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Woodlawn County Landfill

Current Site Information

EPA Region 3 (Mid-Atlantic)

Maryland
Cecil County
Woodlawn

EPA ID# MDD980504344

7th Congressional District

Last Update: January 2015

Other Names


Woodlawn Transfer Station

Current Site Status

In 2005, the first five year review of the remedy certified that the remedy for this site continues to operate as intended and is sufficient to ensure the current protection of human health and the environment. Long term protectiveness will be provided by institutional controls prohibiting drinking water wells in the contaminated plume area and ensuring that any future use of the property will not impair the effectiveness of the landfill cover. The second five year review was conducted, with a report issued in December 2010. That report again certified that the site remedy continues to be protective of human health and the environment because exposure pathways that could result in unacceptable risks are being controlled.

Site Description

The Woodlawn County Landfill site covers approximately 37 acres in Cecil County, Maryland. The property was a privately owned sand and gravel quarry before it was purchased by the County in 1960. The county owned and operated the site as a municipal landfill from 1960 until 1978 when the state issued an order that prohibited the county from placing additional municipal wastes into the landfill. During operation of the landfill, two large quarrying pits were filled with agricultural, municipal, and industrial wastes. State records document the disposal of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) sludge at the site by the Firestone Tire & Rubber Company (now Bridgestone/Firestone, Inc.). The PVC sludge, which contained residual vinyl chloride, a known human carcinogen, was initially disposed of throughout the landfill. Between 1978 and 1981, after the landfill was closed to municipal waste, the PVC sludge was deposited into three segregated disposal cells. Analyses conducted by the State and potentially responsible parties (PRPs) showed the presence of contamination in on-site groundwater and soils, off-site ground water, and surface water and sediments of a stream that crosses the site. The stream enters Basin Run, a state-designated trout stream, about two miles from the site. The local aquifer is the only water supply available to area residents. Currently, the county operates a municipal waste transfer station at the entrance to the site.

Site Responsibility

Cleanup of this site is the responsibility of federal and state governments, and parties potentially responsible for site contamination.

NPL Listing History

The site was proposed to the National Priorities List of the most serious uncontrolled or abandoned hazardous waste sites requiring long term remedial action on January 22, 1987. The site was formally added to the list July 22, 1987.

Threats and Contaminants

The groundwater was contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs), primarily vinyl chloride and 1,2-dichloroethane, and with polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), pesticides and metals, primarily manganese. The potential for exposure to contaminated groundwater at the site posed a threat to human health. Levels of mercury in soils affected by past discharges from the transfer station's septic system exceeded the level that EPA has determined is protective of wildlife.

Contaminant descriptions and risk factors are available from the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, an arm of the CDC.

Cleanup Progress

In 2005, the first five year review of the remedy certified that the remedy for this site continues to operate as intended and is currently protective of human health and the environment. Long term protectiveness will be provided by institutional controls prohibiting drinking water wells in the contaminated plume area and ensuring that any future use of the property will not impair the effectiveness of the landfill cover. The second five year review was conducted, with a report issued in December 2010. That report again certified that the site remedy is protective of human health and the environment because exposure pathways that could result in unacceptable risks are being controlled.

Contacts

Site Contacts

Administrative Record Locations

Region 3 | Mid-Atlantic Cleanup | Mid-Atlantic Superfund |EPA Home | EPA Superfund Homepage


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