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Drake Chemical

EPA Weekly Situation Reports for January 1999

U. S. ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS
DRAKE CHEMICAL SUPERFUND SITE

182 MYRTLE STREET
LOCK HAVEN, PA 17745
PHONE 717-748-4505
FAX 717-748-7549

Wednesday, January 20, 1999

FOR DATES: From 7:00 a.m. Wednesday, January 13, 1999 to 7:00 a.m. Wednesday, January 20, 1999.

The Thermal Destruction Facility (TDF) was on-line for 132.9 hours and processed 3977 tons of contaminated soil during the time frame of this report. The TDF was on-line 79.1 % of the time with an average hourly feed rate of 29.9 tons per hour while on-line. The contractor, OHM, continues to work 24 hours a day, 7 days a week operating and maintaining the TDF.

The contractor has successfully treated approximately 232,804 tons of contaminated soil, which amounts to approximately 82.2 % of the overall contaminated soil on-site.

Hazardous waste feed was stopped for an extended period of time during the time frame of this report in order to perform maintenance to the TDF. Hazardous waste feed was initially shut down on Monday, January 17, 1999 at 0226 hours in order to replace an expansion joint on the double dump valve, which connects the Dry Ash Drag (DAD) conveyor to the Wet Ash Drag (WAD) conveyor. During the down time, OHM inspected the several components of the TDF and cleaned out the WAD steam scrubber. TDF inspections revealed that some minor preventative maintenance was required to the DAD. Later on Monday, when the contractor attempted to restart the incinerator, the WAD drive chain broke, which required additional down time to repair. Feed was resumed on Tuesday, January 19, 1999 at 1253 hours.

Nestlerode Construction, OHM's specialty subcontractor, began installing the H-pile support system along the sheet steel that separates the clean side of the site from the exclusion zone. Once the sheet steel support system is installed, a system of whalers will be installed to support the sheetpiling, and once the structural support system is completed, excavation will continue to elevation 545.

Construction activities during the time frame of this report included TDF operations, wastewater management, wood shredding, feed preparation, debris separation, lime treatment of soils, ash handling, ash backfilling, dust control to prevent fugitive emissions, dry decontamination and backfilling of rock and concrete debris. The contractor continued to perform off-site and perimeter air monitoring (PAM) activities.

Excavation activities were continued along the southern end of the exclusion zone. The excavation crew continued to uncover discarded drums, drum carcasses and demolition debris in the general vicinity of the former debris separation building. Additional drum carcasses and 10 intact drums were unearthed and separated during this reporting period. The initial Health and Safety scan of each intact drum indicated that the drums contained non-volatile product; however, three of the drums were constructed from what appeared to be stainless steel. As a safety precaution, these drums were considered to be potentially hazardous and were immediately overpacked and separated from the main staging area. The USACE and OHM are reviewing alternative methods to safely sample the contents of the sealed stainless steel drums.

Two roll-off trailer containers were shipped off-site to a hazardous waste landfill. The roll-offs contained drum carcasses that had been decontaminated in the exclusion zone. Nine intact drums, which had been excavated during this week and the previous week's reporting period, were sampled and placed in overpack containers. The samples of the drum contents were sent to the contractor's analytical laboratory for fingerprint analyses, which include several chemical reactivity and compatibility tests. Once the compatibility of the contents is determined, those compatible drum contents will be combined and shipped off-site to a licensed disposal facility.

Related site activities included:

* A weekly progress meeting was held on Tuesday, January 19, 1999, with representatives from the USEPA, PADEP, USACE, and OHM in attendance.

* An assistant to Dr. R. Stehouwer, a Penn State Soil Science Professor, sampled the bottom ash from the bottom ash backfill area in order to test the thermally treated soil's ability to support plant life.

Major activities for the next week include: Operation of the TDF, soil feed preparation, excavation, drum handling, lime treatment of soil, off-site and perimeter air monitoring activities, WWTP operations, pile driving, ash handling, ash backfilling, rock & inorganic debris handling, rock cleaning, and rock backfilling.

