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  • District of Columbia
  • Delaware
  • Maryland
  • New York
  • Pennsylvania
  • Virginia
  • West Virginia
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District of Columbia

Making Progress
Waters in the District of Columbia
District of Columbia
DC Works with Feds to Collect Data -- The District of Columbia coordinated with nine federal agencies to obtain updated mapping and planning data (GIS files) and also developed nutrient and sediment pollution reduction levels for agencies located in the District. Read more...
  • More Highlights
    • Phase II WIP Reflects Agencies’ Commitments -- The District's Final Phase II Watershed Implementation Plan and 2012-2013 milestones reflect commitments by federal agencies to achieve required pollution reductions, commitments by General Services Administration to install green roofs, and bio-retention on new facilities being developed at the St. Elizabeth's site. Other commitments include a National Park Service commitment to install riparian and forest buffers on park land in the District. Read more...

    • DC Making Wise Investment in RiverSmart Homes -- RiverSmart Homes, a District-wide program, is offering incentives to homeowners interested in reducing stormwater runoff from their properties. Homeowners receive up to $1,200 to adopt one or more of the following landscape enhancements: shade trees, rain barrels, pervious pavers, rain gardens and BayScaping. Read more...

    • Joint Plan to Track Progress -- The District Department of the Environment and EPA are developing a plan for additional training for federal agencies as well as tracking and reporting of federal actions. Read more...

    • DC Implementing Plan to Cut CSOs by 96% -- The District of Columbia Water and Sewer Authority (DC Water) is implementing its Long Term Control Plan (LTCP) for the District's combined sewer overflows (CSOs) to Rock Creek and the Anacostia and Potomac rivers for treatment at DC Water's Blue Plains Advanced Wastewater Treatment Plant. The entire project is expected to reduce CSOs annually by 96% throughout the system and by 98% for the Anacostia River alone. Read more...

    • DC Water Breaks Ground on Tunnels Project — The District of Columbia Water and Sewer Authority (DC Water) broke ground on Oct. 12, 2011 on the $2.6 million Clean Rivers Project – a series of massive underground tunnels and diversion sewers that will nearly eliminate combined sewer overflows to the Anacostia and Potomac rivers and Rock Creek, and improve the health of the Chesapeake Bay. Read more...

  • Visit the District's website to learn more about their TMDL efforts in the Chesapeake Bay.

  • Contact the District's Watershed Implementation Plan Coordinators (PDF) (3pg, 133K).
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Delaware

Making Progress
Delaware watersheds
Nanticoke River, Seaford, Delaware
with permission, Delaware State
Pilot Project Focuses on Ag StructuresThe Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control (DNREC), in coordination with local conservation districts, is piloting a project to develop construction site stormwater management plans for conservation district cooperators that are planning to construct agricultural structures. Construction of agricultural structures where the disturbance exceeds 1.0 acre, which is not uncommon in Delaware with the construction of poultry houses and ancillary structures, requires a Sediment and Stormwater Plan to gain coverage under the state’s NPDES Construction General Permit. This pilot project uses the expertise of the conservation districts in both the agricultural and urban programs to assist local landowners in meeting permitting requirements and preventing a discharge of sediment during construction in a cost effective manner.

 

 

 

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Maryland

Making Progress
Bridges, Havre de Grace, MD
Bridges Havre de Grace, MD
with permission Chesapeake Bay Program
Legislation Approved to Support Environment — Maryland’s water quality was a big winner in the 2012 General Assembly session that ended April 9, 2012. Legislation passed to encourage sustainable communities and reduce pollution. Read more ...
  • More Highlights
    • New Proposed Regulation for Septic Systems — The Maryland Department of the Environment (MDE) proposed a new regulation April 27, 2012 to require nitrogen-removal technology for all septic systems serving new construction on land draining to the Chesapeake Bay and Atlantic Coastal Bays or in other areas where bodies of water are impaired by nitrogen. Existing regulations require nitrogen removal technology for all new and replacement septic systems in the Critical Area. Read more ...

