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Potomac Yard

Community Relations Plan for the Potomac Yard Site

Alexandria, Arlington County, Virginia

Prepared for U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Region III, 1650 Arch St, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19103-2029
On July 17, 1996 Under ESS Region III Work Assignment No. ESS-062

For additional information, contact Lisa Brown (Community Involvement Coordinator) 800-553-2509 or 215-814-5528

Table of Contents

  1. Overview of the Community Relations Plan
  2. EPA Background
    1. Superfund
    2. Superfund Accelerated Cleanup Model
    3. Relevant EPA Groups
    4. State, County, & City Role
  3. Site Description and History
    1. Site Description
    2. Site History
  4. Community Background
    1. Community Profile
    2. Community Involvement and Community Concerns
  5. Goals of the Community Relations Plan
  6. Community Relations Activities

APPENDICES

  1. Interested Party and Contact List (excluding local residents for privacy protection)
  2. Public Meeting Location and Stenographic Information
  3. Information Repositories
  4. Glossary of Technical Terms
  5. Technical Assistance Grant Information
  6. Sample Fact Sheets

FIGURES

Map not available

  1. Site Location and Layout

TABLE

  1. Community Relations Activities and Timing

Section 1: Overview of the Community Relations Plan

EPA developed this Community Relations Plan to encourage community involvement and two-way communication between the Site community and EPA during the Site cleanup. EPA is committed to acknowledging and addressing the Site-related concerns of local community members including residents, public officials, media, and other interested parties. Because awareness of the contamination at the Potomac Yard Site (Site) is not high, community involvement in the Site has been moderate. Recently though, activities at the Potomac Yard Site and ongoing concern about its future use have heightened community interest in EPA's work in the area.

EPA will use this Community Relations Plan as a guide to conduct community relations activities as part of the Superfund process at the Site. This Community Relations Plan describes: the Site and its history; past community involvement; current community concerns; and the steps EPA will take to address these concerns. EPA's major goal is to keep community members informed about and involved in the Site cleanup process. EPA prepared this Community Relations Plan from many information sources, including EPA Site files, public meetings, and input from local residents and public officials. The EPA Region III office will oversee the implementation of all activities outlined in this Plan.

This Community Relations Plan is divided into six sections, plus appendices. Section 1 is an Overview of the Community Relations Plan. Section 2, EPA Background, provides an overview of Superfund and relevant EPA sections, divisions, branches, and offices, and the role of the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality (VADEQ). Section 3, Site Description and History, gives a brief summary of the Site and its history. Section 4, Community Background, presents a profile of the community surrounding the Site, a history of community relations at the Site, Site-related concerns and issues raised by community members, and a listing of the community's non-Site environmental concerns. Section 5, Goals of the Community Relations Plan, describes the community relations goals that EPA will achieve by involving local residents, public officials, and local news media in Site activities.Section 6, Community Relations Activities, describes the activities EPA will conduct to achieve its community relations goals at the Site.

Section 2: EPA Background

2.1 Superfund

Superfund is the Federal government's program to clean up uncontrolled or abandoned hazardous waste sites. Superfund is guided by the National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP). Superfund's laws, officially known as the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), were passed by Congress in 1980 and amended in 1986 by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA). Superfund gives EPA the authority to stop ongoing releases or prevent potential releases of hazardous substances; enables EPA to make the parties responsible for contaminating a site pay for its cleanup; and provides funding for the cleanup when money from responsible parties is not available.

2.2 Superfund Accelerated Cleanup Model

The Potomac Yard Site is being addressed under a streamlined Superfund process known as the Superfund Accelerated Cleanup Model (SACM). The SACM was established to make site cleanups more timely and efficient. The SACM combines early actions, such as removing hazardous wastes or contaminated materials, with ongoing studies so that immediate threats to public health or the environment are addressed while long-term cleanups are being planned. Under the SACM, the Potomac Yard Site is being addressed as a long-term, non-time critical removal action. The SACM process at the Potomac Yard Site involves the activities described below.

Early Action Response Plan

After receiving initial site information, EPA decides whether action at the site is emergency-time critical or non-time critical. An emergency-time critical removal action is required when prompt action is needed to prevent an immediate risk to human health or the environment. Non-time critical removal actions are required when less urgent actions are needed to stabilize the site and/or eliminate contamination.

Extent of Contamination Study (ECS)

If EPA determines that proposed actions at a site are non-time critical, as at the Potomac Yard Site, EPA performs an Extent of Contamination Study (ECS). The ECS determines what contaminants are present at the site and in what amount. The ECS also describes the site and its history, outlines previous investigations and clean-up actions, describes the data collection strategies used by EPA, and summarizes data results.

Baseline Human Health and Ecological Risk Assessment (BHERA)

The Baseline Human Health and Ecological Risk Assessment (BHERA) evaluates the risks to human health and the environment associated with potential exposures to the contaminants at the site. The BHERA outlines the potential routes of exposure to contaminants and determines the likelihood that human health and the environment could be adversely affected by contamination.

Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis (EE/CA)

The Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis (EE/CA) analyzes clean-up alternatives for the site. The EE/CA provides a framework for evaluating and selecting alternative cleanup technologies and identifies which cleanup alternatives would work best with the site's specific conditions, contaminants, and risks posed.

Action Memorandum

The Action Memorandum summarizes public comment on the EE/CA received during the public comment period and identifies the removal action EPA will conduct to address contamination at the site.

