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Environmental Requirements

Federal Agencies, just like the private sector, are required to comply with environmental requirements.  EPA's goal is for Federal facilities to lead by example and reach a level of compliance with environmental requirements that surpasses the rest of the regulated community. Toward that goal, EPA Region 2 created this site to provide links to available checklists, guidance documents, websites, hotlines, and other compliance assistance tools that were developed to help facilities comply with federal environmental requirements.  Please remember, however, that state and local governments may have stricter regulations than the federal government. Thus, for information on any applicable state and local environmental requirements, contact your state/local environmental agencies.

 

General (Multi- Statute)

 Clean Air Act

Clean Water Act

Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act

Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act

Endangered Species Act

Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act

National Environmental Policy Act

National Historical Preservation Act

Oil Pollution Act

Pollution Prevention Act

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act

Safe Drinking Water Act

Toxic Substances Control Act

Executive Orders

 

General (Multi-Statute)

FedSite is a centralized site for linking to information regarding compliance with environmental regulations. This site is sponsored by EPA's Federal Facilities Enforcement Office and builds upon existing sites and resources concerning many compliance and pollution prevention (P2) topics.

The Yellow Book: Guide to Environmental Enforcement and Compliance at Federal Facilities  provides individuals with Federal Facility environmental responsibilities with an informational tool to help comply with environmental requirements and to clearly explain the compliance and enforcement processes used by EPA and States at Federal Facilities. 

FedFacs is an environmental bulletin for federal facilities that is published periodically by EPA.

FedEnviroNews-Online is a free computerized, subscription-based information service operated by EPA that provides environmental news and information of interest to Federal Facilities. To subscribe, send an e-mail message to listserver@unixmail.rtpnc.epa.gov, leave the subject area blank, and in the body of the message write: subscribe FEDENVIRONEWS-ONLINE firstname lastname. Within 24 hours you should receive a welcome e-mail message indicating that you have been added to the subscriber list. 

EPA's Compliance Assistance Clearinghouse is your guide to compliance information on the Internet.  It  provides quick access to compliance tools, contacts, and planned activities from across EPA as well as other compliance assistance providers. 

e-CFR is a searchable Internet-based database of the Code of Federal Regulations.

Clean Air Act

The Clean Air Act (CAA) is the comprehensive Federal law that regulates air emissions from area, stationary, and mobile sources. This law authorizes EPA to establish National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) to protect public health and the environment.  It also established programs to address smog, acid rain, stratospheric ozone protection, and air toxics.  Federal CAA regulations are set forth in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) at 40 CFR Part 50-99.  Below are several compliance assistance tools that can help Federal facilities comply with these regulations:

EPA Region 2's Air Conditioning and Refrigeration Website provides information and guidance documents to help facilities comply with the refrigerant recycling regulations under EPA's Stratospheric Ozone Protection Program.

TTNWEB is a technology transfer network established by EPA's Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards and is EPA's premier technical website for air pollution information.  

EPA's Asbestos Web site provides information and resources to help facilities comply with the asbestos regulations under the Clean Air Act and the Toxic Substances Control Act.

EPA's Chemical Accident Prevention and Risk Management Programs Website provides information to help facilities comply with Section 112R of the Clean Air Act which established a program to prevent catastrophic and accidental releases of hazardous air pollutants

EPA RCRA, Superfund & EPCRA Call Center is a publicly accessible service that provides up-to-date information on several EPA programs, including Section 112R of the Clean Air Act, and responds to requests for relevant publications and information resources

Clean Water Act

The Clean Water Act (CWA) is the primary Federal Statute regulating the protection of the nation's waters. The CWA established national programs for prevention, reduction, and elimination of pollution in navigable water and groundwater, including a water quality standards program, a permit program for discharge and treatment of wastewater and stormwater, and an oil pollution prevention program.  Federal CWA regulations are set forth in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) at 40 CFR Parts 100-136, 140 Exit EPA disclaimer , 230-233, 401-471, and 501-503.  Below are several compliance assistance tools that can help Federal facilities comply with these regulations: 

EPA's NPDES Web site provides technical and regulatory information about the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit program which controls water pollution by regulating point sources (e.g. pipe, ditch) that discharge pollutants into waters of the United States. Please note that the stormwater program is part of the NPDES program and is designed to to prevent the discharge of contaminated stormwater into navigable waters.

EPA's Oil Spill Program Website provides information about the U.S. EPA's program for preventing, preparing for, and responding to oil spills that occur in and around inland waters of the United States.

