Jump to main content.


Ohio River Park

COMMUNITY RELATIONS PLAN

Neville Township, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania

March 1997

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
Philadelphia, PA 19107

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Superfund Community Relations Program is committed to promoting two-way communication between citizens and the Agency.

Our community relations activities are designed to inform the public of the nature of the environmental issues associated with the Ohio River Park Site,the potential threat these issues may pose to the surrounding community,the responses under consideration to remedy these issues,and the progress being made to implement the remedy.

Our on-going community relations efforts aim to provide the opportunity for interested citizens to comment on,and provide input to, decisions about clean-up actions at the Ohio River Park Site.

For information about EPA's Community Relations Program at the Ohio River Park Superfund Site, contact Patrick Gaughan, Community Involvement Coordinator, at (304) 234-0238.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

  1. Overview of the Community Relations Process
  2. Capsule Site Description
    1. Site Description
    2. Site Ownership
    3. Site History
    4. Enforcement Activities
  3. Community Background
    1. Community Profile
    2. History of Community Involvement
    3. Summary of Community Concerns for the Site
  4. EPA's Community Relations Program
    1. The Goals of EPA's Community Relations Program
    2. EPA's Community Relations Activities for the Site 

TABLES

  1. Summary of Community Relations Activities 

APPENDICES

  1. Interested Parties and Contact List
  2. Information Repositories and Public Meeting Locations
  3. Technical Assistance Grant (TAG) Information
  4. About EPA
  5. Glossary and Acronyms

Section 1.0: Overview of the Community Relations Process

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) developed this Community Relations Plan (CRP) to encourage two-way communication between the community surrounding the Ohio River Park Superfund Site (the site) and EPA and to encourage community involvement in site activities. This CRP has been prepared to aid EPA in developing a community relations program tailored to the needs of the community affected by the site. EPA will use the community relations activities outlined in this plan as a tool for increasing communication and involvement.

Preparation of a CRP is required under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA), as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA). CERCLA, commonly known as Superfund, authorizes cleanup of abandoned or uncontrolled hazardous waste sites placed on the National Priorities List (NPL). This action makes the site a priority requiring compliance with CERCLA.

This CRP specifically takes into account the special concerns and characteristics of the community affected by site activities. Information in the CRP is based primarily on community interviews conducted in October 1996. Parties interviewed included residents and local officials of Neville Township and Coraopolis Borough; a local citizen's group; and local media representatives.

EPA conducts community relations activities to ensure that the public has input in the Superfund decision-making process and to keep the community well informed about the progress of Superfund activities. EPA plans community relations activities to address citizens' concerns as they peak when milestones in the Superfund process are reached. The plan also provides methods for answering community questions and addressing concerns on an on-going basis. The EPA Region III Office will oversee the planned technical and community relations work at the site.

This CRP includes the following sections:

Capsule Site Description
A description and brief history of the Ohio River Park Superfund Site, and a discussion of site enforcement activities.
Community Background
A community profile, a history of public involvement at the site, and a summary of key community concerns.
EPA's Community Relations Program
The goals of this community relations program, the approaches EPA will take to implement them effectively, and the specific community relations activities planned for the Ohio River Park Superfund Site.
Appendices
A list of contacts and interested parties; information repository locations and public meeting sites; Technical Assistance Grant (TAG) information; about EPA; a glossary and a list of acronyms; and a sample fact sheet and public notice.

Section 2.0: Capsule Site Description

Section 2.1: Site Description

The Ohio River Park Superfund Site (the site) consists of 32 acres located on the western end of Neville Island, approximately 10 miles downstream from the city of Pittsburgh. The Ohio River borders the site to the north and the Back Channel of the Ohio River borders the site to the south. The site is accessible from the mainland via the new Coraopolis Bridge which links Coraopolis Township with Neville Island.

Land use on Neville Island generally is industrial/commercial, although there are some residential areas. The western portion of the island includes the hazardous waste site; the middle section of the island, between the site and Highway I-79, is mostly residential and commercial; and the eastern end of the island is heavily industrialized. Most of the 1,273 residents live in the area between the Coraopolis Bridge and Highway I-79. Properties of the nearest residents abut the eastern boundary of the site.

To address the site contamination, EPA divided the site into three sections or Operable Units (OUs). Operable Unit One (OU1) includes the contaminated soil and buried waste at the site. Operable Unit Two (OU2) consists of the soil contamination in the bridge area. Operable Unit Three (OU3) consists of the contamination found in the ground water, surface water, and sediments at the site. In the following subsections, the OUs are discussed in chronological order.

Section 2.2: Site Ownership

Pittsburgh Coke and Iron Company purchased the site in the 1920s. On October 19, 1944, Pittsburgh Coke and Iron Company changed its name to Pittsburgh Coke and Chemical Company (PC&C). PC&C ceased all operations at the site between 1965 and 1966. At that time, PC&C merged into Wilmington Securities, Inc., the parent corporation of the Neville Land Company.

Section 2.3: Site History

Prior to the 1940s, the predominant land use at the site was agricultural. Beginning in the mid-1930s until the mid-1950s, a portion of the site was used for municipal landfill operations, including the disposal of domestic trash and construction debris. Industrial waste disposal operations occurred at the site from 1952 until the 1960s. PC&C ceased its Neville Island facility operations in 1966.

PC&C manufactured three types of products at its Neville Island facility: mineral products, specialty chemical products, and agricultural chemicals. These are summarized below:

Available information indicates that PC&C disposed their industrial waste at the site. PC&C used two methods of waste disposal at the site; the company placed wet wastes into trenches and piled dry wastes on the surface (see Figure 3). EPA identified 54 trenches that PC&C used for waste disposal. Figure 4 on the following page shows the approximate disposal locations of various wastes at the site.

Historical waste sampling analysis identified several categories of waste at the site:

In 1977, Neville Land Company donated the land comprising the site to Allegheny County for construction of a park. During site excavation, the county uncovered various wastes, including 30 drums containing liquid waste. Allegheny County determined the presence of hazardous wastes at the site in 1979 and halted construction of the park. The county never opened the park to the public, and subsequently dismantled most of the park's new construction. After discovery of hazardous waste at the site, Allegheny County transferred the title of the land back to Neville Land Company in 1980.

Section 2.4: Enforcement Activities

Under the Superfund program, EPA investigates numerous hazardous waste sites throughout the United States. Upon discovery, EPA conducts an initial review of each site known as a Preliminary Assessment/Site Inspection (PA/SI). EPA completed a PA of the site in January 1979. In 1989, the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection or PADEP (formerly known as the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Resources - PADER), under agreement with EPA, conducted a SI. Results of the SI indicated the presence of hazardous substances including volatile organic compounds (VOCs), pesticides, and metals. EPA uses the PA/SIs to determine whether further action at a site is necessary. EPA then evaluates the site by using the Hazard Ranking System (HRS). The HRS is a mathematical measurement tool which assigns each site a score based on the possibility that contamination will spread through ground water, surface water, or air. It also takes into account other factors, such as the location of nearby residences. EPA places sites scoring over 28.5 on the NPL, making the site eligible to receive money for cleanup from Superfund. As a result of the PA/SI and other related studies, EPA proposed the Ohio River Park Site for inclusion on the NPL on October 16, 1989, based on a HRS score of 42.24. EPA placed the Ohio River Park Site on the NPL on August 30, 1990.