2.3 Relevant EPA Groups

Headquartered in Washington, D.C., EPA has 10 regional offices, each of which have community relations and technical staff involved in Superfund site cleanups. EPA Region III encompasses Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, West Virginia, and Washington, D.C. The EPA Region III office, located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, houses several divisions, branches, and sections that work with other EPA regional offices when necessary. The EPA branches most involved with the Potomac Yard Site are described below.

Community Involvement Branch (Region III)

This branch oversees communication between EPA and all residents, public officials, media representatives, and community groups associated with hazardous waste sites. The Community Involvement Branch is responsible for the planning, coordination, and implementation of activities designed to enhance communication and community involvement for each site. Each site is assigned a Community Involvement Coordinator who works closely with EPA technical staff to keep the local community informed and involved during cleanup work. (The Community Involvement Coordinator for the Potomac Yard Site is Lisa Brown. See Appendix A, page 6, for her address and telephone number.)

Superfund Removal Branch (Region III)

EPA's Superfund Removal Branch manages short-term and long-term removal actions and emergency removal responses. These actions include responses to accidental releases of hazardous substances, as well as short-term work at Sites on EPA's National Priorities List and long-term non-time critical removal actions under the SACM. Removal actions are supervised by EPA On-Scene Coordinators (OSCs). (The On-Scene Coordinator for the Potomac Yard Site is Jeffrey Dodd. See Appendix A, page 6, for his address and telephone number.)

2.3 State, County, & City Role

Virginia Department of Environmental Quality

The Virginia Department of Environmental Quality (VADEQ) is the support agency for EPA-led studies and cleanups at federal Superfund sites in Virginia. (See Appendix A for the name, address, and telephone number of the VADEQ contact person for the Potomac Yard Site.) VADEQ reviews and comments on Site workplans and studies, participates in community relations activities, and provides technical assistance to EPA.

Arlington County, Virginia

Arlington County officials work with EPA and the City of Alexandria at the Site to oversee all cleanup work. County officials attend meetings with EPA and other stakeholders in the Site cleanup and review and provide comments on EPA documents. (See Appendix A for a listing of relevant Arlington County officials.)

City of Alexandria, Virginia

The City of Alexandria acts as a liaison between EPA and other stakeholders in the Site cleanup. Future plans to develop the Site property make the City of Alexandria a direct stakeholder in the cleanup. The City of Alexandria maintains a regular presence at the Potomac Yard Site and provides local assistance and guidance to EPA when needed. Alexandria officials also review and provide comments on EPA documents and Site-related material. (See Appendix A for a listing of relevant Alexandria officials.)

Section 3: Site Description and History

3.1 Site Description

The Potomac Yard Site occupies approximately 340 acres in Alexandria, Arlington County,Virginia (See Figure 1) and is bordered by 27th Street to the north, Braddock Road to the south, U.S. Route 1 to the west, and the George Washington Memorial Parkway to the east. Located adjacent to the Site are several residential communities which include single family homes, condominiums, and townhomes. Daingerfield Island, a mixed-use recreational facility, and the Potomac River lie to the east of the Site. Four Mile Run, a perennial stream which flows east to the Potomac River, divides the northern portion of the Site.

3.2 Site History

The Potomac Yard Site served as a railroad switching and maintenance yard for over 100 years. Railroad operations began in the mid-1800s with development of the Site into a major rail yard in the early 1900s. By 1937, the rail yard had expanded to approximately its maximum extent. Potomac Yard serviced several different railroad lines with locomotive classification, switching, maintenance, servicing, and refueling conducted at the Site.

In 1989, a decommissioning process of the Potomac Yard Site began and continued through 1993. During the decommissioning process, most of the switching track, locomotive maintenance facilities, and other rail yard buildings were removed. Currently, the Site is owned by the Richmond Fredericksburg and Potomac (RF&P) Railroad Company, which is owned by the Virginia Retirement System.

In 1987, EPA identified the Potomac Yard as a potential threat to human health and the environment, placed it on the EPA CERCLIS database, and targeted the Site for further investigation. As a result, the Virginia Department of Waste Management (VDWM) conducted a Preliminary Assessment (PA) and Site Investigation (SI) in 1988 and 1989 respectively. The SI identified several metals present in soils at the Site above health-based levels. In addition, volatile organic compounds and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were found in the soil.

In 1990, RF&P Railroad Company, the Site owner and potentially responsible party (PRP) conducted an Environmental Assessment on the northern portion of the Site to evaluate the property for future development. The Assessment evaluated approximately 50 of the northernmost acres of the Site to determine if soil, sediment, surface water, and ground water contamination exists. Approximately 144 surface water, subsurface soil, sediment, and groundwater samples from eight monitoring wells were collected. The Assessment also revealed that several metals were present in the samples as well as petroleum hydrocarbons in one soil and groundwater sample.

In 1991, RF&P Railroad Company conducted another Environmental Assessment of the central operations center of the Site. This Assessment revealed that approximately seven feet of diesel fuel was observed in ground water monitoring wells. The release was assumed to have occurred over many years due to over-filling of locomotives and leaks in the fuel storage and distribution system. A number of recovery wells were installed in this area of the Site and two product skimmer pumps were installed in May 1994 to continue collecting the fuel oil. The removal of fuel oil is still being conducted at the Site by RF&P Railroad Company under the oversight and monitoring of the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality.