EPA RCRA, Superfund & EPCRA Call Center is a publicly accessible service that provides up-to-date information on several EPA programs, including EPA's Oil Spill Program and responds to requests for relevant publications and information resources

Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act 

The Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), also known as Superfund, established requirements and procedures for the cleanup of closed and abandoned hazardous waste sites, provided for liability of persons responsible for releases of hazardous waste at these sites, and created a trust fund to provide for cleanup when no responsible party could be identified. It also contains provisions specifying when releases of hazardous substances must be reported.  Regulations addressing environmental cleanup and response are in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) at 40 CFR Parts 300-311, 355 Exit EPA disclaimer , and 373. Exit EPA disclaimer For more information on CERCLA, please visit our cleanup web site

Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know 

Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know (EPCRA), also known as Title III of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA), requires States to establish a process for developing local chemical emergency preparedness programs and to receive and disseminate information on hazardous chemicals present at facilities within local communities. EPCRA also requires EPA to establish a publicly available toxic chemical release inventory consisting of facility-specific chemical release and waste management information. The implementing regulations for EPCRA are found in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) in 40 CFR Parts 302 Exit EPA disclaimer, 355 Exit EPA disclaimer , 370 Exit EPA disclaimer , and  372 Exit EPA disclaimer . Below are several compliance assistance tools that can help Federal facilities comply with these regulations:

EPA's Toxic Release Inventory Web site provides a description of what TRI is, how TRI data can be accessed and used, and downloadable copies of TRI forms, reporting instructions, and guidance documents.

EPA RCRA, Superfund & EPCRA Call Center is a publicly accessible service that provides up-to-date information on several EPA programs and responds to requests for relevant publications and information resources

Chemical Emergency Preparedness Prevention Office Home Page  lists relevant fact sheets, regulations, and guidance documents relating to the EPCRA emergency planning, emergency release notification, and hazardous chemical inventory reporting requirements.

Free PDF reader available Protocol for Conducting Environmental Compliance Audits under the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (PDF-358K) was developed by EPA to provide guidance to regulated entities conducting a review of facility conditions to determine their compliance with EPCRA.

Endangered Species Act

The Endangered Species Act (ESA) provides a framework for the protection of endangered and threatened species. Federal agencies may not jeopardize the existence of listed species, which includes ensuring that actions they authorize, fund, or carry out do not adversely modify designated critical habitats. Under ESA, all Federal departments and agencies must utilize their authorities, as appropriate, to promote the recovery of listed species. In addition, ESA prohibits all persons, including Federal agencies, from harming or killing ("taking") individuals of listed animal species without authorization. While Federal agencies must consult with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service or National Marine Fisheries Service when their activities may affect listed species, projects cannot be stopped unilaterally by the services; however, for any anticipated "take" to be authorized, applicable measures to minimize the take that are developed in the consultation must be followed. For more information about ESA, please contact the  U.S. Fish and Wildlife Exit EPA disclaimer and the National Marine Fisheries Service Exit EPA disclaimer who share responsibility for administration of ESA. 

Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and  Rodenticide Act

The Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA) regulates the sale and use of pesticides in the United States. Before a pesticide can be sold or distributed in the United States, FIFRA requires that registration be obtained from EPA. When making a registration decision, EPA must determine that the pesticide, when used in accordance with label directions, will not cause unreasonable adverse effects to human health or the environment. The prime duty of the user it to comply with all use instructions on the pesticide label or accompanying labeling. Failure to follow label directions is dangerous and illegal.  Federal pesticide regulations are set forth in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) at 40 CFR Parts 150-189. Below are several compliance assistance tools that can help Federal facilities comply with these regulations:

EPA's Office of Pesticides Programs Home Page provides information and resources to help facilities comply with regulations regarding pesticide use and implement safer means of pest control. 

National Antimicrobial Information Network (NAIN) Exit EPA disclaimer is cooperative effort of Oregon State University and the US Environmental Protection Agency. NAIN helps callers determine permitted uses of products, supplies general information on the regulation of antimicrobials and lists of products registered with the EPA, provides safety, health and environmental information, and takes reports of lack of product efficacy and forwards this information to EPA. 

National Pesticide Telecommunications Network (NPTN) Exit EPA disclaimer is a cooperative effort of Oregon State University and the US Environmental Protection Agency. NPTN provides objective, science-based information about a variety of pesticide-related subjects, including pesticide products, recognition and management of pesticide poisonings, toxicology, and environmental chemistry. NPTN also lists state pesticide regulatory agencies, and provides links to their Web sites. For more information, read the NPTN Factsheet

.Free PDF reader available Protocol for Conducting Environmental Compliance Audits under the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA) (PDF-572K) was developed by EPA to provide guidance to regulated entities conducting a review of facility conditions to determine their compliance with FIFRA.