In November 1989, a contractor hired by EPA conducted sampling of the soil and sediment at the site. Results of the sampling showed the presence of hazardous substances including pesticides, arsenic, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The Health Assessment Team of the Pennsylvania Department of Health, in cooperation with the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), conducted a Health Assessment for the site and issued a report of their findings on June 24, 1991. The Health Assessment indicated that the site posed a threat to human health and the environment.

Operable Unit Two

In response to comments from Allegheny County, EPA investigated soil contamination in the southeastern corner of the site, known as OU2. EPA conducted this investigation to help resolve issues related to the Coraopolis Bridge replacement. Allegheny County wanted to build a new bridge to replace the existing deteriorating bridge which they often had to close temporarily during the winter months.

EPA and Allegheny County entered into an Administrative Order on Consent on February 2, 1992, requiring Allegheny County to perform a Remedial Investigation (RI) for OU2. Allegheny County conducted the investigation in several phases between May 1989 and April 1992. EPA approved the RI Report on November 30, 1992. The primary objective of the RI was to determine the type and amount of soil contamination at the bridge portion of the site. The RI consisted of a buried drum investigation, a geophysical survey, and soil sampling and analysis. The RI reported that although no drums were buried in the bridge portion of the site, there was limited soil contamination. Following this study, EPA completed a Baseline Risk Assessment to assess human health risks associated with the OU2 soil contamination. The results of the Risk Assessment showed that the soil contamination at the bridge portion of the site posed no risks to human health or the environment.

In January 1993, EPA issued a Proposed Plan that recommended a no action alternative for OU2. EPA preferred no action because the Risk Assessment indicated that the OU2 soil contamination posed no risks to human health or the environment.

EPA issued a Record of Decision (ROD) for OU2 on March 31, 1993, that stated no remedial action was required. Allegheny County has since built the new Coraopolis Bridge which currently is in operation.

Operable Unit One

In October 1991, EPA and Neville Land Company entered into an Administrative Order on Consent, whereby Neville Land Company agreed to conduct a Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS). The Order also stated that EPA and the state would provide oversight for the RI/FS activities at the site. Neville Land Company performed the investigative field work at the site in 1992 and 1993 and submitted the results of this investigation to EPA as the RI Report for OU1. EPA approved the RI Report in June 1994.

The RI results showed soil, buried waste, surface water, sediment, and ground water contamination at the site. Summaries of the contaminants EPA found in each of these media follow:

Neville Land Company and EPA completed an Ecological Risk Assessment for OU1 in November 1994. Based on the results of the RI, the primary contaminants associated with potential ecological risks at the site include:

Heavy metals tend to negatively affect the development and growth of both land and water-dwelling plants and animals. Pesticides generally act on the central nervous system, respiratory system, and the circulatory system. PCB exposure affects the reproduction of land and water-dwelling plants and animals. Harmful effects associated with PAH exposure include decreased survival, growth, and metabolism. Semi-volatiles, which include phthalates, have been observed in birds to produce abnormalities in body weight and egg production. Phenols appear to affect water-dwelling animals in the reproductive and juvenile stages.

The results of the Ecological Risk Assessment indicate that the environment surrounding the site could be affected by:

In January 1995, EPA completed a Baseline Human Health Risk Assessment for OU1. Based on the results of the RI, the primary contaminants associated with potential human health risk at the site include:

Exposure to benzene affects the blood, bone marrow, central nervous system, respiratory system, eyes, and skin. Exposure to 1,2-dichloroethane acts on the central nervous system, digestive system, and respiratory system. In animals, 1,1,2-trichloroethane appears to affect the central nervous system, liver, kidneys, and the digestive system. The target organs affected by the PAHs benzo(a)pyrene and dibenz(a,h)anthracene include lungs, liver, kidneys, and skin. Exposure to phenols affects the skin, liver, kidneys, central nervous system, and respiratory system. Pesticides generally act on the respiratory system, central nervous system, and the circulatory system. The target organs affected by exposure to manganese include the central nervous system, respiratory system, blood, and kidneys. Exposure to beryllium affects the lungs, skin, eyes, and mucus membranes. The target organs affected by exposure to arsenic include the liver, kidneys, skin, and lungs. Exposure to mercury affects the central nervous system, kidneys, eyes, and skin.

The results of the Baseline Human Health Risk Assessment indicated that contamination at the site would present a risk above EPA's acceptable level to the following populations:

Based on the results of the RI Report, the Ecological Risk Assessment, and the Human Health Risk Assessment, Neville Land Company completed a Feasibility Study for OU1 in April 1995. The FS described clean-up objectives and compared possible clean-up alternatives for the site.

In April 1996, EPA presented an initial Proposed Plan for OU1 which evaluated four alternatives to address the site contamination. The initial Proposed Plan considered clean-up remedies for the soil, waste materials, ground water, surface water, and sediments. In response to concerns raised before and during the public comment period, EPA decided to issue a ROD to focus only on the soil and buried waste at the site. EPA will address the contamination found in the ground water, surface water, and sediments as OU3.

EPA issued a ROD for OU1 on September 27, 1996, which presented the clean-up plans for the buried waste and contaminated soil at the site. The remedy consisted of:

Operable Unit Three

During the public comment period on the initial Proposed Plan for OU1, EPA raised concerns regarding the potential for the ground water contaminants beneath the site to travel towards the Coraopolis Borough water supply wells located 750 feet southwest from the western boundary of the site. In general, ground water beneath the site flows from the center of the site towards either the Main or Back Channel of the Ohio River. Although ground water from the site most likely discharges to the river adjacent to the shore, preliminary modeling performed during the RI indicated that a small percentage (approximately 2%) may flow beneath the river from the site and could potentially reach the Coraopolis supply wells.

In response to these concerns, EPA decided to issue a ROD for OU1 to focus only on the soil and buried waste at the site and allow Neville Land Company to perform additional ground water studies to fully evaluate the potential for contaminated ground water flow from beneath the site towards the Coraopolis supply wells. Neville Land Company also wants to determine the extent to which natural processes are containing and reducing the size of the contaminated ground water plume beneath the southeastern portion of the size. After completion of these additional studies, EPA will issue a ROD for OU3 identifying the appropriate clean-up requirements for the ground water, surface water, and sediments.

Next Steps

As the next step in the Superfund clean-up process, EPA and Neville Land Company will enter into negotiations about the performance of the remedial design and remedial action for OU1. Once EPA reaches a settlement with Neville Land Company, EPA must publish a notice in the Federal Register, a daily publication of congressional legislation, at least 30 days before the agreement becomes final. This notice will state the name of the facility and the parties to the proposed agreement. Interested parties will have an opportunity to file written comments on the settlement for a period of 30 days.