In July 1992, RF&P Railroad Company collected 305 soil, 41 groundwater, 26 sediment, and 26 surface water samples in the A-1 area of the Site. The A-1 area includes the area of the Site between South Glebe Road to the north and the Monroe Street bridge to the south. As a result, EPA then negotiated with RF&P Railroad Company to develop a work plan and study the contamination on-Site to determine if clean-up actions are necessary. On September 22, 1992, EPA and RF&P Railroad Company entered into an Administrative Order of Consent to investigate the nature and extent of contamination on-Site and evaluate various methods to clean it up.

Between June 1993 and and March 1995, RF&P Railroad Company collected various soil, sediment, and surface water samples and submitted a draft Extent of Contamination Study (ECS) as well as a Risk Assessment to EPA for the A-1 area and all other areas outside of the A-1 area. EPA and other support agencies reviewed and submitted comments on this report in May 1995. The final ECS was approved in September 1995.

Based upon results of the ECS and the Baseline Human Health and Ecological Risk Assessment (BHERA), EPA determined that further removal actions are appropriate and that an Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis (EE/CA) will be completed. The EE/CA for the Potomac Yard Site is being developed by RF&P Railroad Company pursuant to a Consent Order between RF&P and EPA. EPA granted approval to RF&P Railroad Company on October 6, 1995 to begin the EE/CA. The EE/CA includes evaluating, proposing, and reviewing alternatives to prevent the release of contaminants from the Site and developing an off-Site ecological risk assessment to address the effect of contamination on off-Site receptors. Once the EE/CA is completed and approved, EPA will release the EE/CA for public review and comment before selecting a final cleanup action.

Section 4: Community Background

4.1 Community Profile

The City of Alexandria is a historic community that contains the landmarks of the nation when it was young. Alexandria is identified as the city of neighborhoods and a "hotbed of civic activism" that thrives on the diversity of its community members. Alexandria is just 15.75 square miles in size, however, the residential population (116,400) has experienced a slow, but steady growth over the last five years. Alexandria is located at the head of deep-water navigation on the Potomac River and is located just a few miles from Washington, DC. Alexandria has a state-of-the-art rail transportation system, as well as easy access to major thruways such as Interstate 95, the Capital Beltway, and the George Washington Memorial Parkway. The city is governed by a mayor, and six city council members who are elected at-large for three-year terms. Alexandria maintains full-time fire and police departments and is serviced by public water and sewer facilities. Alexandria's major employers include the Department of Defense, Alexandria Hospital, the Washington Metropolitan Transit Authority, and the Pentagon Federal Credit Union. Alexandria houses two newspapers and receives information from other media outlets in the Arlington and Washington metropolitan area.

The immediate Site community is located adjacent to the Site in several residential neighborhoods, townhomes, and condominium complexes such as Del Ray, Rosemont, Auburn Village, Lynhaven, Mt. Jefferson, and Warwick Village. Many in the Site community belong to one of the various civic associations which regularly meet and discuss community events and ways to improve the local neighborhoods. Crystal City, a high-rise retail and commercial area, borders the Site to the north. Arlington County, a mixed residential and commercial area, also borders the Site.

4.2 Community Involvement and Community Concerns

Although community awareness of the Potomac Yard Site is high, community involvement in EPA's work at the Site has been limited. This can be attributed to the extensive investigations and studies that have been undertaken at the Site to determine the type of contamination present and the best methods to clean it up. However, EPA has kept local city officials informed of ongoing activity at the Site, responded to requests for information from local community members and civic groups, and spoken with various community members about their Site-related concerns. EPA also established three local information repositories which contain technical documents, updated fact sheets, general information on the Superfund process, and other Site-related material generated during EPA's work at the Site. (See Appendix C for the addresses of the information repositories.)

Listed below are some of the concerns raised by local community members during conversations with the EPA Community Involvement Coordinator and the EPA On-Scene Coordinator.

Impact of the Site on the Potomac River

Community members expressed concern that contamination from the Potomac Yard Site could adversely affect the Potomac River and the aquatic life it supports.

Interim Site Usage and Future Site Development

Many in the community are concerned about the current use of the Potomac Yard property and how the property can be returned to beneficial use after the cleanup.

Risks to Wildlife from Current Site Surface Conditions

Local residents are concerned about whether current surface conditions at the Site are hazardous to animals and other wildlife who wander onto the Site.

Contamination Cleanup vs. Contamination Containment

Community members expressed concern that an ongoing contamination cleanup would be more detrimental to their communities than contamination containment.

Highway Development and Increased Traffic Patterns

Local residents near the Site are concerned that potential highway development near the Site will increase the traffic flow around and through their communities causing new traffic problems and congestion.

Economic Development and Alexandria's Growth

Many community members are concerned that the Site area will be used to promote economic development and growth in Alexandria and they are concerned about the effects of that growth on their communities.

Other Concerns Non-Related to the Site

Several community members are concerned about groundwater contamination in other nearby communities. Residents are generally concerned about the safety and quality of the drinking water supply in the Blue Plains community.

Section 5: Goals of the Community Relations Plan

EPA's Community Relations Plan for the Potomac Yard Site is guided by four main objectives. These objectives, listed below, involve the cooperative efforts of the EPA Community Involvement Coordinator and On-Scene Coordinator for the Site, as well as other EPA staff.

