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Clean Air Act Self-Assessment Tools

The Clean Air Act (CAA) is the comprehensive Federal law that regulates air emissions from area, stationary, and mobile sources. This law authorizes EPA to establish National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) to protect public health and the environment. It also established programs to address smog, acid rain, stratospheric ozone protection, and air toxics. Federal CAA regulations are set forth in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) at 40 CFR Part 50-99. Below are available checklists and audit protocols that can help organizations determine their compliance with the CAA. 

NOTE: Some documents below are Adobe Acrobat PDF files. Click on the headings to view documents according to their respective details.

 

Air Toxics

Chrome Sources Inspection Guidance and Checklists - This guidance document and checklist were created by the Environmental Protection Agency to help air inspectors conduct inspections at chromium electroplating and chromium anodizing facilities to determine their compliance with 40 CFR Part 63 Subpart N.

Inspection Checklist for the Pharmaceuticals MACT Standard (40 CFR Part 63)  The United State Environmental Protection Agency designed this checklist in September of 2001 as a compliance tool and/or a guidance document to be used by USEPA, State and Local agency inspectors, as well as the pharmaceutical industry, for the purposes of a facility compliance inspection or a self audit.

Inspection Checklist for the Off-site Waste and Recovery Operations MACT Standard (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart DD) This checklist was designed by the United States Environmental Protection Agency in June of 2001 to assist agency inspectors (Federal, State, Local, Tribal and others) as well as facility owners, operators and responsible employees to investigate and/or monitor compliance with the Off-Site Waste and Recovery Operations MACT (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart DD).
 
Inspection Checklist for the Steel Pickling MACT Standard (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart CCC)  This checklist was designed by the United States Environmental Protection Agency in May of 2000 to assist agency inspectors (Federal, State, Local, Tribal and others) as well as facility owners, operators and responsible employees to investigate and/or monitor compliance with the Steel Pickling MACT Standard (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart CCC).

Ozone-Depleting Substances (e.g., CFCs)

Self-Audit Checklist: Industrial Process Refrigeration, Comfort Cooling, Commercial and other Refrigeration    - This checklist was created by EPA Region 2 to help facilities that repair, service, and dispose of air conditioning and refrigeration equipment as well as own air conditioning and refrigeration equipment containing more than 50 lbs of refrigerant to determine their compliance with the refrigerant recycling regulations under Section 608 of the Clean Air Act.
 
Self-Audit Checklist: Servicing of Small Appliances Containing Refrigerant  -
This checklist was created by EPA Region 2 to help facilities that service small appliances containing refrigerant to determine their compliance with the refrigerant recycling regulations under Section 608 of the Clean Air Act.
 
Self-Audit Checklist: Servicing Motor Vehicle Air Conditioners - This checklist was created by EPA Region 2 to help facilities that service motor vehicle air conditioners to determine their compliance with the refrigerant recycling regulations under Section 609 of the Clean Air Act.
 
Self-Assessment Checklist: Safe Disposal of Motor Vehicle Air Conditioners   This checklist was created by EPA Region 2 to help facilities that dispose of motor vehicle air conditioners to determine their compliance with the safe disposal requirements under Section 608 and Section 609 of the Clean Air Act.
 
Self-Assessment Checklist: Safe Disposal of Small Appliances Containing Refrigerant  This checklist was created by EPA Region 2 to help facilities that dispose of small appliances containing refrigerant to determine their compliance with the safe disposal requirements under Section 608 of the Clean Air Act.

 


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