Section 3.0: Community Background

Section 3.1: Community Profile

Neville Township is a 1.62-square-mile residential and industrial community on Neville Island, which lies in the Ohio River. The physical isolation of township residents from other surrounding communities makes the township an independent and close-knit community. Although the township has its own fire and police force, it relies on the Borough of Coraopolis for other services such as its school system, the Cornell School District.

Recent statistics show that the residential population of Neville Township is 1,273. The population of Neville Township has decreased approximately 50 percent over the last 35 years. However, one resident commented that it appears a younger generation of individuals and families are moving into the community.

Judging from the individuals interviewed for this CRP, many citizens have been life-time residents in the community. The township's small population has meant that local officials know, and are known by, most of the area's residents. A significant number of senior citizens live in the township.

Section 3.2: History of Community Involvement

Historically, public concern in and involvement with the Ohio River Park Superfund Site has been minimal. However, beginning in February 1988, when Allegheny County imposed restrictions on the use of the Coraopolis Bridge in winter, the Neville Island residents became active with respect to the bridge replacement and OU2 activities. At this time, a group of residents established the "Neville Island Bridge Committee." The committee's primary goal was to obtain a replacement bridge as soon as possible. The committee held bimonthly meetings and published newsletters and public announcements. Interested citizens attended the meetings, along with representatives of PADER, Allegheny County, the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation, EPA, and other public agencies. Allegheny County continually updated the public on the status of the bridge replacement project.

On January 15, 1993, EPA issued a Proposed Plan that addressed the OU2 soil contamination. EPA made the Proposed Plan, RI Report, and other site-related documents available to the public by placing copies in the Administrative Record File located at the information repositories for the site.

EPA published an announcement of a public meeting, comment period, and the availability of the Administrative Record File in the Allegheny Times and the Coraopolis Record on January 15, 1993. EPA began a 30-day public comment period on January 15, 1993, and concluded it on February 15, 1993.

On January 25, 1993, EPA conducted a briefing for Federal, state, county, and local elected officials on the Proposed Plan for OU2. EPA also held a public meeting at the Neville Township Municipal Building on Neville Island. At the meeting, EPA representatives answered questions about the site and the clean-up alternatives under consideration. Approximately 80 people attended the meeting, including local residents, government officials, and representatives from PADER, the Neville Island Bridge Committee, and the local media. EPA opened the session with an overview of the Superfund program and the events leading up to the Proposed Plan. EPA also discussed opportunities for public involvement. The meeting closed with a question-and-answer session. Concerned citizens presented the following issues:

EPA issued a ROD for OU2 on March 31, 1993, that stated no remedial action was required. At this time, EPA published a notice announcing the ROD and its availability to concerned citizens in the area's major local newspapers.

On April 2, 1996, EPA released the RI/FS Report and the Proposed Plan for OU1 to the public. EPA issued a Proposed Plan Fact Sheet in April 1996, providing residents with a summary of the RI Report results and clean-up alternatives for the site, the clean-up remedy for addressing contamination at the site, and the opportunity for community involvement by commenting on the Proposed Plan. The fact sheet also announced the public comment period and upcoming public meeting. EPA mailed the fact sheet to concerned citizens and placed copies in the Neville Township Municipal Building and the information repository.

EPA published a public notice announcing a public comment period, a public meeting date, and the availability of the Proposed Plan and RI/FS Report. The notice appeared in the Tribune Review on April 2, 1996, in the Coraopolis Record on April 3, 1996, and in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette on April 4, 1996. A 30-day public comment period began on April 2, 1996, and was initially scheduled to conclude on May 1, 1996. By request, EPA extended the public comment period until June 1, 1996.

On April 15, 1996, EPA conducted a briefing for the Board of County Supervisors and local elected officials. EPA also held a public meeting at the Cornell Educational Center, a local high school located in Coraopolis. At the meeting, EPA representatives answered questions about the site and the clean-up alternatives under consideration. Approximately 40 people attended the meeting, including residents from the impacted area, local government officials, and news media representatives. EPA opened the session with an overview of the Superfund process and the RI/FS activities conducted at the site, and described the clean-up remedy for OU1. The meeting closed with a question and answer session. Some of the issues presented by concerned citizens included:

In October 1996, EPA began developing this CRP by conducting interviews with residents of Neville Township and Coraopolis Borough, local elected officials, the local media and a local citizen's group. EPA talked with concerned citizens about their issues and concerns with the site, the types of information they want to receive, and how EPA can meet these information needs most effectively. The following section, Summary of Community Concerns for the Site, provides an overview of the comments and questions EPA received during the community interviews.

Section 3.3: Summary of Community Concerns for the Site

At present, community concern about contamination at the Ohio River Park Superfund Site is moderate, for three main reasons:

EPA held its most recent public meeting in April 1996, to discuss the clean-up remedy for the contaminated soil and buried wastes. Although fewer citizens attended the public meeting in April 1996, than in the past, the community is still interested in the site and has expressed a variety of issues and concerns to EPA and the local officials throughout the past year.

EPA conducted personal interviews with citizens of Neville Island and Coraopolis, local government officials, a media representative, and other interested parties on October 16 and 17, 1996. The interviews helped EPA to:

The community's major concerns and questions regarding the Ohio River Park Superfund Site include:

During the interviews, EPA determined the types of information the community wants to receive and how EPA could best provide the desired information. Following the interviews, EPA analyzed the information provided by the community, reviewed supplemental site files, and prepared the CRP for the Ohio River Park Superfund Site. The major concerns and questions raised by interested parties during the interviews are presented below. The Community Relations Program EPA developed in response is presented in Section 4.0.

The Need for the Clean-Up Remedy

Opinions regarding the need for clean-up at the site were varied. Some residents questioned the necessity of the cleanup at all, given that the contamination has been present at the site for a long time. These residents believe the contamination has not affected ground water or the aquifer to date and will not in the future. These residents also observe vegetation on and around the site and interpret the growth as a bill of clean health for the environment. Others wanted to know why it has taken EPA so long to do something, again, noting the duration of the contamination. A few citizens wanted to know the evaluation criteria for selecting the clean-up remedy.

The Effectiveness of the Clean-Up Remedy

The community is concerned about the integrity of the cap during flood conditions. The residents worry about the risk of further contamination should contaminants enter the aquifer and, eventually, infiltrate adjacent water supplies.

Implementation of the Clean-Up Remedy

The public expressed some scepticism that the responsible party will not implement the clean-up remedy properly and is generally concerned about EPA's oversight role. Others are concerned about proper closure of an abandoned oil well at the site.