1. Provide community members with useful information about the Site and the Superfund process.

EPA will use fact sheets, newsletters, public notices, public meetings, news releases, and other means to explain the Site evaluation and cleanup process and describe how Site Removal activities fit into the general Superfund process. EPA will explain complex Site activities in general terms so that community members understand the cleanup process.

2. Provide timely, Site-specific updates to the community.

EPA will regularly update local residents, city officials, community and civic groups, and other interested parties on the progress of the Site cleanup. EPA will make phone calls, hold public meetings, and distribute written material to keep community members updated on Site activities. In addition, EPA will make Site-related documents available to the public.

3. Enlist and encourage the participation of community members and civic associations in EPA's activities and provide opportunities for community input.

EPA will encourage the Site community to take an active role in the evaluation and cleanup process through community outreach activities. Such activities may include a Superfund or EE/CA workshop, availability sessions, Site tours, and community interviews. EPA will also listen to and address Site-related comments and questions voiced by community members and civic associations.

4. Enhance communication between EPA, city officials, and the media.

EPA will provide Alexandria City and Arlington County officials with information about Site activities and will invite and address questions from them. EPA will also distribute and thoroughly explain Site-information to the local media so that they can convey accurate information to community members about the Site cleanup.

Section 6: Community Relations Activities

Described below are 15 community relations activities for the Potomac Yard Site designed to achieve the goals summarized in Section 5. Please note that the sequential numbers which accompany the 15 community relations activities are for reference only, and do not necessarily indicate their relative importance. The anticipated time frame for these activities is shown in the table on page 21.

1. Notify the surrounding Site communities of upcoming Site activities on a regular basis.

Objective
To minimize any concerns or disruptions to the community or their normal schedule. Regular updates on Site activities will enhance public participation in the Site cleanup and enable the community to provide informed input to EPA.
Method
EPA will provide printed material, make telephone calls, and hold availability sessions to focus on current and upcoming Site cleanup work. EPA will also use these methods to announce the release of important Site documents, other milestones, and to publicize the time, place, and purpose of public meetings.

2. Notify local media of upcoming Site activities on a regular basis.

Objective
To ensure the distribution of accurate and consistent information about Site activities. EPA will issue press releases, contact media representatives, and hold news briefings to provide the media with timely and accurate information. Communication between EPA and VADEQ is also important to ensure that EPA's updates are coordinated with relevant VADEQ activities.
Method
News releases, telephone calls, and briefings will: detail the current and upcoming Site activities; announce the release of key documents and other milestones; and publicize the time, place, and purpose of public meetings.

3. Designate an EPA Community Involvement Coordinator to handle Site inquiries.

Objective
To ensure prompt, accurate, and consistent responses and information about the Site. If EPA's Community Involvement Coordinator is unable to provide adequate information, inquiries will be directed to the proper EPA contact.
Method
Lisa Brown is the EPA Community Involvement Coordinator assigned to the Site. She will work closely with Jeffrey Dodd, EPA's On-Scene Coordinator for the Site. (See Appendix A, page 6, for their addresses and phone numbers.)

4. Respond promptly and accurately to inquiries from local residents, public officials, community groups, and the media.

Objective
To maintain two-way communication between EPA and the Site community. Prompt, accurate responses will strengthen community involvement and enhance cooperation between EPA and other parties involved in the Site cleanup. Prompt responses to inquiries from local residents, community groups, the media, and local officials will increase public awareness and understanding of Site activities.
Method
Personal responses, meetings, and printed material will provide the basis for prompt responses from EPA to inquiries from the community. EPA's Community Involvement Coordinator will direct all inquiries to the proper contacts and ensure that a response is returned to the community in a timely manner.

5. Prepare and distribute Site updates, fact sheets, and technical summaries.

Objective
To provide an easy-to-read update on Site activities. Site updates and fact sheets generally summarize technical work and are mailed to residents, community groups, local and state officials, and other interested parties.
Method
Fact sheets will be mailed to all parties on the Site mailing list and copies will also be placed in various locations in the Site community. Fact sheets may include: information about past, current, and upcoming Site activities; question and answer sections focusing on community concerns; overviews of cleanup technologies; s; listings of EPA and other relevant contact persons; and tear-off forms so that residents can add their names to the EPA Site mailing list. Copies of fact sheets will also be available at the local EPA information repositories for the Site. (See Appendix F for a copy of the fact sheet produced by EPA in November 1995.)

6. Maintain contact with the local community and civic groups and the City of Alexandria and Arlington County.

Objective
To maintain good communication between the Site communities, EPA, Arlington County, and the City of Alexandria, and to help keep other residents informed of Site activities. (See Appendix A for the names, addresses, and telephone numbers of relevant City of Alexandria, Arlington County, and community and civic group contact persons.)
Method
EPA will inform the community and civic groups and relevant officials from the City of Alexandria and Arlington County of Site developments and upcoming community involvement activities.

7. Maintain and update the local information repositories.

Objective
To provide a reference point where the public can review the latest information on the Site cleanup. EPA will update this collection of Site-specific documents on the Potomac Yard Site and the Superfund process so that citizens can follow the progress of the Site cleanup and provide informed comment.
Method
As Site documents are released, they will be placed into each information repository. These repositories serve as a reference collection of Site information. Each information repository contains the Administrative Record file, which includes the investigation and study reports and other documents used by EPA to select clean-up actions. The repository also includes the Community Relations Plan, information about the Technical Assistance Grant program, and other information about the Site and the general Superfund process. EPA has established three local information repositories. (See Appendix C for each repository's address, telephone number, and business hours.)

