1 West Market Way, 4th Floor
York, PA 17401
717-771-9675

Christopher B. Reilly
York County Commissioner
1 West Market Way, 4th Floor
York, PA 17401
717-771-9675

Shirley L. Glass
York County Commissioner
1 West Market Way, 4th Floor
York, PA 17401
717-771-9675

D. EPA Officials

Bill Hudson (3HW43)
Community Involvement Coordinator
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region III
1650 Arch St.
Philadelphia, PA 19103-2029
215-814-5532
800-553-2509
hudson.william@epa.gov

John Banks (3HW22)
Remedial Project Manager
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region III
1650 Arch St.
Philadelphia, PA 19103-2029
215-814-3214
banks.john-d@epa.gov

E. State Agencies

Tony Martinelli
Project Officer
Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection
Environmental Cleanup Program
1 Ararat Boulevard
Harrisburg, PA 19110
717-783-7816

F. Media

Newspapers/Publications

York Daily Record
P.O. Box 15122
York, PA 17405-7122
717-771-2000
717-771-2009 FAX

York Dispatch
205 North George Street
York, PA 17401
717-854-1575
717-843-2814 FAX

Radio Stations

WARM/WSBA
Cathy Clark, News Director
P.O. Box 910
York, PA 17402
717-764-1155

WEGK/WOYK
Slim Walker, News Director
1360 Copenhaffer Road
York, PA 17404
717-266-6606

WQXA/WXKU
Lauren Hirsch, News Director
919 Radio Road
Elizabethtown, PA 17022
717-757-9402

WHVR/WYCR
Diana Forney, News Director
P.O. Box 234
Hanover, PA 17331
717-637-3831

Television Stations

WHP &WLYH
Bob Cashen, News Director
3300 North Sixth Street
Harrisburg, PA 17110
717-238-2100

WGAL
Jim O'Reilly, Assignment Manager
P. O. Box 7127
Lancaster, PA 17604
717-393-5851

WHTM
News Director
P.O. Box 5860
Harrisburg, PA 17110
717-236-2727

WPMT
Public Affairs Manager
2005 South Queen Street
York, PA 17403
717-843-0043

APPENDIX B: Public Meeting Location and Local Stenographic Information

Public Meeting Location

Springettsbury Township Municipal Building
1501 Mt. Zion Road
York, PA 17402
717-757-3521

Contacts:
Ms. Lori Mitrick, Board of Supervisors Chairperson
Mr. Paul Amic, Township Manager

Resources:
Tables, chairs, air conditioning, podium, and restrooms are available. The building is accessible to the handicapped and has a capacity of 75 persons.

Local Stenographic Information

York Stenographic Services, Inc.
34 North George Street
York, PA 17402
717-854-0077

Rinehart Reporting Service
2482 Onyx Road
York, PA 17402
717-764-2820

Filius and McLucas Reporting Service
1427 East Market Street
York, PA 17402
717-845-6418

Key Reporters
1300 Garrison Drive
York, PA 17402
717-764-7801

APPENDIX C: Information Repositories

Springettsbury Township Municipal Building
1501 Mt. Zion Road
York, PA 17402

Contact:
Mr. Paul Amic, Township Manager
717-757-3521

Hours:
Monday through Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

United States Environmental Protection Agency
Region III 
Administrative File Room
1650 Arch Street
Philadelphia, PA 19103-2029