The Possible Contamination of the Coraopolis Water Supply

Some citizens worry that the Coraopolis water supply may become contaminated by the site. If this occurs, these citizens worry that insufficient water reserves would be available from adjacent communities to meet Coraopolis' water needs. Therefore, these individuals would prefer that EPA remove the waste, rather than use a cap.

The Future Use of the Site

Almost everyone EPA interviewed had suggestions for the future use of the site. Local officials stated a preference to use the site property for light commercial or retail use, such as a mini-mall or marina. In addition, local officials would like to see if areas without contamination could be used for residential use or a township building. Neville Township also is concerned that a current ground water study to investigate contamination of the Coraopolis water well supply may impact future site use.

Members of Neville Green, an organization whose purpose is to beautify the island, stated a strong desire to continue its work to beautify the site. The organization reiterated its position to maintain the site as a park. Some residents suggested recreational fields for soccer and baseball and opposed the idea of a warehouse.

The Effect of Contamination on Human Health, Wildlife, and the Environment

One resident of Neville Island expressed strong concerns about human health as it relates to the site contamination. She cited numerous instances of serious illness in her family and her neighbors' families, all of whom live next to or adjacent to the site. The public wants assurances from EPA that the clean-up activities will be conducted according to appropriate health and safety standards to minimize risks to the public.

Another community member is concerned about the migration of sick animals from the site and the possible impact on public health in Neville Township should the displaced animals multiply in the neighborhood or elsewhere.

Property Values

Residents of Neville Island are concerned about their property values as a result of owning houses adjacent to a Superfund site. The residents believe that publicity on the site places them in a Catch-22. While the citizens want to be well informed, they anticipate difficulty selling their properties due to public knowledge of the contamination. Additionally, residents tend not to discuss site matters in an effort to minimize the further spreading of information about the site contamination.

EPA has found that although owning property adjacent to a hazardous waste site is not desirable to those living or working nearby, once the hazardous waste sites are cleaned up, property values should return to normal.

The Accessibility of Public Information through Local Media, Repositories, and Meetings

Many residents of Neville Island are concerned about the remote locations of the information repository and meeting places. The residents do not want to travel to Coraopolis to get information about the site. Specific suggestions included relocating the Administrative Record File to Neville Island, perhaps at the municipal building, and establishment of a meeting place on Neville Island, particularly to accommodate elder residents who may not drive.

Residents also are concerned about being kept informed of site news through the use of local media. Specifically, residents suggested that EPA place notices in the Coraopolis Record and the Star.

The Need to Simplify Information

Several community members requested that EPA provide information that is understandable to all citizens, eliminating technical jargon and using simpler terms. The community requested that EPA send out brief fact sheets on a regular basis, perhaps twice a year. However, residents do not want to be bombarded with lots of material and lengthy reports.

Section 4.0: EPA's Community Relations Program

Section 4.1: The Goals of EPA's Community Relations Program

EPA designed this Community Relations Plan for the Ohio River Park Superfund Site to promote two-way communication between citizens and the Agency. EPA's decision-making ability is enhanced by actively soliciting comments and information from the public. This Community Relations Plan is responsive to the following goals:

Establish and maintain effective communication between EPA and the community surrounding the Ohio River Park Superfund Site.

EPA has established and will continue to maintain effective communication through its community relations activities. EPA will draw on its full range of community involvement tools, including meetings, fact sheets, and public announcements, to facilitate communication about the Ohio River Park Superfund Site.

Provide information about site-related activities and issues to concerned citizens and government officials to increase their awareness and understanding of the Ohio River Park Superfund Site.

EPA has and will continue to provide information to concerned citizens and Federal, state, and local officials. Some of the ways EPA will do this include fact sheets, activities updates, newsletters, information sessions, public meetings, public notices, news releases, and the Community Relations Plan. EPA will use these various communication tools to explain site clean-up activities and how these activities fit into the Superfund process. EPA will be committed to providing information about site-related activities in a timely, accurate, and consistent manner.

Foster community participation in the Superfund activities at the Ohio River Park Superfund Site.

EPA has and will continue to encourage community participation in the Superfund activities at the site by establishing effective communication with the public. EPA's on-going community relations efforts will encourage residents to contribute to Agency decisions that have a long-term impact on their community.

Section 4.2: EPA's Community Relations Activities for the Site

To achieve its community relations objectives effectively and efficiently, EPA recommends the following 14 community relations activities for the Ohio River Park Superfund Site. EPA will conduct these activities throughout the Superfund process to ensure that the community is informed of site activities and developments and to ensure that the public has sufficient time to express its concerns. These activities are summarized in Table 1.

Activity 1: Designate an EPA Community Involvement Coordinator for the Site
Objective:
To ensure prompt, accurate, and consistent information and responses about the Ohio River Park Superfund Site.
Method:
Patrick Gaughan is the Community Involvement Coordinator for the Ohio River Park Superfund Site. Mr. Gaughan has established and will maintain communications with concerned citizens and Federal, state, and local officials, implement EPA's community relations activities, and be available to the public via telephone. He will work closely with Romuald Roman, EPA's Remedial Project Manager, and other government representatives working at the site. (See Appendix A for information on contacting Patrick Gaughan or Romuald Roman).
Activity 2: Respond Promptly and Accurately to Inquiries from Residents, Public Officials, Community Groups, and the Media
Objective:
To maintain two-way communication between EPA and the site community.
Method:
EPA will continue to use meetings and printed material to respond to public concerns and inquiries, and also will continue to use the Community Involvement Coordinator to provide personal responses. The Coordinator will respond to all inquiries promptly and will be accessible to the public by telephone.
Activity 3: Notify the Community of Site Activities on a Regular Basis
Objective:
To provide the public with information about site activities, thereby minimizing concerns about activities and possible disruptions to the community.
Method:
EPA has and will continue to disseminate information to the public through various tools, including fact sheets, activities updates, information sessions, public meetings, and public notices. EPA will place selected information about the site on the internet.

In the case of an emergency, EPA, in cooperation with other agencies, reserves the right to notify residents in the most expeditious manner should a release of contaminants occur, or related instance, to the atmosphere while the site is undergoing remediation. Notification would take place in the form of radio or television broadcasts, door-to-door notification by EPA and/or contractor personnel at the site, use of local authorities such as police/fire department notification through the use of loud speakers, etc. Such type of notification is available and used only very rarely.

