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Arrowhead Associates

Current Site Information

EPA Region 3 (Mid-Atlantic)

Virginia
Westmoreland County
Near Montross

EPA ID# VAD042916361

1st Congressional District

Last Update: February 2014

Other Names


Scovill Corporation

Current Site Status

The U.S. EPA issued a public document to change the cleanup plan for contaminated soil in September 1998. This document, called an Explanation of Significant Differences (ESD), left intact part of the original cleanup method selected in the September 29, 1991 Record of Decision (ROD). The ROD called for treating contamination on site and installing a pump and treat system to clean up the groundwater. The ESD replaced the pump and treat elements of the remedy with a permeable reactive subsurface barriers system (PRSB). The main advantage of the new plan is the ability to treat the groundwater while it remains below ground rather than pumping the water for above ground treatment.

Saltire (formerly Scovill Corp.), the potentially responsible party (PRP), proposed to construct an impermeable surface cap as part of the PRSB System to reduce the amount of groundwater that would be treated. The proposed cap would cover approximately four and one-half acres. On September 29, 2001, EPA signed a ROD Amendment, approving the PRSB/Cap system to treat groundwater. The PRP began constructing the PRSB/Cap System on February 4, 2002. The PRP was operating a soil vapor extraction system (SVE) , which was cleaning up contaminated subsurface soil located behind and on the side of the manufacturing building. On September 23, 2002, EPA and Virginia Deparment of Quality (VDEQ) performed a final inspection of the Site. On September 27, 2002 EPA signed a Preliminary Close out Report, which noted that under the supervision of EPA , Saltire had completed all construction activities at the Site. Saltire initiated the surface water and groundwater monitoring program in January 2003. Saltire filed for bankruptcy during the later part of 2004.

EPA has started the Long Term Response Action at the site. EPA has developing an environmental monitoring plan to insure that the Scates Branches are protected by the remedy. EPA has collected subsurface soil vapor samples and found that elevated concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) under the manufacturing building. Subsequently, EPA collected indoor air samples during the winter of 2011and found that VOCs were not found in the office area and most of the building. EPA collect additional indoor air samples during the summer of 2011, and VOCs were found in the building. The O’Gara Group purchased  the building.  EPA issued the company a removal order to install a mitigation system to remove any VOCs from air inside the building. EPA has collected samples of the PRSB to see if there are missing sections of the PRSB. There are missing sections. EPA determined that the PRSB is treating groundwater, but not as effectively as it was designed, and the PRSB does not treat 1,4-dioxane, which was found in groundwater after the remedy was implemented. EPA has checked the monitoring wells to see if dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) are down-gradient from the PRSB. DNAPLs do not appear to be present in down-gradient monitoring wells There will be another operable unit (OU3) to address VOCs under the building, 1,4-dioxane in groundwater, and air modeling of the air coming out of the vent whcih extents vertically from the cap. Other alternatives will be evaluated to treat ground water under OU3.

Site Description

The Arrowhead Associates/Scovill Corp. site is located on 30 acres in a rural area in Westmoreland County, Virginia. The Scovill Corp. electroplated cosmetic cases from 1966 to 1972, when Arrowhead, Inc. of Delaware acquired the business and its assets. Arrowhead continued the electroplating operations until 1979. From 1979 to 1981, Arrowhead also filled the cases with cosmetics. From 1981 to the present, A.R. Winarick has assembled and filled cases with cosmetics, and beginning in the early 1980s to the present, Mattatuck Manufacturing has fabricated automobile wire harnesses at the site. Plating wastes were treated in a surface impoundment system and discharged to Scates Branch under a permit issued through the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System. After the plating operations ended in 1979, process equipment and materials were abandoned at the site. An estimated 1,100 people obtain drinking water from shallow private wells within three miles of the site. A coastal wetland is about one mile from the site and local surface water is used for recreational activities. High levels of VOCs, chemical components of solvents and degreasers, in the groundwater at the site pose a significant threat. The contamination plume extends off-site and into Scates Branch and the South Fork Scates Branch where groundwater discharges to the stream. Surface soil sampling did not indicate a widespread presence of contamination; VOCs, metals, and cyanide were found in a few locations. In subsurface soil, high levels of VOCs were found in two former drum storage areas and in one of the former pond areas. High levels of heavy metals were detected in the area of the former disposal ponds.

