Jump to main content .

Contact Us

Chesapeake Bay TMDL

Getting it Done

Chesapeake Bay TMDL Quick Finder

Water Protection HomeChesapeake Bay TMDL Home Creating the TMDL Contact UsBay TMDL and Executive Summary Frequent Questions Getting it DoneHow Does it Work? Ensuring Results Partner Links Press Room Watershed Implementation PlansSubscribe to Recent Chesapeake Bay TMDL NewsSubscribe to Recent News
  • Overview
  • Federal
  • State
  • Local Matters
  • Guidance & Resources

Read how the Bay Jurisdictions are Improving Local Waters & the Bay

District of Columbia | Delaware | Maryland | New York | Pennsylvania |
Virginia | West Virginia

How it works

The Northern Puffer Fish visits the Chesapeake Bay from spring through autumn. They are more common in the lower Bay, but do travel as far north as Love Point on Kent Island. Puffers are bottom-dwelling fish, common in the Bay's flats and channel margins. In the winter, northern puffers leave the Bay for deep offshore waters.  With permission from the Chesapeake Bay Program.

The PDF links on this page can be viewed with the Adobe PDF reader.
About PDF

A New Era of Federal Leadership

Executive Order 13508 in 2009, ushered in a new era of federal leadership, action and accountability in protecting and restoring the Chesapeake Bay and its watersheds. As required, federal agencies in May 2010 completed development of a comprehensive Executive Order strategy to guide implementation actions.

Examples of Actions in the Bay restoration by Federal Agencies

  • District of Columbia
  • Delaware
  • Maryland
  • New York
  • Pennsylvania
  • Virginia
  • West Virginia
Exit EPA Click for Disclaimer Some links on this page lead to non-EPA sites.

District of Columbia

Making Progress
Waters in the District of Columbia
District of Columbia
DC Works with Feds to Collect Data -- The District of Columbia coordinated with nine federal agencies to obtain updated mapping and planning data (GIS files) and also developed nutrient and sediment pollution reduction levels for agencies located in the District. Read more...

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Exit EPA Click for Disclaimer Some links on this page lead to non-EPA sites.

Delaware

Making Progress
Delaware watersheds
Nanticoke River, Seaford, Delaware
with permission, Delaware State
Pilot Project Focuses on Ag StructuresThe Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control (DNREC), in coordination with local conservation districts, is piloting a project to develop construction site stormwater management plans for conservation district cooperators that are planning to construct agricultural structures. Construction of agricultural structures where the disturbance exceeds 1.0 acre, which is not uncommon in Delaware with the construction of poultry houses and ancillary structures, requires a Sediment and Stormwater Plan to gain coverage under the state’s NPDES Construction General Permit. This pilot project uses the expertise of the conservation districts in both the agricultural and urban programs to assist local landowners in meeting permitting requirements and preventing a discharge of sediment during construction in a cost effective manner.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Exit EPA Click for Disclaimer Some links on this page lead to non-EPA sites.

Maryland

Making Progress
Bridges Havre de Grace, MD
Bridges Havre de Grace, MD
with permission Chesapeake Bay Program
Legislation Approved to Support Environment — Maryland’s water quality was a big winner in the 2012 General Assembly session that ended April 9, 2012. Legislation passed to encourage sustainable communities and reduce pollution. Read more ...

Exit EPA Click for Disclaimer Some links on this page lead to non-EPA sites.

New York

Making Progress
Maryland watersheds
Tioga River, Steuben County, NY photo credit Upper Susquehanna Coalition
Fertilizer Provision Effective Jan. 1 — A provision in New York’s Dishwasher Detergent and Nutrient Runoff Law will largely prohibit the use of phosphorus fertilizers for lawns and non-agricultural turf. The provision, which goes into effect on Jan. 1, 2012, contains exceptions for new lawns or when a test shows an existing lawn has too little phosphorus. It is part of the broader July 2010 law that prohibited the sale of newly-stocked, phosphorus-containing dishwasher detergents for household use. The fertilizer provision does not affect agriculture or gardens.
Read more...

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Exit EPA Click for Disclaimer Some links on this page lead to non-EPA sites.

Pennsylvania

Making Progress
Pennsylvania waterways
Pennsylvania Waterways
Stormwater Permit Published in October 2011 —The EPA-approved National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Stormwater Discharges from Small Municipal Separate Storm Sewer Systems (MS4s) General Permit (PAG-13) was published on October 17, 2011. The revised permit includes requirements for Chesapeake Bay Pollutant Reduction Plans. Pennsylvania committed in the final Phase II WIP to issue guidance and provide training for communities on how to develop the Chesapeake Bay Pollutant Reduction Plans to meet water quality goals. Read more ...

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Exit EPA Click for Disclaimer Some links on this page lead to non-EPA sites.

Virginia

Making Progress
Agricultural lands in Virginia
Agricultural Lands in Virginia
Permit Takes Effect — A revised Chesapeake Bay Watershed General Permit with nitrogen and phosphorus limits in conformance with Virginia’s WIP and the Chesapeake Bay TMDL took effect on Jan. 1, 2012.  This action continues Virginia’s significant progress in controlling nutrient from wastewater treatment discharges that began in 2006 when the first general permit was issued establishing loading caps on nutrient discharges in each of Virginia’s Chesapeake Bay tributaries.     Read more ...

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Exit EPA Click for Disclaimer Some links on this page lead to non-EPA sites.

West Virginia

Making Progress
West Virginia waterways
Moorefield Wastewater Treatment Plant, West Virginia

Treatment Plant Key to W.V. Pollution Reductions — The $40 million Moorefield Regional Wastewater Treatment Plant now under construction and expected to open in October 2013 represents a major step in West Virginia’s commitment to help restore the Chesapeake Bay and local waters. Lucas Gagnon, Town of Moorefield Public Works Director, stated, “Not only will we be making significant strides in meeting WV’s TMDL, we will also be improving local water quality. At start up, this plant will reduce total nitrogen loading by 90,000 pounds per year and total phosphorus by 93,000 pounds per year” – a healthy percentage of the state’s 2017 and 2025 pollution reduction commitments.

Read more:

 

 

 

 

 

 


Read About Local Governments

Local Government Advisory Committee, LGAC

Green Infrastructure in the Bay Watershed

Mid-Atlantic Water Division Home | Mid-Atlantic Topics A-Z

Jump to main content.