Activity 4: Notify Public Officials of Site Activities on a Regular Basis
Objective:
To provide public officials with information about site activities so they are informed and can respond to community concerns.
Method:
EPA has and will continue to disseminate information to public officials through various tools, including fact sheets, activities updates, information sessions, public meetings and public notices. EPA also will conduct personal visits, when appropriate. EPA will notify the Neville Township Board of Commissioners, Coraopolis Borough officials, state representatives and senators, and U.S. Congressmen and Senators of site activities.
Activity 5: Update Community Relations Plan
Objective:
To reflect changes in the level and nature of community concern and changes in EPA's enforcement efforts.
Method:
The Community Relations Plan will be revised as required by public concern. The revision of the Plan will include: updated information about the site and the community to reflect changes since EPA issued the original Plan; assessment of the Community Relations Program to date; and plans for future community relations activities.
Activity 6: Prepare and Distribute Fact Sheets and Technical Summaries
Objective:
To provide the public with information on the status and findings of clean-up activities in an effort to ensure that residents have up-to-date and easy-to-understand information on the issues associated with the cleanup.
Method:
Fact sheets and activities updates will be mailed to all parties on the site mailing list. Copies will be placed at the Neville Township Municipal Building, and a copy will be available at the information repository, located at the Coraopolis Memorial Library. Fact sheets will be distributed when new information about site activities is available or when EPA needs to announce a public meeting or other EPA-sponsored activity.
Activity 7: Publish Public Notices
Objective:
To inform the community of key site developments, public meetings, and the release of site documents.
Method:
EPA will publish notices in the Coraopolis Record, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, and the Tribune Review. These notices will include relevant dates, times, and locations of meetings or activities, as well as the name, address, and phone number of the primary contact person. Public notices regarding site-specific documents, such as a Record of Decision, will briefly summarize the document.
Activity 8: Conduct Public Meetings or Availability Sessions
Objective:
To provide a forum for EPA to explain the Superfund process, describe clean-up technologies, share information on site-related activities, and request input from the community.
Method:
EPA has and will continue to hold informal meetings and workshops as warranted by site activities or requested by the community. These meetings and workshops will be held in the community and will be facilitated by the Community Involvement Coordinator, as well as attended by other EPA staff. These meetings and workshops currently are held at the Cornell Educational Center in Coraopolis. However, residents have requested that the meeting location be moved to a facility located on Neville Island. EPA currently is looking into this. (See Appendix B for public meeting locations.)
Activity 9: Hold a Public Comment Period Following Release of the Proposed Plan
Objective:
To request public input on EPA's recommended course of proposed actions to remedy the contamination associated with Ohio River Park Superfund Site.
Method:
EPA will hold a public comment period for a minimum of 30 days following the release of the Proposed Plan, which will present the various clean-up options for the site. EPA will notify residents when the public comment period begins and ends.
Activity 10: Prepare a Transcript of the Public Meeting on the Proposed Plan
Objective:
To document and provide a public record of the proceedings of the public meeting.
Method:
EPA has and will continue to use a local stenographer to transcribe a word-for-word record of the public meeting on the Proposed Plan. EPA will place a copy of the transcript in the Administrative Record File, available at the information repository. (See Appendix B for information repository locations.)
Activity 11: Prepare a Responsiveness Summary
Objective:
To document and summarize community input received by EPA during the public comment period.
Method:
EPA will prepare a Responsiveness Summary that presents the comments and questions EPA receives on the Proposed Plan and EPA's responses. EPA will include the Responsiveness Summary as part of its Record of Decision, which presents EPA's final plan for clean-up activities.
Activity 12: Maintain and Update Site Mailing List
Objective:
To mail fact sheets and other EPA materials to residents and to contact residents about other community involvement activities.
Method:
EPA will continue to maintain an up-to-date listing of Federal, state, and local officials; local media; community groups; and other interested parties, including residents. EPA obtains a residential listing from local tax records, public meeting sign-in sheets, and other listings. EPA holds the residential mailing list confidential and does not release any address information.
Activity 13: Establish and Update Information Repository
Objective:
To provide the public with easy access to information on the Ohio River Park Superfund Site.
Method:
EPA established the Coraopolis Memorial Library as the information repository for the Ohio River Park Superfund Site. However, island residents have expressed an interest in having copies of the site file located on Neville Island. EPA currently is exploring the Neville Township Municipal Building as a possible information repository on Neville Island. EPA will place site-related documents in the Administrative Record File at the information repository as the documents are released. (See Appendix B for information repository locations.)
Activity 14: Maintain a World Wide Web Site
Objective:
To facilitate public access to information about the Ohio River Park Superfund Site.
Method:
EPA will place copies of selected documents related to the site on the Agency's World Wide Web (WWW) Site on the internet. The WWW Site houses information for all ten EPA regions. To access the EPA Region III page:
1. EPA's address is http://www.epa.gov.
2. Click on Region in the Office, Region, and Laboratories menu item.
3. Select Region 3 on the map or from the listing.
4. Select Hazardous Site Cleanup Division from the next menu listing.
5. Click on the NPL Sites button to view a listing of Superfund sites and their contacts.
6. Information is available for all sites printed in color.

Table 1 outlines the designated activities for the site and the timeframe in which each activity may occur.

Table 1: Summary of Community Relations Activities

ACTIVITY AND TIME FRAME

Activity Time Frame

1. Designate an EPA Community Involvement Coordinator for the Site

An EPA Community Involvement Coordinator has been designated for the site.

2. Respond Promptly and Accurately to Inquiries from Residents, Public Officials, Community Groups, and the Media

EPA will promptly respond to inquiries throughout the duration of the project.

3. Notify the Community of Site Activities on a Regular Basis

EPA will notify the community of site activities on a regular basis as site activities warrant.

4. Notify Public Officials of Site Activities on a Regular Basis

EPA will notify public officials of site activities on a regular basis as site activities warrant.

5. Update Community Relations Plan

EPA will update the Community Relations Plan as required by public concern.

6. Prepare and Distribute Fact Sheets and Technical Summaries

EPA will prepare facts sheets and technical summaries as site activities warrant.

7. Publish Public Notices

EPA will publish public notices at milestones as site activities warrant.

8. Conduct Public Meetings or Availability Sessions

EPA will conduct public meetings and availability sessions as site activities warrant.

9. Hold a Public Comment Period Following Release of the Proposed Plan

EPA will hold a public comment period following the release of the Proposed Plan for OU3.

10. Prepare a Transcript of the Public Meeting on the Proposed Plan

EPA will prepare a transcript of the public meeting on the Proposed Plan for OU3.

11. Prepare a Responsiveness Summary

EPA will prepare a responsiveness summary following the public comment period on the Proposed Plan.

12. Maintain and Update Site Mailing List

EPA established a mailing list for the site. EPA will update the list periodically.

13. Establish and Update Information Repository

EPA established an information repository at the Coraopolis Memorial Library. EPA will update the information repository as site activities warrant.

14. Maintain a World Wide Web (WWW) Site

EPA will update the WWW Site as site documents become available.

