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Route 940 Drum Dump

Current Site Information

EPA Region 3 (Mid-Atlantic)

Pennsylvania
Monroe County
Tobyhanna Township
Pocono Summit

EPA ID# PAD981034630

11th Congressional District

Last Update: August 2004
Final Update

Other Names


Pocono Summit

Current Site Status

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency oversaw the cleanup of the Route 940 Drum Dump site and it was deleted from the agency's National Priorities List of the nation's most hazardous waste sites. EPA stated in 1992 that no additional work needed to be done at the site, other than groundwater monitoring which was to be checked to ensure that the groundwater was clean. The site was deleted from the NPL in November 2000.

Site Description

The Route 940 Drum Dump site located in Monroe County, Pennsylvania is a 2 ½-acre site in Pocono Summit. In the 1970s, as many as 600 drums of unknown materials were stored on the site and in early 1983, the state was informed that some drums may have been buried on site. Later that year, the state detected volatile organic compounds (VOCs), chemical components of solvents, in on-site soils. Several organic chemicals also were detected in on-site groundwater. Thirty buried drums containing VOCs and heavy metals subsequently were discovered. Access to the site was restricted by a fence. Approximately 4,200 people depended on private wells and small public wells within three miles of the site as their sole source of drinking water. Indian River Creek, about a mile from the site, is used for fishing. Recreational fishing and hunting occur in the area surrounding the site.

The groundwater and soil were contaminated with various VOCs that had leaked from buried drums on the site. The possibility of high concentrations of VOCs in the soil being transmitted through the air was thought to pose a threat to area residents. In addition, direct contact with contaminated areas or contamination of the drinking water supply may have posed a risk to the nearby public. These threats were all addressed by the clean-up activities conducted at the site.

Site Responsibility

This site was addressed through federal, state, and potentially responsible parties' actions.

NPL Listing History

Our country's most serious, uncontrolled, or abandoned hazardous waste sites can be cleaned using federal money. To be eligible for federal cleanup money a site must be put on the National Priorities List. This site was proposed to the list on September 18, 1985 and formally added to the list July 22, 1987.

Threats and Contaminants

The groundwater and soil were contaminated with various VOCs that leaked from buried drums on the site. The possibility of high concentrations of VOCs in the soil being transmitted through the air posed a threat to area residents. In addition, direct contact with contaminated areas or contamination of the drinking water supply may have posed a risk to the nearby public. These threats were all addressed by the clean-up activities conducted at the site.

Contaminant descriptions and risk factors are available from the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, an arm of the CDC.

Cleanup Progress

Under state supervision in 1983, Landmark International, a potentially responsible party (PRP), installed monitoring wells, excavated and removed 100 drums, and stockpiled contaminated soils on site. From 1983 to 1984, EPA removed buried containers suspected to contain pathogenic organisms. Also, EPA removed 131 full bottles and hundreds of broken containers from the site and disposed of them in an approved landfill. Ten drums of non-hazardous waste also were landfilled offsite. In 1988 stockpiled soil was passed through a soil shredder and neutralized. These early actions removed the source of site contamination, reducing the potential for contamination of water supplies from the site.

In 1990, EPA took over the investigation from the PRPs because of delays in their performance of the work. This investigation explored the nature and extent of soil and groundwater problems and recommended the best strategies for final cleanup. The investigation was completed in 1992 and EPA determined that as a result of the immediate actions performed by the PRPs, EPA, and the State, no further cleanup actions were needed. EPA issued a No Further Action Record of Decision for the site in 1992. Annual groundwater monitoring was conducted for five years at the site to ensure the effectiveness of the cleanup. The site was deleted from the NPL in November 2000.

Contacts

Site Contacts

Administrative Record Locations

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