Site Responsibility

Cleanup of this site is the responsibility of federal and state governments, and parties potentially responsible for site contamination.

NPL Listing History

This site was proposed to the National Priorities List of the most serious uncontrolled or abandoned hazardous waste sites requiring long-term remedial action on June 24, 1988. This site was formally added to the list February 21, 1990, making it eligible for federal cleanup.

Threats and Contaminants

Contaminant descriptions and risk factors are available from the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, an arm of the CDC.

Cleanup Progress

In 1986, EPA entered into an Administrative Order on Consent (AOC) that required Scovill Corp. to conduct a two-phase removal action. Scovill removed wastes and contaminated materials from the site including 300 drums containing benzene, paints, lacquers, thinners, metal plating wastes, cyanide, residual process wastes, damaged tanks, interior piping, and deteriorated concrete inside the manufacturing building. In 1988, approximately 395 cubic yards of contaminated soil were removed from the drum disposal area and disposed of off-site. Contaminated wastewater from the six disposal lagoons was treated and discharged to Scates Branch. Also, soils and sludges from the lagoons were removed and disposed of off-site. In 1990, the lagoons were filled, graded, and revegetated, and erosion control measures were installed. A.R. Winarick, the former owner of the building, ceased filling cosmetic cases at the site in 1992. Winarick left approximately 450 drums and other containers of paints, lacquers, thinners, benzene, and lipstick in the building. EPA initiated a removal action in 1997 to remove the materials that were left by A.R. Winarick. In January 1997, Scovill began the Remedial Design (RD) for the groundwater pump and treatment system and in-situ soil vapor extraction system. Scovill Corporation has proposed that a PRSB be used to treat the contaminated groundwater. On September 19, 1998, EPA approved an ESD for the subsurface barriers. On September 28, 2001, EPA signed a ROD Amendment, approving the PRSB/Cap System to treat contaminated ground water. Saltire initiated the construction of the PRSB/Cap System on February 5, 2002. On September 23, 2002, EPA and Virginia Deparment of Quality (VDEQ) performed a final inspection of the Site. On September 27, 2002 EPA signed a Preliminary Close out Report, which noted that under the supervision EPA , Saltire had completed all construction activities at the Site. Saltire initiated the surface water and ground water monitoring progam in January 2003. In October 2003, Saltire collected confirmatory soil samples from two areas that were being cleaned up with the SVE system. The soil in one of the areas was determined to be cleaned, but the other area was not clean. Saltire declared bankruptcy in 2004.

EPA has started the Long Term Response Action at the site. EPA is developing an environmental monitoring plan to insure that the Scates Branches are protected by the remedy. EPA has collected subsurface soil air samples and found that elevated concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) under the manufacturing building. Subsequently, EPA collected indoor air samples during the winter of 2011and found that VOCs were not found in the office area and most of the building. EPA collect additional indoor air samples during the summer of 2011, and VOCs were found in the building.The O’Gara Group has purchased the building.  EPA issued the company a removal order to install a mitigation system to remove VOCs from air in the building.  The mitigation system has been installed, and the O’Gara Group continues indoor air monitoring. EPA has collected samples of the PRSB to see if there are missing sections of the PRSB. There are missing sections. EPA has checked the monitoring wells to see if dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) are down-gradient from the PRSB. DNAPLs do not appear to be present in down-gradient monitoring wells. EPA has evaluated the effectiveness of the PRB and has concluded that the PRB is not treating groundwater as it was designed.There will be another operable unit (OU3) to address VOCs under the building, 1,4-dioxane in ground water, outdoor air modeling of air coming out of the vent, which extends from the cap.  In addition, OU3 will evaluated new alternatives that can used to treat contaminated ground water.

Contacts

Site Contacts

Administrative Record Locations

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