Appendix A: Interested Parties and Contact List

1. Federal Agency Officials

Patrick Gaughan (3HW43)
Community Involvement Coordinator
U.S. EPA, Region III
11th & Chapline Streets
Wheeling, WV 26003
(304) 234-0238
Fax: (304) 234-0282/0259

Romuald Roman (3HW22)
Remedial Project Manager
U.S. EPA, Region III
1650 Arch Street
Philadelphia, PA 19103-2029
(215) 814-3212
Fax: (215) 814-3001
email: roman.rom@epa.gov

2. State Agency Officials

Annette Paluh
Project Officer
PA Department of Environmental Protection (PADEP)
400 Waterfront Drive
Pittsburgh, PA 15222
(412) 442-4000
Fax: (412) 442-4194

James Schack
Hazardous Site Section Chief of the Environmental Clean-up Program
PADEP
400 Waterfront Drive
Pittsburgh, PA 15222
(412) 442-4000
Fax: (412) 442-4194

3. Federal Elected Officials

U.S. Senator Arlen Spector
530 Hart Senate Office Building
Washington, DC 20510
(202) 224-4254
Fax: (202) 228-1229

Federal Building, Suite
2031 Liberty Avenue and Grant Street
Pittsburgh, PA 15222
(412) 644-3400
Fax: (412) 244-4871

U.S. Senator Richard Santorum
120 Russell Senate Office Building
Washington, DC 20510
(202) 224-6324
Fax: (202) 228-0604

The Landmarks Building
One Station Square, Suite 250
Pittsburgh, PA 15219
(412) 562-0533
Fax: (412) 562-4313

U.S. Congressman William Coyne
2455 Rayburn Building
Washington, DC 20510
(202) 225-2301
Fax: (202) 225-1844

2009 Federal Building
1000 Liberty Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15222
(412) 644-2870
Fax: (412) 644-3434

4. State Elected Officials

Governor Thomas J. Ridge, Jr.
Main Capitol Building Room
225 Harrisburg, PA 17120
(800) 932-0784
(717) 787-2500
Fax: (717) 772-8284

Lt. Governor Mark S. Schweiker
Main Capitol Building
Room 200
Harrisburg, PA 17120
(717) 787-3300
Fax: (717) 783-0150

Senator Jack Wagner
Main Capitol Building
Room 101
Harrisburg, PA 17120
(717) 787-5300
Fax: (717) 772-5484

1789 Pinehollow Road
McKees Rocks, PA 15136-1575
(412) 442-5836
Fax: (412) 442-5839

Representative David J. Mayernick
House of Representatives
P.O. Box 202020
Harrisburg, PA 17120-2020
(717) 783-1654
Fax: (717) 772-6956

29th Legislative District
440 Perry Highway
Pittsburgh, PA 15229
(412) 931-2295
No Fax available

5. Allegheny County Officials

Larry Dunn, Chairman
Allegheny County Board of Commissioners
119 Allegheny County Court House
463 Grant Street
Pittsburgh, PA 15219
(412) 350-5301
Fax: (412) 350-7356

Michael Dawida, Commissioner
Allegheny County Board of Commissioners
119 Allegheny County Court House
463 Grant Street
Pittsburgh, PA 15219
(412) 350-5303
Fax: (412) 350-4939

Robert Cranmer, Commissioner
Allegheny County Board of Commissioners
119 Allegheny County Court House
463 Grant Street
Pittsburgh, PA 15219
(412) 350-5302
Fax: (412) 350-7359

Dr. Bruce Dixon, Director
Allegheny County Health Department
3333 Forbes Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15213-3120
(412) 687-2243
Fax: (412) 578-8325

6. Local Officials

Neville Township Board of Commissioners
William Nickles, Chairman
Joseph Gottlieb, Vice-Chairman
James Hanson
Walter Kohut
Robert Tafelski, Jr.

Neville Township Municipal Building
5050 Grand Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15225
(412) 264-1977
Fax: (412) 264-8906

Neville Township Planning Commission
William Leon
Neville Township Municipal Building
5050 Grand Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15225
(412) 264-1977
Fax: (412) 264-8906

Mayor Orlando Falcione
Borough of Coraopolis
Municipal Building
1012 Fifth Avenue
Coraopolis, PA 15108
(412) 264-3002
Fax: (412) 264-6951

Borough Council
Borough of Coraopolis
Mary Sike, President
Gerald Thompson, Vice-President
Robert Barone
Richard Fenton
Shelly Jones
Terry Kirkpatrick
Robert McCafferty
Charles White

Municipal Building
1012 Fifth Avenue
Coraopolis, PA 15108
(412) 264-3002
Fax: (412) 264-6951

7. Other Interested Parties

Neville Green
c/o Mr. and Mrs. Harry Hutchinson
7005 River Road
Pittsburgh, PA 15225
(412) 262-4742
No Fax available

8. Local Media

Newspapers

Allegheny Times
894 Beaver Grade Road
Moon Township, PA 15108
(412) 269-1144
Fax: (412) 269-1151
Advertising Representative: Ralph Bonnar
Editor: Sandra Donovan

Coraopolis Record
c/o Gateway Publications
705 Fifth Avenue
Coraopolis, PA 15108
(412) 264-4140
Fax: (412) 264-8269
Advertising Representative: Bob LaViere
Editor: Harry Funk

Tribune Review
Cabin Hill Drive
Greensburgh, PA 15601
(412) 838-5129
Fax: (412) 838-5171 (Greensburgh Office)
Fax: (412) 391-2152/2170 (Pittsburgh Office)
Advertising Representative: Tim Turko
News Editors: Frank Myers Susan McFarland

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
34 Boulevard of the Allies
Pittsburgh, PA 15222
(412) 263-1601
Fax: (412) 391-4630
Advertising Representative: Charlene White
Editor: John Craig

Radio Stations

KDKA Radio
One Gateway Center
Pittsburgh, PA 15222
(412) 575-2245
Fax: (412) 575-2871
News/Public Service Director: Sue McInerney

WEDO Radio
414 Fifth Avenue
McKeesport, PA 15132
(412) 664-4431
No Fax available
Program/Public Service Director: Bill Korch

WWSW Radio
One Allegheny Square Suite 800
Pittsburgh, PA 15212
(412) 231-8560
Fax: (412) 323-5313
News/Public Service Director: Rose Douglas

WDVE-WXDX Radio
200 Fleet Street
Pittsburgh, PA 15220
(412) 937-1441 (ext. 239)
Fax: (412) 937-1207
News/Public Service Director: Chris Winter

KQV Radio
650 Center City Tower
Pittsburgh, PA 15222
(412) 562-5960
Fax: (412) 562-5903
News Director: Frank Gottlieb
Public Service Director: Eric Selby

WAMO Radio
960 Penn Avenue Suite 200
Pittsburgh, PA 15222
(412) 471-2181
Fax: (412) 456-4040
News Director: Tene Croom
Public Service Director: Pan Greer

WDSY-WJJJ Radio
320 Fort Duquesne Boulevard Suite 300
Pittsburgh, PA 15222
(412) 471-9950
Fax: (412) 765-3610
News/Public Service Director: Ellen Gamble

WTAE Radio
400 Ardmore Boulevard
Pittsburgh, PA 15221
(412) 244-4550
Fax: (412) 244-4596
News Director: Joe DeStio
Public Service Director: Elaine Miller

Television Stations

KDKA TV - Channel 2
One Gateway Center
Pittsburgh, PA 15222
(412) 882-2222
Fax: (412) 575-2871
News Director: Sue McInerney
Public Service Director: Jenny Ziders