    • Plant Upgrade Funding Approved — On Jan. 4, 2012, the Maryland Board of Public Works approved more than $19 million in grants to reduce pollution and improve water quality by upgrading technology at wastewater treatment plants.  "Project such as these are an important part of our effort to improve Maryland waterways, including the Chesapeake Bay," said Lieutenant Governor Anthony G. Brown. Read more ...

    • Maryland/Delaware Wastewater Treatment Plant Unveiled — A new state-of-the-art wastewater treatment facility straddling the border of Maryland and Delaware will provide significant clean water benefits for the Chesapeake Bay watershed. The facility was unveiled at a ceremony on Dec. 20, 2011. The plant was upgraded to include the addition of biological and enhanced nutrient removal systems that effectively reduce nitrogen and phosphorus loadings entering waterways that drain into the Chesapeake Bay.   Read more ...

    • Maryland Approves Funding to Reduce Pollution — The Maryland Board of Public Works has approved nearly $8 million in grants to reduce pollution, improve water quality and protect drinking water by upgrading a wastewater treatment plant, a drinking water reservoir and a stormwater management facility. “Projects such as these are an important part of our effort to improve Maryland waterways, including the Chesapeake Bay,” said Governor Martin O’Malley. “These projects reduce pollution and protect public health while creating jobs for more Marylanders.” Read more ...

    • Governor Signs Legislation to Limit Fertilizer Use — Maryland Governor Martin O’Malley in May 2011 signed legislation that will reduce pollution from lawn fertilizer applied to homes, golf courses and businesses. The Chesapeake Bay Commission, whose members introduced the legislation, estimates that the Fertilizer Use Act of 2011 will reduce phosphorus pollution from urban sources by 15% compared to 2009 levels. This equates to 20% of the phosphorus reduction Maryland needs to achieve its pollution reduction goals for the Chesapeake Bay TMDL. Read more...

    • Maryland Farmers Plant Record Acreage of Cover Crops — Maryland farmers planted nearly 430,000 acres of cover crops in fall 2011 through the state’s Cover Crop Program, the largest planting in Maryland history, according to the Maryland Department of Agriculture (MDA). The 2011 figure exceeds Maryland’s 2013 Chesapeake Bay pollution reduction milestone for cover crop plantings by 21 percent. Read more...

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New York

Making Progress
Maryland watersheds
Tioga River, Steuben County, NY photo credit Upper Susquehanna Coalition
Fertilizer Provision Effective Jan. 1 — A provision in New York’s Dishwasher Detergent and Nutrient Runoff Law will largely prohibit the use of phosphorus fertilizers for lawns and non-agricultural turf. The provision, which goes into effect on Jan. 1, 2012, contains exceptions for new lawns or when a test shows an existing lawn has too little phosphorus. It is part of the broader July 2010 law that prohibited the sale of newly-stocked, phosphorus-containing dishwasher detergents for household use. Less phosphorus used means less phosphorus in wastewater and stormwater runoff, which improves water quality, reduces water treatment costs, and provides better opportunities for recreational uses of waterbodies. Read more...

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Pennsylvania

Making Progress
Pennsylvania watersheds
Pennsylvania Waterways
Stormwater Permit Published in October 2011 —The EPA-approved National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Stormwater Discharges from Small Municipal Separate Storm Sewer Systems (MS4s) General Permit (PAG-13) was published on October 17, 2011. The revised permit includes requirements for Chesapeake Bay Pollutant Reduction Plans. Pennsylvania committed in the final Phase II WIP to issue guidance and provide training for communities on how to develop the Chesapeake Bay Pollutant Reduction Plans to meet water quality goals. Read more ...
  • More Highlights
    • Improving Watersheds: Mill Creek —Another major reach of the Mill Creek watershed in Lancaster County recently has been restored through a Section 319 grant with the Lancaster County Conservation District (LCCD). The Mill Creek Stream Restoration Phase I project was completed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and local contractors in late summer 2010. This stream reach flows through three farms adjoining the main stem of Mill Creek near where Muddy Run meets the Mill Creek main stem. Approximately 3,300 linear feet of stream channel were restored using rock veins, deflectors and mud sills. Over 6,000 feet of stream bank stabilization was completed by regrading banks, improving livestock access and constructing stream bank fencing. Riparian forest buffers will be planted along the restored reach. DEP worked with LCCD to use a 35-foot minimum buffer width for all 319-funded riparian forest buffer plantings. Landowners will be required to maintain riparian buffers with assistance from the LCCD and a local watershed group. Annual sediment load reductions for Phase I are estimated to be approximately 1,262 tons/year. The main stem and tributaries are on the impaired water list for sediment and nutrients, and the project sites addressed in Phase I are included in the Mill Creek Watershed Implementation Plan (WIP). With the completion of Phase I, over a one-mile continuous stretch of the Mill Creek main stem has been restored. Phase II of the project is included in Pennsylvania’s FFY2010 Section 319 NPS Program grant. Read more...