8. Provide Technical Assistance Grant information.

Objective
To allow the Site community a chance to review the work being conducted at the Site. EPA will provide information about the Technical Assistance Grant program and review grant applications from qualified groups.
Method
EPA will make available the application for a Technical Assistance Grant to any community member who requests it. (See Appendix E for information on how to obtain an application and reference material.)

9. Release an Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis (EE/CA) and hold a public comment period on it.

Objective
To identify various clean-up options and request public input on EPA's recommended course of action. As required, EPA will review all comments received during any public comment period before making its final selection of a cleanup alternative.
Method
EPA's public comment period on the EE/CA lasts for a minimum of 30 days, and can be extended. EPA will announce the public comment period prior to releasing the EE/CA. (See public notices on following page.)

10. Publish public notices.

Objective
To inform the community of key Site developments, public meetings, and the release of Site documents.
Method
Notices will appear in the local news section of the Alexandria Journal and may be published in other community publications as well. Notices include relevant dates, times, and locations of meetings or activities, as well as the name, address, and phone number of the primary EPA contact person. Public notices regarding Site-specific documents, such as the EE/CA, will briefly summarize the document.

11. Conduct public meetings or information sessions.

Objective
To update the community on Site developments and address any community questions and comments.
Method
Public meetings will be held in the evening at a central location in the Site community so that all interested parties will be able to attend. Information sessions are usually held all day and can be attended at any time. (See Appendix B for possible public meeting locations.) The EPA Community Involvement Coordinator, the EPA On-Scene Coordinator, and other EPA staff will be present at these events. EPA will hold meetings or information sessions as needed. If appropriate, EPA will investigate the possibility of videotaping public meetings and demonstrations for display on the local cable access channel.

12. Prepare a Responsiveness Summary.

Objective
To document and summarize any community input received by EPA during an EPA public comment period.
Method
EPA will prepare a Responsiveness Summary as a section of the Action Memorandum. The Responsiveness Summary summarizes community comments and questions received during any EPA public comment period, as well as EPA's responses.

13. Conduct informal meetings and workshops.

Objective
To enable EPA to explain the Superfund process, describe cleanup technologies, share information on Site-related issues, and request input from the community.
Method
EPA will conduct informal meetings and workshops on an as-needed basis and as requested by the community. They will take place at a convenient location within the community and will involve the participation of the EPA Community Involvement Coordinator, the EPA On-Scene Coordinator, as well as other EPA staff and other individuals as needed.

14. Maintain and update Site mailing lists.

Objective
To use in mailing Site fact sheets, providing telephone updates, and conducting other community involvement activities.
Method
EPA maintains an up-to-date listing of federal, state, and local officials; local media; community groups; and other interested parties. EPA also maintains a separate and private list of residents, obtained from local tax records, public meeting sign-in sheets and community interviews. To protect the privacy of these persons, EPA will not release the list to the press or general public. (See Appendix A for the names, addresses, and telephone numbers of federal, state, and local officials; local media; community groups; and other interested parties.) If you would like to be added to the Site's mailing list, please contact the Community Involvement Coordinator, Lisa Brown (see Appendix A, page 6).

15. Revise the Community Relations Plan.

Objective
To identify and address community needs, issues, or concerns regarding the Site or the cleanup remedy that are not currently addressed in this Community Relations Plan.
Method
EPA will revise the Community Relations Plan as community concern warrants or at least every two years in lieu of an Action Memorandum at the Site. The Revised Community Relations Plan will update the information presented in the previous version of the Community Relations Plan.

Table 1: Community Relations Activities and Timing

Activity

Timing

1. Notify residents of upcoming Site activities.

As Site activity warrants.

2. Notify local media of upcoming Site activities.

As Site activity warrants.

3. Designate an EPA primary contact person.

Person has been designated.

4. Respond promptly and accurately to inquiries.

As needed.

5. Distribute Site updates and fact sheets.

As the Site cleanup progresses.

6. Maintain contact with the local community and civic groups.

As Site activity warrants.

7. Maintain and update each local Information Repository.

As new Site documents are released.

8. Provide Technical Assistance Grant information.

As requested.

9. Release an EE/CA and provide a public comment period on this Analysis.

A minimum of 30-days.

10. Publish Public Notices (newspaper ads).

At milestones, such as the EE/CA, Action reasons Memorandum, and for other reasons as needed.

11. Conduct public meetings.

After releasing the EE/CA, before beginning clean-up work, and for other reasons as needed.

12. Prepare a Responsiveness Summary.

After a public comment period.

13. Conduct informal meetings and workshops.

As needed, and based on community interest.

14. Maintain and update Site mailing lists.

Lists have been established; update as needed.

15. Revise the Community Relations Plan.

As needed.