WTAE TV - Channel 4
400 Ardmore Boulevard
Pittsburgh, PA 15221
(412) 244-4460
Fax: (412) 244-4628
News Director: Tom Petner
Public Service Director: Kirk Szesny

WPXI TV - Channel 11
11 Television Hill
Pittsburgh, PA 15214
(800) 237-9794
(412) 237-4901
Fax: (412) 237-4900
News Director: Tracye Fox
Public Service Director: Robin Beckham

WPGH TV - Channel 53
750 Ivory Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15214
(412) 931-5300
Fax: (412) 931-4284
News Director: Dave Janecek

Appendix B: Information Repositories and Public Meeting Locations

1. Information Repositories

Coraopolis Memorial Library
State and School Streets
Coraopolis, PA 15108
(412) 264-3502
Contact: Christine Rice
Hours:
Monday through Thursday
10:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m.
Friday and Saturday
10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
Administrative Record Room
1650 Arch St
Philadelphia, PA 19103-2029
(215) 814-3157
Contact: Anna Butch
Hours:
Monday through Friday
8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

2. Public Meeting Locations

Cornell Educational Center
1099 Maple Avenue
Coraopolis, PA 15108
(412) 264-5010
Meeting Coordinator: Edie Spartara

Appendix C: Technical Assistance Grant (TAG) Information

EPA provides Technical Assistance Grants (TAGs) of up to $50,000 as part of its Superfund community relations program. The TAG program enables citizens residing near a site to hire a technical expert to review and interpret site reports generated by EPA or other parties. Citizens can find complete information about TAGs in an EPA document entitled The Citizen's Guidance Manual for the Technical Assistance Grant Program. This document is available through the EPA Region III Office. For information on how to apply for a Technical Assistance Grant, or to request a copy of the guidance manual, contact:

Patrick Gaughan (3HW43)
Community Involvement Coordinator
U.S. EPA, Region III
11th and Chapline Streets
Wheeling, WV 26003
(304) 234-0238

The Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) requires that EPA accept all applications submitted for TAGs. Only one group per site can receive a TAG, so EPA urges local residents and groups to join together to apply.

The following are Federal publications on the TAG program that citizens can obtain by calling EPA's toll-free publications number: 1-800-553-6847.

Appendix D: About EPA

The Superfund Program

The Superfund Program is one of the nation's most ambitious and complex environmental programs. Congress created Superfund in 1980 when it passed the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) and subsequently amended the Act in 1986 by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA). CERCLA arose out of the need to protect people from the dangers posed by abandoned or uncontrolled hazardous waste sites. CERCLA gave the Federal government the authority to respond to hazardous substance emergencies and to develop long-term solutions for the nation's most serious hazardous waste problems.

The term "Superfund" refers to a $1.6 billion trust fund established by Congress to pay for clean-up and enforcement activities at hazardous waste sites. An assessment on petroleum and chemical industries finances Superfund. Superfund gives EPA the authority to stop on-going releases or prevent potential releases of hazardous substances; enables EPA to make the parties responsible for contaminating a site pay for its cleanup; and provides funding for the cleanup when money from responsible parties is not available.

The National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan, or National Contingency Plan (NCP), guides the Superfund program. This plan outlines the steps that EPA and other Federal agencies must follow when responding to releases of hazardous substances into the environment. There are two ways EPA can respond to hazardous substances releases - removal actions and remedial actions.

Identifying Sites for Cleanup

Under the Superfund program, EPA investigates numerous hazardous waste sites throughout the United States. Upon discovery, EPA conducts an initial review of each site known as a Preliminary Assessment/Site Inspection (PA/SI). EPA uses the PA/SIs to determine whether further action at a site is necessary. EPA then evaluates the site by using the Hazard Ranking System (HRS). The HRS is a mathematical measurement tool which assigns each site a score based on the possibility that contamination will spread through ground water, surface water, or air. It also takes into account other factors, such as the location of nearby residences. EPA places sites scoring over 28.5 on the National Priorities List (NPL). The NPL is EPA's list of the nation's most serious hazardous waste sites that are eligible for money for cleanup from Superfund.

Selecting and Implementing the Clean-up Plan

After EPA places a site on the NPL, the Agency conducts a Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study (RI/FS). The RI examines the nature and extent of contamination at a site and the potential associated health and environmental risks. The FS analyzes the different clean-up plans that EPA could use at a site. EPA then announces its preferred clean-up method, or remedy, in a document called a Proposed Remedial Action Plan (Proposed Plan). EPA then announces a 30-day public comment period for the Proposed Plan. During this time, EPA holds a public meeting to provide information and address the community's questions about the Proposed Plan. EPA takes all comments into account and may change its recommended clean-up method based on citizen input. After reviewing all public comments, EPA makes a final decision and selects a clean-up method.

This selection is announced in a document called the Record of Decision (ROD). The ROD is EPA's official report that documents the background information on the site, describes the chosen clean-up plan, outlines the clean-up plan selection process, and summarizes all public concerns and comments.

The next step is the Remedial Design and Remedial Action (RD/RA), during which EPA supervises the design and implementation of the clean-up plan outlined in the ROD. When necessary, EPA can modify the ROD to reflect minor changes to the clean-up plan. During the Remedial Design, EPA prepares the technical plans and specifications for implementing the chosen clean-up plan. During the Remedial Action, EPA or the Potentially Responsible Parties conduct the construction or other work necessary to implement the clean-up plan.

After EPA or the Potentially Responsible Parties complete the remedial design and remedial action work at a site, the Agency continues to monitor the site during the final stage of cleanup with the Operation & Maintenance (O&M) phase to ensure that the clean-up levels are being achieved at the site. After EPA has determined that all appropriate clean-up actions have been completed at the site, the Agency will delete that site from the NPL.

Relevant EPA Groups

Headquartered in Washington, D.C., EPA has ten regional offices, each of which has community relations and technical staff involved in Superfund site cleanups. EPA Region III encompasses Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, West Virginia, and Washington, D.C. The EPA Region III office is located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. It houses several divisions, branches, and sections that work on a number of hazardous waste sites. The EPA branches most involved with the Ohio River Park Superfund Site are described below.

Superfund Community Involvement Section (Region III)

This section oversees communication between EPA and all residents, public officials, media representatives, and community groups interested in Superfund sites. The Superfund Community Involvement Section is responsible for planning, coordinating, and implementing activities to enhance communication and community involvement for each site. Each site is assigned a Community Involvement Coordinator (CIC) who works closely with EPA technical staff to keep to local community informed and involved during Superfund clean-up work. The CIC for the Ohio River Park Superfund Site is Patrick Gaughan. Please refer to Appendix A for his address and telephone number.