    • Manual Provides Guidelines on Animal Manures, Ag Process Wastewater —The Manure Management Manual for Environmental Protection and its supplements provide guidelines that comply with Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection regulations concerning animal manures and agricultural process wastewaters. The criteria established in this manual are required to be followed by all operations applying manure or agricultural process wastewater, farms that pasture animals and farms managing an Animal Concentration Area (ACA) unless the operators obtain a permit or approval from DEP to implement alternative practices. The provisions of this Land Application of Manure Supplement work together with the Agricultural Erosion and Sediment Control Plan required for agricultural plowing and tilling and managing Animal Heavy Use Areas (also known as Animal Concentration Areas). Certain sections of information developed using this manual can be used as part of the Agricultural Erosion and Sediment Control Plan. Concentrated Animal Operations (CAOs) under the Nutrient and Odor Management Act Regulations, and Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations (CAFOs) under Pennsylvania’s National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) CAFO program must follow requirements different from those found in this manual. Read more...

    • Revised Regulation in Place for Erosion and Sedimentation (E&S) and Post Construction Stormwater Management (PCSM) (Chapter 102) — Revisions to the current regulation became effective on November 19, 2010. The revisions codify PCSM requirements. For example, they require long-term operation and maintenance of PCSM best management practices; include antidegradation implementation provisions for PCSM; update agricultural planning and implementation requirements for animal heavy use areas; and establish requirements for riparian buffer and riparian forest buffer provisions in High Quality (HQ) and Exceptional Value (EV) watersheds. Read more...

    • Nutrient Credit Trading Program Progresses — Auctions in November 2011 for the sale and purchase of nutrient credits in the Susquehanna and Potomac watersheds reflect the latest steps in Pennsylvania’s nutrient credit trading program. The program is designed to provide cost-effective options for reducing pollution to local waters and the Chesapeake Bay. Read more...

    • Manure Treatment Project HighlightedAn innovative manure treatment project on a Lancaster County farm will help reduce nutrient runoff into the Chesapeake Bay as part of Pennsylvania’s continuing efforts to improve the bay’s health, according to a July 2011 Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture press release. Kreider Farms, a 2,200-cow dairy in Mount Joy, Lancaster County, unveiled a micro-aerobic digestion project that provides on-farm treatment of manure. Read more...

  • Visit Pennsylvania's website to learn more about their TMDL efforts in the Chesapeake Bay.

  • Contact Pennsylvania's Watershed Implementation Plan Coordinators (PDF) (3pg, 133K).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Virginia

Making Progress
Virginia waterways
Agricultural Lands in Virginia
Permit Takes Effect — A revised Chesapeake Bay Watershed General Permit with nitrogen and phosphorus limits in conformance with Virginia’s WIP and the Chesapeake Bay TMDL took effect on Jan. 1, 2012.  This action continues Virginia’s significant progress in controlling nutrient from wastewater treatment discharges that began in 2006 when the first general permit was issued establishing loading caps on nutrient discharges in each of Virginia’s Chesapeake Bay tributaries.     Read more ...
  • More Highlights
    • Legislation Advances to Curb Nutrients — During the 2011 session, the Virginia General Assembly passed House Bill (HB) 1831 that advances many of the strategies identified in Virginia’s Phase I WIP to reduce the nutrients used in the urban setting. The legislation includes, among other provisions, a prohibition on the sale, distribution and use of general lawn maintenance fertilizer containing phosphorus effective December 2013. Several manufacturers have already implemented the formulation changes, making phosphorus free lawn fertilizers available in may retail stores.Read more ...