APPENDIX A

Interested Party and Contact List

A. Federal Elected Officials

Senator John W. Warner
225 Russell Office Building
Washington, DC 20510
202-224-2023

(Anne Loomis - Legislative Assistant)
600 East Main Street
Richmond, VA 23219
804-771-2579

Senator Charles S. Robb
154 Russell Office Building
Washington, DC 20510
202-224-4024

(Nicole Venable - Legislative Assistant)
1011 East Main Street
Richmond, VA 23219
804- 771-2221

Representative James P. Moran
430 Cannon House Office Building
Washington, DC 20515
202- 225-4376

(Chris King - Legislative Assistant)
5115 Franconia Road, Suite B
Alexandria, VA 22310 (703) 971-4700

B. State Elected Officials

Governor George Allen
Office of the Governor
P.O. Box 1475
Richmond, VA 23212
804-786-2211

Donald S. Beyer, Jr.
Lieutenant Governor
101 North Eighth Street
Supreme Court Building, Room 104
Richmond, VA 23219
804- 786-2078

James S. Gilmore
Attorney General
900 East Main Street
Richmond, VA 23219
804-786-2071

Helen Fahey
United States Attorney
2100 Jamison Avenue
Alexandria, VA 22314
703- 299- 3700

Delegate Brian Moran
General Assembly Building
P.O. Box 406
Richmond, VA 23203
804-786-7253

Delegate Marian Van Landingham
General Assembly Building
P.O. Box 406
Richmond, VA 23203
804-786-6718

301 King Street
Alexandria, VA 22314
703- 549-2511

Senator Patricia S. Ticer
General Assembly Building
P.O. Box 396
Richmond, VA 23219 (804) 786-6074

301 King Street
Alexandria, VA 22314
703- 549-5770

C. Local Officials

Kerry Donley, Mayor
City of Alexandria
301 King Street, Room 2300
Alexandria, VA 22314
703- 838- 4500

Redella Pepper, Vice-Mayor
City of Alexandria
301 King Street, Room 2300
Alexandria, VA 22314
703-838- 4500

William C. Cleveland, Councilman
City of Alexandria
301 King Street, Room 2300
Alexandria, VA 22314
703-838- 4500

William D. Euille, Councilman
City of Alexandria
301 King Street, Room 2300
Alexandria, VA 22314
703- 838- 2680

Lonnie C. Rich, Councilman
City of Alexandria
301 King Street, Room 2300
Alexandria, VA 22314
703- 836- 7441

Lois Walker, Councilwoman
City of Alexandria
301 King Street, Room 2300
Alexandria, VA 22314
703-549- 3360

Vola Lawson, City Manager
City of Alexandria
301 King Street, Room 2300
Alexandria, VA 22314
703-838- 4300

Beverly Steele, Deputy City Manager
City of Alexandria
301 King Street, Room 2300
Alexandria, VA 22314
703-838- 4300

Michele R. Evans, Assistant City Manager
City of Alexandria
301 King Street, Room 2300
Alexandria, VA 22314
703-838- 4300

J. Thomas Brannan, Assistant City Manager
City of Alexandria
301 King Street, Room 2300
Alexandria, VA 22314
703- 838- 4300

Nancy Coats, Assistant City Manager
City of Alexandria
301 King Street, Room 2300
Alexandria, VA 22314
703- 838- 4300

Joshua Lipsman, MD, Health Director
City of Alexandria
517 North Saint Asaph Street
Alexandria, VA 22314
703- 838- 4880

Robert D. Pritchett, Environmental Health Director
City of Alexandria
517 North Saint Asaph Street
Alexandria, VA 22314
703- 838- 4880

William J. Skrabak, Manager
Office of Environmental Quality
517 North Saint Asaph Street
Alexandria, VA 22314
703- 838- 4850

Thomas F. O'Kane, Director
Transportation and Environmental Services
301 King Street, Room 4300
Alexandria, VA 22314
703- 838- 4966

Warren M. Bell, Engineer
Transportation and Environmental Services
301 King Street, Room 4300
Alexandria, VA 22314
703- 838- 3816

Paul E. Radauskas, Director
Code Enforcement
301 King Street
Alexandria, VA 22314
703- 838- 4360

James B. Hunter, Chairman
Arlington County Board
2100 Clarendon Boulevard
Arlington, VA 22201
703- 358-3130

Ellen M. Bozman, Vice-Chairman
Arlington County Board
2100 Clarendon Boulevard
Arlington, VA 22201
703- 358-3130

Albert C. Eisenberg
Arlington County Board
2100 Clarendon Boulevard
Arlington, VA 22201
703- 358-3130

Paul F. Ferguson
Arlington County Board
2100 Clarendon Boulevard
Arlington, VA 22201
703- 358-3130

Christopher E. Zimmerman
Arlington County Board
2100 Clarendon Boulevard
Arlington, VA 22201
703- 358-3130

Anton S. Gardner
Arlington County Manager
2100 Clarendon Boulevard
Arlington, VA 22201
703- 358-3120

William T. Donahue
Arlington County Deputy Manager
2100 Clarendon Boulevard
Arlington, VA 22201
703- 358-3120

Jill F. Neuville, Acting Director
Arlington County Department of Environmental Services
2100 Clarendon Boulevard
Arlington, VA 22201
703- 358-4488

R.S. Kem, Director
Arlington County Department of Public Works
2100 Clarendon Boulevard
Arlington, VA 22201
703- 358-3711

D. EPA Officials

Lisa Brown (3HW43)
Community Involvement Coordinator
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region III
1650 Arch St
Philadelphia, PA 19103-2029
215-814-5528 or 800-553-2509
215- 814-5102 FAX
brown.lisa@epa.gov

Jeffrey Dodd (3HW32)
On-Scene Coordinator
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region III
401 Methodist Building
11th & Chapline Streets
Wheeling, WV 26003
304-234-0254
304-234-0259 FAX
dodd.jeff@epa.gov