Superfund General Remedial Branch (Region III)

This branch is responsible for all long-term clean-up work at Superfund sites. EPA remedial personnel are responsible for: conducting site assessments; remedial investigations; feasibility studies; treatability tests; and other clean-up activities. Each site is assigned a Remedial Project Manager (RPM), who supervises the work performed by EPA technical staff, private contractors, and other parties involved in site study and clean-up actions. The RPM for the Ohio River Park Superfund Site is Romuald Roman. Please refer to Appendix A for his address and telephone number.

Superfund Removal Branch (Region III)

EPA's Superfund Removal Branch manages short-term actions and emergency removal responses. These actions include responses to accidental releases of hazardous substances, as well as short-term work at sites on the NPL. Immediate removal actions are supervised by EPA On-Scene Coordinators (OSCs). Currently, there are no removal activities occurring at the site.

Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (PADEP)

The Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (formerly known as the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Resources - PADER) is the state agency that supports EPA-led activities at Superfund sites in Pennsylvania. PADEP reviews and comments on site work and studies, participates in community involvement activities, and provides technical assistance to EPA. Please refer to Appendix A for information about the PADEP representatives involved with the Ohio River Park Superfund Site.

Appendix E: Glossary and Acronyms

Administrative Order on Consent
Legal agreement between EPA and potentially responsible parties (PRPs) in which PRPs agree to perform or pay for the cost of a site cleanup. The agreement describes actions to be taken at the site and may be subject to a public comment period.
Administrative Record File
Collection of all information used by EPA in selecting a clean-up plan for a site.
Arsenic
A naturally occurring metal. The primary use of arsenic includes pesticides and wood preservatives.
Benzene Hexachloride (BHC)
A pesticide used to destroy or inhibit the actions of animal pests.
Bitumen
A coal coking process waste. Bitumen is used in adhesives, coatings, paints, sealants, and roofing and road coatings. Bitumens are found in lower grades of coal.
Cleanup
Actions taken to deal with a release or threatened release of hazardous substances that could affect public health and/or the environment. The term "cleanup" is often used broadly to describe various Superfund response actions, such as removal action or a remedial action.
Community Relations Plan (CRP)
Document that outlines community concerns about and expectations for the remediation of a site identified during community interviews. Also provides a detailed description of community relations activities selected to address those concerns.
Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA)
Law providing the U.S. Environment Protection Agency with broad authority to pursue liability, compensation, cleanup, and emergency response for hazardous substances released into the environment, and for the cleanup of inactive hazardous waste disposal sites. Also known as Superfund.
Feasibility Study (FS)
Part of a two-phase field study called a remedial investigation/feasibility study. The purpose of the FS phase is to identify and screen alternative methods of remediating a site and to analyze in detail the technology and costs of the alternative methods.
Hazard Ranking System (HRS)
the method used by EPA to evaluate the relative potential of hazardous substance releases to cause health or safety problems, or ecological or environmental damage. The HRS score determines whether a site should be placed on the National Priorities List.
Herbicides
Substances used to destroy unwanted vegetation.
Information Repository
A location established by EPA to house information related to the remediation of a Superfund site; repository is located in a building that is accessible to the public.
Maximum Contaminant Levels
Standard for drinking water set by Federal and state laws.
National Priorities List (NPL)
EPA's list of hazardous waste sites identified for possible long-term cleanup under the Superfund program.
Operable Unit
An action taken as one part of the overall site cleanup. A number of operable units can be used in the course of a site cleanup.
Parathion
A pesticide used to destroy or inhibit the actions of animal pests.
Parts Per Billion (ppb)
A concentration of a contaminant presented as a ratio of volumes.
Parts Per Million (ppm)
A concentration of a contaminant presented as a ratio of volumes.
Pesticides
Substances used to destroy or inhibit the actions of plant or animal pests.
Pitch
A by-product derived from the coking of coal. Pitch is used in sealants, roofing compounds, and wood preservatives.
Polychlorinated Biphenols (PCBs)
Moderately toxic compounds once widely used because of their stability.
Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs)
A class of organic (carbon-containing) compounds.
Potentially Responsible Party (PRP)
Individual or company (such as an owner, operator, transporter, or generator) potentially responsible for, or contributing to, the contamination at the Superfund site. Whenever possible, EPA requires PRPs to clean up sites that they have contaminated.
Preliminary Assessment (PA)
Part of a two-phased study called a preliminary assessment/site investigation (PA/SI). The purpose of the PA is to collect and review available information about a hazardous waste site to determine whether the site requires further study through a site inspection.
Proposed Plan
An outline of all of the alternatives evaluated in the feasibility study and a statement of the preferred clean-up method. EPA holds a 30-day public comment period on the Proposed Plan, during which the public may submit comments in writing on the Plan or may voice concerns at a public meeting.
Public Comment Period
A time for the public to review and comment on various documents and EPA actions, usually 30 days or longer upon request.
Record of Decision (ROD)
Formal statements of the selected alternative for restoring the site. The ROD includes a responsiveness summary, in which EPA answers public comments received during the public comment period on the Proposed Plan.
Remedial Action (RA)
Those actions taken at a site to prevent or minimize the release of hazardous substances so that the substances do not migrate to cause danger to present or future public health or the environment.
Remedial Design (RD)
The conceptual and engineering plans for the site remediation.
Remedial Investigation (RI)
Part of a two-phase field study called a remedial investigation/feasibility study. The purpose of the RI phase is to gather the data necessary to fully determine the nature and extent of contamination at a site.
Remedial Project Manager (RPM)
The EPA official responsible for overseeing site clean-up activities.
Removal Action
An immediate action taken to address a release or threatened release of hazardous substances.
Responsiveness Summary
A summary of oral and written public comments received by EPA during a public comment period on key EPA documents, and EPA's responses to those comments. The responsiveness summary is part of the ROD, highlighting community concerns for EPA decision makers.
Risk Assessment
An evaluation performed in an effort to define the risk posed to human health and/or the environment by the presence or potential presence of specific pollutants.
Site Discovery
The ways that EPA learns of conditions that could present risk to human health and the environment, such as citizen complaints of an unusual odor or of a fire.
Site Inspection (SI)
Part of a two-phased study called a preliminary assessment/site inspection (PA/SI). The purpose of the SI is to collect sufficient information to rank the hazard potential of a site. The SI is conducted if the PA turns up evidence that the site may pose a threat to human health and the environment.
Superfund
See CERCLA
Slag
Impurities generated during iron and coke production processes.
Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA)
Law designed to include local government and the public in the process of making decisions about how to address possible chemical hazards in their communities. SARA was signed by the President on October 17, 1986, to amend CERCLA. References made to CERCLA throughout this document should be interpreted as meaning CERCLA, as amended by SARA.
Systox
A pesticide used to destroy or inhibit the actions of animal pests.
Volatile Organic Compound (VOC)
An organic (carbon-containing) compound that evaporates (volatilizes) readily at room temperature.

Region 3 | Mid-Atlantic Cleanup | Mid-Atlantic Superfund |EPA Home | EPA Superfund Homepage


Local Navigation


Jump to main content.