Contact:
Ms. Anna Butch, Administrative Record Coordinator
215-814-3157

Hours:
Monday through Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

APPENDIX D: Glossary of Technical Terms

Administrative Record
The official file containing the Remedial Investigation, Feasibility Study, Risk Assessment, and other site-related documents which provide the basis for EPA's selection of a remedial long-term cleanup-alternative at a Superfund site.
Cleanup
An action taken to deal with a release or threatened release of hazardous substances that could adversely affect public health and/or the environment. The word "cleanup" is used to refer to both short-term (removal) actions and long-term (remedial) actions at Superfund sites.
Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA)
A Federal law (commonly known as "Superfund") passed in 1980 and modified in 1986 by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA). The law gave EPA the authority to investigate sites where there is a suspected threat to public health or the environment caused by the release or potential release of hazardous substances. The law also created a special tax on the chemical and petroleum industries. Monies collected under the tax are deposited into a trust fund to be used to clean up abandoned or uncontrolled waste sites. Under the law, EPA can pay for site cleanup when the parties responsible for site contamination cannot be located or are unwilling or unable to perform the cleanup, or EPA can take legal action to force parties responsible for site contamination to clean up the site or pay back the Federal government for the cost of the cleanup.
Feasibility Study (FS)
A study which identifies and evaluates site clean-up alternatives, then analyzes their benefits, limitations, and costs.
Ground Water
Fresh water that fills in gaps between soil, sand, and gravel underground. Ground water can be used as a source of drinking water.
Information Repository
A collection of documents about a specific Superfund site and the general Superfund process. EPA usually sets up the information repository in a public building that is conveniently located, accessible to the handicapped, and contains a photocopying machine.
National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP)
The Federal regulation that guides the Superfund program. The NCP was revised in 1990.
National Priorities List (NPL)
EPA's list of the nation's most serious uncontrolled or abandoned hazardous waste sites identified for possible long-term cleanup using Superfund money. EPA updates the NPL at least once a year.
Proposed Remedial Action Plan (Proposed Plan)
A Superfund site document which reviews the clean-up alternatives presented in the site Feasibility Study and identifies EPA's Preferred Alternative. Selection of a preferred alternative is not a closed-end commitment to use that alternative; rather, it is a way for EPA to indicate, based on experience and expertise, which alternative is the most likely course of action. EPA must actively solicit public review of and comment on all the alternatives under consideration.
Public Comment Period
A period during which the public can formally review and comment on various documents and EPA actions. For example, EPA holds a public comment period when it proposes to add sites to the National Priorities List. EPA also holds a minimum 30-day public comment period to enable community members to review and comment on a Proposed Plan.
Record of Decision (ROD)
A legal document that announces and explains the clean-up methods EPA will use at a National Priorities List site. The ROD is based on information and technical analysis generated during the Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study and on EPA's consideration of comments received during the public comment period.
Remedial Action
The actual construction or implementation phase that follows the Remedial Design of the selected clean-up alternative at a National Priorities List site.
Remedial Design
The engineering phase that follows the Record of Decision. During Remedial Design, technical drawings and specifications are developed for the remedial action at a site. These specifications are similar to a blueprint or work plan.
Remedial Investigation (RI)
A study which identifies the nature and extent of site contamination and determines the threat this contamination poses to human health and the environment.
Removal Action
An immediate, short-term clean-up action to address a release or threatened release of hazardous substances. This action is initiated to reduce or eliminate an immediate threat to public health and/or the environment.
Responsiveness Summary
A summary of oral and written comments (and EPA responses to those comments) EPA received during the public comment period. The Responsiveness Summary is part of the Record of Decision.
Superfund
The program operated under the legislative authority of CERCLA and SARA to update and improve environmental laws. The program has the authority to respond directly to releases or threatened releases of hazardous substances that may endanger public health, welfare, or the environment. The "Superfund" is a trust fund that can be used to finance clean-up actions at hazardous waste sites.
Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA)
Modifications to CERCLA enacted on October 17, 1986 which amended CERCLA and its requirements. SARA included amendments such as the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act and the Radon Gas and Indoor Air Quality Research Act.
Surface Water
Ponds, lakes, rivers, and other bodies of water naturally open to the atmosphere.
Technical Assistance Grant (TAG)
An EPA grant of up to $50,000 which can be awarded to a bona fide citizens group in a Superfund site area. The grant enables that group to hire a technical expert to review and interpret site reports issued by EPA or other parties.

APPENDIX E: Technical Assistance Grant Information

EPA provides Technical Assistance Grants (TAGs) of up to $50,000 as part of its Superfund community relations program. The Technical Assistance Grant program enables citizens in a site area to hire a technical expert to review and interpret site reports generated by EPA or other parties. Complete information on Technical Assistance Grants is contained in an EPA document titled The Citizens' Guidance Manual for the Technical Assistance Grant Program. This document is available at the local information repository designated in Appendix C of this Community Relations Plan. For additional information on how to apply for a Technical Assistance Grant, contact:

Bill Hudson (3HW43)
Community Involvement Coordinator
U. S. EPA Region III
1650 Arch Street
Philadelphia, PA 19103-2029
800-553-2509
215-814-5532

EPA accepts applications for Technical Assistance Grants as mandated by the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act. Only one group per site can receive a Technical Assistance Grant, so EPA urges local groups to join together to apply.

The following are Federal publications on the Technical Assistance Grant program which can be obtained by calling EPA's publications number: 800-553-6847.

APPENDIX F: Sample Community Interview Questions

Region 3 | Mid-Atlantic Cleanup | Mid-Atlantic Superfund |EPA Home | EPA Superfund Homepage


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