E. State Agencies

Pat McMurray
Virginia Department of Environmental Quality
629 East Main Street
Richmond, VA 23219
804-698-4186

Cynthia Sale
Virginia Department of Environmental Quality
1549 Old Bridge Road
Suite 108
Woodbridge, VA 22192
703- 490-8922

F. Media

Newspapers/Publications

Alexandria Journal
Scott Lawson
2720 Prosperity Avenue
Fairfax, VA 22034
703- 846-8428
703-846-8396 FAX

Alexandria Gazette Packet/Mt. Vernon Gazette
Crystal Waters
1700 Diagonal Road, Suite 410
Alexandria, VA 22314
703- 549- 0004
703-548-0390 FAX

The Washington Post
Bob Rolls
1150 15th Street NW
Washington, DC 20510
800- 765-7678

Radio Stations

WBZS-AM (co-owned with WJZW-FM)
Steve Chaconas, News Director
510 King Street
Suite 315
Alexandria, VA 22314
703- 683- 3000
202-289-7730
703-549-3960 FAX

WAVA-FM
Richard Lee, News Director
1901 North Moore Street
Suite 200
Arlington, VA 22208
703- 807-2266
703-807-2248 FAX

WETA-FM
Dan Gawthrop, PSA Director
P.O. Box 2626
Washington, DC 20013
703- 998-2790
703-824-7288 FAX

Television Stations

WJLA-TV (ABC)
Gary Wordlaw, News Director
3007 Tilden Street NW
Washington, DC 20008
202- 364-7777
202-364-2481 FAX

WUSA-TV (CBS)
Robert Mennie, News Director
4100 Wisconsin Avenue NW
Washington, DC 20016
202- 895-5999
202- 966-7948 FAX

WRC-TV (NBC)
Richard Reingold, News Director
4001 Nebraska Avenue NW
Washington, DC 20016
202-885-4000
202-885-5022 FAX

G. Other Interested Parties

Michael Brown
Del Ray Citizen's Association
P.O. Box 2233
Alexandria, VA 22301
703- 684- 8164

Jim McCarthy
Auburn Village Condominium Association
24-A Auburn Court
Alexandria, VA 22305
703- 739- 0593

Ruby Tucker
Lynhaven Civic Association
254 Lynhaven Drive
Alexandria, VA 22305
703-549- 7754

Glenda Davis
Hume Springs Citizen Association
3732 Edison Street
Alexandria, VA 22305
703- 548- 8225

Duane Shields
Mt. Jefferson Civic Association
324 East Clifford Avenue
Alexandria, VA 22305
703- 683- 0180

Elsie Thomas
Sunnyside Neighborhood Association
3843 Elbert Avenue
Alexandria, VA 22305
703- 836-4653

Duane Anderson
Warwick Village Citizen's Association
P.O. Box 5003
Alexandria, VA 22305
703- 836- 1455

Collette Capara
Rosemont Citizen's Association
12 East Maple Street
Alexandria, VA 22301 703-739- 0548

Dan Sealy
National Park Service
George Washington Memorial Parkway
c/o Turkey Run Park
McLean, VA 22101
703- 285-2600

George O'Reilly
BCI/Protocol
5160 Heatherstone Drive, Suite 210
Chantilly, VA 22021
703- 631- 8402

Ron Carrol
Enterprise School
1629 Bueller Road
Vienna, VA 22182-2232
703- 281-2232

Martin R. Kurtovich
U.S. Department of Energy
EM-20 FORS
Washington, DC 20585
202- 586-5213

Alexandria Convention and Visitor's Bureau
221 King Street
Alexandria, VA 22314
703-838- 4200

APPENDIX B: Public Meeting Location and Stenographic Information

Public Meeting Location

George Washington Middle School
1005 Mt. Vernon Avenue
Alexandria, VA 22301

Contacts

Mr. Joseph Powlus, School Principal
703-706-4500

Ms. Georgia Brown
Alexandria School Board
200 North Beauregard Street
Alexandria, VA 22311
703-824-6688

Resources

Auditorium, classrooms, tables, chairs, air conditioning, podium, and restrooms are available. The building is accessible to the handicapped.

Stenographic Information

AA Beta Court Reporting
910 17th Street NW
Suite 200
Washington, DC 20006

Contact

Natasha
703-684-2382
Court Reporting Services Inc.
201 North Fairfax Street
Suite 21
Alexandria, VA 22314

Contact

John or Jay
703-548-3334
American Reporters
7611 Springfield Hill Drive
Springfield, VA 22153

Contact

Sandra
703-644-763

APPENDIX C: Information Repositories

Information Repositories

Alexandria Public Library
Burke Branch
4701 Seminary Road
Alexandria, VA

Contact: 703-370-6050
Hours: Monday to Thursday, 9:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m.
Friday, 9:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.
Saturday, 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Alexandria Public Library
Barrett Branch
717 Queen Street
Alexandria, VA

Contact: 703-838-4555
Hours: Monday to Thursday, 9:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m.
Friday, 9:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.
Saturday, 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Sunday, 1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Arlington County Library
Aurora Hills Branch
735 18th Street South
Alexandria, VA

Contact: 703-358-5715
Hours: Monday, 10:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m.
Tuesday and Wednesday, 1:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.
Thursday, 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.
Friday and Saturday, 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Sunday, 1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.