    • Assembly Acts on Ag Plans — The Virginia General Assembly passed legislation to develop regulations for agricultural Resource Management Plans (RMPs). Final regulations are expected to be completed in late 2012 and implemented in early 2013. The regulations, as proposed in Virginia’s Phase I WIP, provide criteria for the development of RMPs, a suite of agricultural Best Management Practices (BMPs) that will help the landowner meet pollution reduction goals. The RMP regulations, though voluntary, provide an incentive to farmers who utilize agricultural BMPs in that they will receive a "safe harbor" from future mandatory requirements related to the Chesapeake Bay TMDL. Read more ...

    • Nutrient Credit Framework Established — As called for in Virginia’s Phase I WIP, the Secretary of Natural Resources oversaw a comprehensive study of the use of nutrient credits and recommended an expanded framework in a January 2012 report. As a result, bills passed the General Assembly and were signed by the Governor to implement the framework. The legislation, when fully implemented, will add additional flexibility and cost-effectiveness in meeting and maintaining nutrient reductions. Read more ...

    • Governor Signs Environmental Stewardship Legislation — Governor Bob McDonnell in August 2011 signed eight pieces of environmental stewardship legislation that will help Virginia’s agriculture industry grow and thrive while also enhancing water quality in the Chesapeake Bay and other Virginia watersheds. Read more ...

    • Virginia Providing Planning Assistance — The Department of Conservation and Recreation (DCR) is making grant funding available in support of the Chesapeake Bay Watershed Implementation Phase II planning efforts. Chesapeake Bay Watershed Model information and planning targets have been provided to localities in all planning district commission areas. The state funds can be used to review the model information, compare it with data on those best management practices (BMPs) that currently exist and to identify BMP implementation scenarios and local strategies to reduce pollutant loads. Funding is available to regional planning district commissions, soil and water conservation districts and local government entities throughout Virginia’s Chesapeake Bay Watershed. Read more...

    • VAST Assistance Available —A new tool is available in Virginia to help localities and others plan strategies for meeting the Chesapeake Bay pollution diet. The Virginia Assessment and Scenario Tool (VAST) will assist in taking existing land use and best management practice data and developing local nutrient reduction scenarios. These scenarios will help inform Virginia’s Phase II Watershed Implementation Plans. The Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation has made training available for those interested in using the VAST system. Read more...

  • Visit Virginia's website to learn more about their TMDL efforts in the Chesapeake Bay.

  • Contact Virginia's Watershed Implementation Plan Coordinators (PDF) (3pg, 133K).

 

 

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West Virginia

Making Progress
West Virginia waterways
Moorefield Wastewater Treatment Plant, West Virginia 
Treatment Plant Key to W.V. Pollution Reductions — The $40 million Moorefield Regional Wastewater Treatment Plant now under construction and expected to open in October 2013 represents a major step in West Virginia’s commitment to help restore the Chesapeake Bay and local waters. Lucas Gagnon, Town of Moorefield Public Works Director, stated, “Not only will we be making significant strides in meeting WV’s TMDL, we will also be improving local water quality. At start up, this plant will reduce total nitrogen loading by 90,000 pounds per year and total phosphorus by 93,000 pounds per year” – a healthy percentage of the state’s 2017 and 2025 pollution reduction commitments. Read more...
  • More Highlights
    • Tree Planting Grows in West Virginia — West Virginia's Department of Forestry and the Cacapon Institute received a three-year US Department of Agriculture-Forest Service (USDA-FS) grant for UTC assessment and implementation of Urban Tree Canopy Initiatives throughout the Potomac Headwaters. Project CommuniTree (CTree), promotes tree planting and education on public lands through volunteerism. A total of 444 trees were planted that will ultimately result in approximately 4 acres of new urban canopy. Grantees agree to maintain these plantings to help ensure their success. Read more...
    • Workshop Focuses on Construction A two-day stormwater/ sediment and erosion workshop was held in cooperation with West Virginia Division of Highways (DOH) in 2011 and focused on construction. Over 80 inspectors, engineers and private contractors participated. The focus was on construction National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System and US Army Corps of Engineers permits as well as the upcoming turbidity measurement and effluent limit compliance standards. On-site demonstrations were held along the most recent section of highway construction and showcased some of the newest applications in stormwater management. In addition, two rain gardens were installed at DOH facilities as demonstrations to manage stormwater and educate the public. Read more...

