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Jacks Creek / Sitkin Smelting & Refining, Inc.

March 1997

EPA Issues the Proposed Plan for the Jacks Creek Site

Table of Contents

The Proposed Remedial Action Plan

On February 27, 1997, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued a Proposed Remedial Action Plan (Proposed Plan) for the Jacks Creek Superfund Site (the Site). The Proposed Plan presents six of the cleanup alternatives EPA examined to address the waste piles and contaminated soils at the Site. This fact sheet describes the alternatives outlined in the Proposed Plan.

EPA will select a final plan to clean up the Site after the public has had the opportunity to comment on these alternatives. Information on how you can contribute comments on the Proposed Plan is at the end of the fact sheet.

How Did EPA Determine the Cleanup Alternatives in the Proposed Plan?

EPA completed two studies at the Jacks Creek Site: the Remedial Investigation (RI), and the Feasibility Study (FS). The RI identified the types and amounts of contamination at the Site. The FS further examined the information in the RI and recommended cleanup methods for EPA to evaluate. As a result of the RI/FS activities, EPA discovered many contaminants at the Site including a number of heavy metals such as antimony, cadmium, copper, lead, silver, zinc, and aluminum.

Although EPA outlined a number of cleanup methods in the FS, the potentially responsible parties (PRPs)* for the Site offered additional cleanup methods for EPA to review. The PRPs produced a report titled the Addendum Feasibility Study, which described a number of cleanup options not included in EPA's FS. After reviewing all of the information concerning the available cleanup alternatives, EPA combined the list of alternatives from the FS and the list included in the PRP's Addendum Feasibility Study. This resulted in a total of six cleanup alternatives that EPA included in this Proposed Plan.

* Definitions for all words in bold italic type can be found at the end of the fact sheet.

What is the Purpose of the Proposed Plan?

  1. Describes the cleanup alternatives EPA evaluated.
  2. Explains EPA's preferred cleanup alternative and why that alternative is recommended.
  3. Details EPA's evaluation criteria.
  4. Provides a history of the Site and Site activities.
  5. Invites the public to comment on the proposed cleanup alternatives.

Public Meeting

When
March 20, 1997, at 7:00 p.m.
Where
East Derry Elementary School
RR 3
Lewistown, PA
717-543-5615

The Preferred Alternative

Alternative 3: Excavation and Offsite Treatment and Disposal of Soils Exceeding 40,000 Parts Per Million (ppm) Lead; Consolidation and Capping of Remaining Materials Above 1,000 ppm Lead

The Additional Alternatives

Following are descriptions of the additional cleanup alternatives that EPA reviewed in the Jacks Creek Superfund Site Proposed Plan.

Alternative 1: No Action

Superfund requires that EPA consider a "No Action" alternative for every Superfund site to establish a baseline or reference point against which each of the remedial action alternatives are compared. In the event that the other identified alternatives do not offer substantial benefits, the "No Action" alternative would be considered a feasible approach.

This alternative would leave the Site undisturbed and all current and potential future risks would remain.

Alternative 2: Consolidation and Capping of Contaminated Material

Material in the two waste piles would be flattened and consolidated with the following: soils in the floodplain exceeding 500 ppm lead; sediments from Jacks Creek exceeding 500 ppm lead; Site soils outside the floodplain exceeding 3,000 ppm lead; and the battery casings remaining onsite. Buildings onsite in areas to be excavated or capped would be demolished. The building debris also would be consolidated with the waste pile materials. The flattened waste piles and consolidated materials first would be covered with a two-inch layer of crushed limestone and then covered with a multi-layer cap consisting of a barrier layer, a drainage layer, and a seeded topsoil layer. Excavated areas would be restored with clean fill to the original grade and revegetated.

Alternative 4: Onsite Chemical Fixation of Material with over 10,000 ppm Lead; Consolidation and Capping of Treated and Untreated Material; and Institutional Controls

Soil and waste material with lead concentrations above 10,000 ppm would be excavated and treated onsite using a chemical fixation process. The estimated volume of soil and waste requiring treatment is 240,000 tons. The treated material would be consolidated with onsite soils with lead concentrations between 1,000 and 10,000 ppm lead. Sediments from Jacks Creek exceeding 110 ppm of lead also would be consolidated with the treated material.

The remaining features of this alternative, including the multi-layer cap over the consolidated material, backfilling, building demolition, institutional controls, fencing, storm water controls, monitoring, fishing advisories, and maintenance would be the same as those described for Alternative 3.

Alternative 5: Onsite Chemical Fixation of Material with over 1,000 ppm Lead; Consolidation and Capping of Treated Material and Sediment; and Institutional Controls

Soil and waste material having lead concentrations above 1,000 ppm would be excavated and treated onsite using a chemical fixation process. The estimated volume of soils and waste requiring treatment is 670,000 tons. The treated materials then would be consolidated on the unused portion of the Site and covered.

The remaining features of this alternative, including deed restrictions, fence construction, building demolition, fishing advisories, and long-term monitoring would be the same as those described for Alternative 3.