PREPARED BY: Steve Gibson for William Werntges(USACE)


Wednesday, January 13, 1999

FOR DATES: From 7:00 a.m. Wednesday, January 6, 1999 to 7:00 a.m. Wednesday, January 13, 1999.

The Thermal Destruction Facility (TDF) was on-line for 161.2 hours and processed 4992.9 tons of contaminated soil during the time frame of this report. The TDF was on-line 96.0 % of the time with an average hourly feed rate of 31.0 tons per hour while on-line. The contractor, OHM, continues to work 24 hours a day, 7 days a week operating and maintaining the TDF.

The contractor has successfully treated approximately 226,245 tons of contaminated soil, which amounts to approximately 80.0 % of the overall contaminated soil on-site.

At 0834 hours on Tuesday, January 12, 1999, OHM stopped hazardous waste feed to the incinerator in order to perform the monthly interlock checks of the TDF. The interlock checks were performed in order to test the automatic shut down systems of the incinerator. As part of the interlock checks, a planned Thermal Relief Valve (TRV) opening was initiated at 1058 hours. Prior to the TRV opening, hazardous waste feed to the incinerator had been off-line for approximately 2.5 hours and the proper regulatory authorities had been notified. In addition to the monthly interlock checks, the monthly calibrations to the TDF equipment and sensors were performed.

At the completion of the monthly interlock checks, the TDF was placed in hot hold while preventative maintenance was performed on the dual feed screws. Maintenance included the addition of packing material to the screws, the realignment of the feed screw gears and tightening of the feed screw drive chain. Hazardous waste feed to the incinerator was resumed at 1414 hours on Tuesday, January 12, 1999.

As stated in the previous weekly reports, OHM and the USACE were investigating methods to improve the feed rate to the rotary kiln through the dual feed screws. Hazardous waste feed to the incinerator was significantly improved by mixing site soil with hydrated lime and quick lime and also by increasing the rotational speed of the dual feed screws. OHM and the USACE will continue to investigate the soil feed rates in order to approach the target value of 40 tons per hour.

Nestlerode Construction, OHM's specialty subcontractor, mobilized to the exclusion zone in order to install an H-pile support system along the sheet steel that separates the clean side of the site from the exclusion zone. The structural support system will allow excavation adjacent to the sheet steel to the termination depth of 545 feet..

Construction activities during the time frame of this report included TDF operations, wastewater management, wood shredding, feed preparation, debris separation, lime treatment of soils, ash handling, ash backfilling, dust control to prevent fugitive emissions, dry decontamination and backfilling of rock and concrete debris. The contractor continued to perform off-site and perimeter air monitoring (PAM) activities.

Excavation activities were continued along the southern end of the exclusion zone, in the general vicinity of the former debris separation building. The excavation crew continued to uncover discarded drums, drum carcasses and demolition debris. Additional drum carcasses and 22 intact drums were unearthed and separated during this reporting period. The initial Health and Safety scan of each intact drum indicated that the drums contained non-volatile product. The intact drums were wrapped in thick polyethylene sheets and stockpiled for overpacking and sampling.

Two roll-off trailer containers of PPE and metal debris were shipped off-site to a hazardous waste landfill. The 32 intact drums that had been excavated during this week and the previous week's reporting period were sampled and placed in overpack containers. The samples of the drum contents were sent to the contractor's analytical laboratory for fingerprint analyses, which include chemical reactivity and compatibility testing. Once the compatibility of the contents is determined, those compatible drum contents will be combined and shipped off-site to a licensed disposal facility.

Related site activities included a weekly progress meeting, which was held on Tuesday, January 12, 1999, with representatives from the USEPA, PADEP, USACE, and OHM in attendance.

Major activities for the next week include: Operation of the TDF, soil feed preparation, excavation, drum handling, lime treatment of soil, off-site and perimeter air monitoring activities, WWTP operations, pile driving, ash handling, ash backfilling, rock & inorganic debris handling, rock cleaning, and rock backfilling.

PREPARED BY: Steve Gibson for William Werntges(USACE)

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