APPENDIX D: Glossary of Technical Terms

Action Memorandum
The document which identifies EPA's selection of a removal action or alternative under the Superfund Accelerated Cleanup Model. The Action Memorandum is released after EPA holds a public comment period on the alternatives listed in the Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis document.
Administrative Record
The official file containing the investigations, studies, and other Site-related documents which provide the basis for EPA's selection of a cleanup alternative at a Superfund site.
Cleanup
An action taken to deal with a release or threatened release of hazardous substances that could adversely affect public health and/or the environment. The word "cleanup" is used to refer to both short-term (removal) actions and long-term (remedial response) actions at Superfund sites.
Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA):
A federal law (commonly known as "Superfund") passed in 1980 and modified in 1986 by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA). The law gave EPA the authority to investigate sites where there is a suspected threat to public health or the environment caused by the release or potential release of hazardous substances. The law also created a special tax on the chemical and petroleum industries. Monies collected under the tax are deposited into a trust fund to be used to clean up abandoned or uncontrolled waste sites. Under the law, EPA can: pay for the site cleanup when the parties responsible for contamination cannot be located or are unwilling or unable to perform the cleanup, or take legal action to force parties responsible for site contamination to clean up the site or pay back the federal government for the cost of the cleanup.
CERCLIS (Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Information System):
EPA's comprehensive database and management system that inventories and tracks releases addressed or needing to be addressed by the Superfund program. CERCLIS contains the official inventory of CERCLA Sites and supports EPA's site planning and tracking functions.
Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis (EE/CA):
An evaluation and analysis conducted under the Superfund Accelerated Cleanup Model to look at alternative technologies available to address contamination at a Superfund site.
Extent of Contamination Study (ECS):
A study which identifies the type and amount of contamination at a Superfund Site and includes a description and summary of the data collected from the study.
Groundwater
Fresh water that fills in gaps between soil, sand, and gravel that is underground. Groundwater can be a major source of drinking water.
Information Repository
A collection of documents about a specific Superfund site and the general Superfund process. EPA usually sets up the information repository in a public building that is conveniently located, accessible to the handicapped, and contains a photocopying machine.
National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP):
The federal regulation that guides the Superfund program. The NCP was revised in 1990.
National Priorities List (NPL):
EPA's list of the nation's most serious uncontrolled or abandoned hazardous waste sites identified for possible long-term cleanup using Superfund money. EPA updates the NPL at least once a year.
Public Comment Period
A period during which the public can formally review and comment on various documents and EPA actions. For example, EPA holds a public comment period when it proposes to add sites to the National Priorities List. EPA also holds a minimum 30-day public comment period to enable community members to review and comment on a Proposed Plan.
Removal Action
An immediate, short-term cleanup action to address a release or threatened release of hazardous substances. This action is initiated to reduce or eliminate an immediate threat to public health and/or the environment.
Responsiveness Summary
A summary of oral and written comments (and EPA responses to those comments) which EPA receives during the public comment period. The Responsiveness Summary is part of the Record of Decision.
Superfund
The program operated under the legislative authority of the CERCLA and SARA to update and improve environmental laws. The program has the authority to respond to releases or threatened releases of hazardous substances that may endanger public health, welfare, or the environment. The "Superfund" is a trust fund that finances cleanup actions at hazardous waste sites.
Superfund Accelerated Cleanup Model (SACM)
A streamlined process developed by EPA to make Superfund site cleanups more timely and efficient. The SACM combines early actions, to address threats to human health and the environment, with ongoing studies of contamination to plan long-term cleanup actions at a Superfund site.
Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA):
Modifications to CERCLA enacted on October 17, 1986.
Surface Water
Ponds, lakes, rivers, and other bodies of water naturally open to the atmosphere.
Technical Assistance Grant (TAG):
An EPA grant of up to $50,000 which can be awarded to a bona fide citizens group in a Superfund site area. The grant enables that group to hire a technical expert to review and interpret site reports issued by EPA or other parties.

APPENDIX E: Technical Assistance Grant Information

EPA provides Technical Assistance Grants (TAGs) of up to $50,000 as part of its Superfund community relations program. The Technical Assistance Grant program enables citizens in a site area to hire a technical expert to review and interpret Site reports generated by EPA or other parties. Complete information on Technical Assistance Grants is contained in an EPA document titled The Citizens' Guidance Manual for the Technical Assistance Grant Program. This document is available at the local information repository designated in Appendix C of this Community Relations Plan. For additional information on how to apply for a Technical Assistance Grant, contact:

Lisa Brown (3HW43)
Community Involvement Coordinator
U. S. EPA Region III
1650 Arch St
Philadelphia, PA 19103-2029
800-553-2509 or 215-814-5528
brown.lisa@epa.gov

EPA accepts applications for Technical Assistance Grants as mandated by the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act. Only one group per site can receive a Technical Assistance Grant, so EPA urges local groups to join together to apply.

The following are Federal publications on the Technical Assistance Grant program which can be obtained by calling EPA's publications number: 800-553-6847.

Resource Distribution for the Technical Assistance Grant Program
Order No. PB90-249459/CCE
Superfund Technical Assistance Grant Brochure
Order No. PB90-273772/CCE
Superfund Technical Assistance Grant Handbook
Order No. PB91-238592/CCE
Update: Superfund Technical Assistance Grants
Order No. PB90-273715/CCE

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