Alternative 6: Onsite Chemical Fixation of Material with over 1,000 ppm Lead; Offsite Disposal of Treated Material and Sediment

Soil and waste material having lead concentrations above 1,000 ppm lead would be excavated and treated onsite using a chemical fixation process. The estimated volume of soil and waste requiring treatment is 670,000 tons. The treated material would be disposed offsite at a solid waste/municipal landfill.

The remaining features of this alternative, including deed restrictions, fence construction, building demolition, fishing advisories, and long-term monitoring would be the same as those described for Alternative 3.

Evaluation Criteria

Before a proposed alternative becomes EPA's preferred cleanup choice, it must meet a series of evaluation criteria. These criteria serve as standards for the cleanup of all Superfund sites. EPA designed the preferred alternative - Alternative 3: Excavation and Offsite Treatment and Disposal of Soils Exceeding 40,000 ppm Lead; Consolidation and Capping of Remaining Materials Above 1,000 ppm Lead - to address the contaminated soil and waste piles at the Jacks Creek Superfund Site.

This remedy is the best combination of the evaluation criteria when ranked by the first eight. Below is a list of all nine evaluation criteria.

  1. Protection of Human Health and the Environment
  2. Compliance with EPA Standards
  3. Long-term Effectiveness
  4. Reduction of Toxicity, Mobility, or Volume of Waste
  5. Short-term Effectiveness
  6. Implementability
  7. Cost Effectiveness
  8. State Acceptance
  9. Community Acceptance (to be determined during the public comment period)

Site Background

The Jacks Creek Site occupies approximately 105 acres in the village of Maitland; a rural farming area of Mifflin County, Pennsylvania. It is shown on the site location map below. The site lies about five miles east of the Borough of Lewistown near the border of Decatur and Derry Townships.

The Sitkin Smelting Company owned and operated the Site as a metal smelting and recycling facility from 1958 until 1977. The Sitkin Smelting Company produced mainly brass and bronze ingots from scrap metal.

In 1977, the Sitkin Smelting Company claimed bankruptcy and closed. During the same year, Joseph Krentzman & Sons Inc. (Krentzman) purchased 95 acres of the Sitkin property and began operating a metal scrap yard. Currently, Krentzman uses a portion of the property for a scrap metal and aluminum recycling business.

The Jacks Creek Site consists of a complex combination of buildings, waste piles, scrap materials, and areas of contamination. The Site contains a 140,000-ton ball mill tailings pile and a 7,500-ton aluminum dross pile. A railroad track runs through the central portion of the Site. Jacks Creek runs along the northwest property boundary of the Site and flows west-southwest to the Juniata River. The creek is approximately 20 to 30 feet wide at the Site with an average depth of two to three feet.

Public Comment Period

EPA relies on public input to ensure that the proposed cleanup alternative meets the needs and concerns of the community. Currently, EPA is holding a public comment period on the Proposed Plan. The comment period began on February 27, 1997, and will end on April 28, 1997. Your comments and questions about the Proposed Plan will be addressed at the public meeting being held on March 20, 1997 (see page one for more details). Also, you can call or use the form on page six to contact the following EPA representatives with your comments or questions.

Remedial Project Manager
David Turner
215-814-3216
turner.david@epa.gov

Community Involvement Coordinator
Richard Kuhn
215-814-3063
kuhn.richard@epa.gov

U.S. EPA Region III
1650 Arch St.
Philadelphia, PA 19103-2029

For More Information

The Administrative Record File is an official collection of reports, correspondence, and other documents that reflect EPA's process of selecting a cleanup plan for the Site. You can review the Jacks Creek Site Administrative Record File at the following locations:

U.S. EPA Region III
1650 Arch St.
Philadelphia, PA 19103-2029
215-814-3157
Contact: Anna Butch
butch.anna@epa.gov
Hours: Monday - Friday, 8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Please call to schedule a visit.

Mifflin County Library
123 North Wayne St.
Lewistown, PA 17044
717-242-2391
Contact: Dorothy Coffman
Hours: Monday - Thursday, 9:00 a.m. - 8:00 p.m.
Friday, 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Saturday, 9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.
Sunday, 2:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Glossary of Terms

Ball Mill Tailings
Piles of waste left over from the smelting process.
Dredge
To remove sediment from the bottom of a body of water.
Dross
An impurity that forms on the surface of melted metal.
Ingot
A mass of metal that is cast into bars.
Parts Per Million (ppm)
A unit of measurement used to express the amount of a substance in another. For example, one gallon of water in one million gallons would be one ppm.
Potentially Responsible Parties (PRP)
The companies or people responsible for contamination at a site. Whenever possible, through administrative and legal actions, EPA requires these parties to clean up hazardous waste sites they have contaminated.
Sediment
Soils or sands located beneath a body of water.
Smelting
To melt ores or scrap metals at high temperatures in a furnace so as to separate impurities from pure metal.

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