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Middletown Road Dump

Current Site Information

EPA Region 3 (Mid-Atlantic)

Maryland
Anne Arundel County
Off Maryland Route 50
near Annapolis

EPA ID# MDD980705099

3rd Congressional District

Last Update: February 2013
Final Update

Other Names


Dale Dickerson Dump

Current Site Status

On April 18, 1998, the EPA deleted this site from the National Priorities List (NPL), which is the list of hazardous waste sites requiring long-term investigation and cleanup. In 1983, EPA and the state conducted an emergency cleanup to eliminate immediate threats from the contamination. During and after the emergency cleanup, the EPA and the state conducted an intensive investigation of the long-term risks posed by the site. The investigation showed that the emergency cleanup actions had been successful in eliminating the hazardous wastes and that no threat to public health or the environment remained. In September 2002, EPA issued the final Five Year Review Report for the site. The report concluded that the selected remedy of "no action" continues to be protective of human health and the environment, and samples taken since then confirm this. Based on the finding of the final report the Middletown Road Dump Site does not pose a threat to human health or the environment; therefore, no further Five-Year Reviews will be conducted for this site.

Site Description

The Middletown Road Dump, situated on approximately 15 acres, is a privately owned dump located off Route 50 near Annapolis, Maryland. The now inactive dump took in rubble, construction debris, and municipal and industrial waste for several decades without proper state permits. In 1981, about 40 crushed and deteriorating drums and four dumpster loads of debris contaminated with hazardous substances, such as paint sludges and solvents, were discovered on the site. Soil was contaminated with the heavy metals lead, aluminum, chromium, zinc, cyanide, barium, and cadmium. Unrestricted access to the site created the opportunity for people to come in contact with contaminated wastes. Contamination threatened the groundwater and nearby surface water. That year, the state shut down the dump because of violations of state water pollution and hazardous waste laws. Approximately 5,000 people live within 1 mile of the site. About 2,500 people within 3 miles of the site are served by groundwater from both public and private wells.

Site Responsibility

Cleanup of this site was the responsibility of federal and state governments.

NPL Listing History

This site was proposed to the National Priorities List of the most serious uncontrolled or abandoned hazardous waste sites requiring long term remedial action on December 30, 1982. The site was formally added to the list September 8, 1983, making it eligible for federal cleanup funds. The site was deleted from the list on April 18, 1988.

Threats and Contaminants

Prior to cleanup, the site contained drums of wastes which included paint sludges, solvents, and heavy metals. Some drums were crushed, and some were ruptured and/or deteriorating. Soil was contaminated with heavy metals such as lead, aluminum, chromium, zinc, cyanide, barium, and cadmium. Access to the site was unrestricted, making the risk of direct contact with contaminated areas possible. Cleanup activities removed the contaminated materials and eliminated the threats.

Contaminant descriptions and risk factors are available from the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, an arm of the CDC.

Cleanup Progress

Construction Completed

In 1983, EPA and the state conducted an emergency cleanup to eliminate immediate threats from contamination. Contaminated media removed from the site included 68 drums, 70 contaminated tires, 610 tons of contaminated soil, and numerous 5-gallon pails of marine paint. EPA and the state conducted an intensive investigation of site conditions during and after the emergency cleanup. The study evaluated groundwater, surface water, soil, air quality, and sediment quality in the vicinity of the site. EPA concluded that the emergency cleanup actions had been successful in eliminating the hazardous wastes and that no threat to public health or the environment remained. Declaring that no further cleanup action was warranted, EPA, with agreement from the state, deleted the site from the NPL in April 1988. EPA's Office of Inspector General conducted an overflight imaging to identify possible contamination oat the Site and followed up with field sampling and analysis. The results were compared to risk based concentrations and EPA Region 3 is reviewing the results to evaluate the need for further action.

Contacts

Site Contacts

Administrative Record Locations

Region 3 | Mid-Atlantic Cleanup | Mid-Atlantic Superfund |EPA Home | EPA Superfund Homepage


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