    • WV Boosts Nutrient Management Actions — The West Virginia Department of Agriculture has greatly increased its Nutrient Management Planning activities. The Department currently has five full-time-equivalent positions on staff available to write Nutrient Management Plans throughout the Eastern Panhandle. During this past legislative session, West Virginia’s nutrient management program was codified. Although 2011 progress shows fewer acres of nutrient management plans than in recent years, this reflects the adoption of a better, more accurate method of tracking these three-year plans that necessitated a temporary drop in reported acres. Over the next three years, the acreage under Nutrient Management Plans is expected to increase dramatically and remain at high levels thereafter. Nutrient Management brochures have been published and handed out at many county fairs and other outreach events throughout the Panhandle counties. Staff has been available to promote and explain the Nutrient Management planning process, which includes free soil sampling and analysis, free planning services, more efficient utilization of nutrients, and identification of Best Management Practices all resulting in better environmental stewardship. Read more...

    • Treatment Plant to Help Reduce Pollution — The Frankfort Public Service District wastewater treatment plant in Mineral County was constructed to replace nine smaller wastewater treatment plants and to meet the Chesapeake Bay TMDL wasteload allocation of 5 mg/l nitrogen and 0.5 mg/l phosphorus. Performance will be documented in West Virginia's 2012 - 2013 milestones. The new plant serves over 1,400 customers, and replaces 80 septic systems. A second phase of the project will pick up 250 septic systems.Read more...

    • West Virginia Issues Model Stormwater Ordinance — West Virginia's Stormwater Strategy for the Potomac Basin outlined short-term objectives to build capacity for better stormwater management. Several of these were achieved in the spring of 2011, when a Model Stormwater Ordinance was released for consideration by local governments within West Virginia's Eastern Panhandle (Berkeley, Jefferson, and Morgan counties). Read more...

    • West Virginia to Fund Upgrades with Excess Lottery Funds — West Virginia will invest $6 million annually for 30 years toward wastewater treatment plant upgrades that will reduce nutrient pollution to the Potomac River and the Chesapeake Bay. The money, which will come from excess state lottery funds, will fund about $85 milliion in bonds that will help pay for upgrades. The funding will cover about 40 percent of the expected cost for the upgrades. The upgrades will help West Virginia meet new pollution-reduction goals that are part of the “pollution diet” for the Chesapeake Bay and its rivers. West Virginia has 13 wastewater facilities that need to be upgraded to meet nutrient limits. Facility upgrades have already begun in Charles Town, Shepherdstown and the Frankfort Public Service District. Read more...

    • Initiative Helps Farms, Improves Water Quality — West Virginia’s Agriculture Enhancement Program is helping to increase farm productivity and improve water quality. The initiative, developed by the Eastern Panhandle Conservation District, provides tools for farmers to take actions that will boost farm productivity and sustainability and contribute to efforts to restore local streams and creeks and the Chesapeake Bay. The program offers technical and cost-share assistance as an incentive to implement selected best management practices. Read more...

  • Visit West Virginia's website to learn more about their TMDL efforts in the Chesapeake Bay.

  • Contact West Virginia's Watershed Implementation Plan Coordinators (PDF) (3pg, 133K).

 

 

 

 

 


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