National Environmental Policy Act

The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) ensures that Federal agency decisionmaking takes environmental factors into consideration by requiring that an environmental impact statement be performed to consider the environmental effects of, and any alternatives to, all proposals for major Federal actions that significantly affect the quality of the human environment. NEPA is generally only applicable to Federal agencies and Federal actions; however, State, local, and private entities need to comply with NEPA when they are involved in Federal actions.  NEPA regulations are set forth in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) at 40 CFR Parts 1500-1508.  

National Historical Preservation Act

The National Historical Preservation Act (NHPA) preserves for public use historic and cultural sites of national significance by establishing an advisory council to help the government administer NHPA, the National Register of Historic places, and the National Trust for Historic Preservation.  The National Trust has authority to receive and administer donated funds and historic properties. Federal authority can be delegated to State Historic Preservation Office (SHPOs.) Agencies are required to appoint an agency preservation officer, preserve all historic properties they own or control, notify the Department of Interior (DOI) of projects that will cause the loss of significant historic materials, and request DOI preservation assistance.  For more information, contact the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation Exit EPA disclaimer

Oil Pollution Act of 1990

The Oil Pollution Act (OPA) of 1990, the principle Federal statute regulating oil pollution spills, strengthened EPA's ability to prevent and respond to catastrophic oil spills. OPA provides a mechanism for funding removal costs and seeking payment of damages associated with discharges of oil and increases liability for responsible parties. It also requires the development of National and Area Contingency Plans, a National Response Unit, Coast Guard District Response Groups, and specific tank vessel and facility response plans. Federal regulations addressing oil pollution are found in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) at 40 CFR Parts 110 Exit EPA disclaimer , 112 Exit EPA disclaimer , and 300 Exit EPA disclaimer subparts C, D, and E; 49 CFR Part 194 Exit EPA disclaimer ; and 33 CFR Part 154 Exit EPA disclaimer . Below are several compliance assistance tools that can help Federal facilities comply with these regulations:

EPA's Oil Spill Program Website provides information about the U.S. EPA's program for preventing, preparing for, and responding to oil spills that occur in and around inland waters of the United States.

EPA RCRA, Superfund & EPCRA Call Center is a publicly accessible service that provides up-to-date information on several EPA programs, including the Oil Spill program, and responds to requests for relevant publications and information resources

Department of Transportation's Office of Pipeline Safety Exit EPA disclaimer has responsibility for implementing the Oil Pollution Act of 1990 as it applies to onshore oil pipelines. The goal of their efforts is to decrease the likelihood of pipeline spills, diminish the environmental consequences of spills, and ensure that the responses to spills are swift and well planned.Please check out their Oil Pollution Act Exit EPA disclaimer and Regulations Exit EPA disclaimer pages for documents and information to help you comply with their regulations.

U.S. Coast Guard Marine Safety and Environmental Protection Web site provides documents and other information of general interest to the maritime community, including those related to oil spills.

Pollution Prevention Act

The Pollution Prevention Act of 1990 establishes pollution prevention as national policy in the United States by declaring that pollution should be prevented or reduced at the source wherever feasible, while pollution that cannot be prevented should be recycled in an environmentally safe manner. In the absence of feasible prevention or recycling opportunities, pollution should be treated: disposal or other release into the environment should be used as a last resort. EPA Region 2 developed a Pollution Prevention Web site to help facilities implement pollution prevention opportunities.  

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act

The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) provides "cradle-to-grave" control of solid and hazardous waste by establishing management requirements on generators and transporters of hazardous waste and on owners and operators of hazardous waste  treatment, storage, and disposal facilities. RCRA mainly applies to active facilities, although through Section 7003, it can address the serious problem of abandoned and inactive facilities. These abandoned facilities also may be covered under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act.  Federal RCRA regulations are set forth in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) at 40 CFR Parts 240-282.  Below are several compliance assistance tools that can help Federal facilities comply with these regulations:

EPA Region 2's Waste Program Website provides information and documents to help facilities comply with RCRA

RCRA On-line is designed to enable users to locate documents, including publications and other outreach materials, that cover a wide range of RCRA issues and topics.

EPA RCRA, Superfund & EPCRA Call Center is a publicly accessible service that provides up-to-date information on several EPA programs and responds to requests for relevant publications and information resources

EPA developed the following Audit Protocols to provide guidance to facilities who are conducting a review of their operations to determine compliance with RCRA. 

Free PDF reader available Protocol for Conducting Environmental Compliance Audits of Used Oil and Universal Waste Generators under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (PDF-1.4MB) 

Free PDF reader available Protocol for Conducting Environmental Compliance Audits of Storage Tanks under the Resource Conservation and
Recovery Act
(PDF-844K) 

Free PDF reader available Protocol for Conducting Environmental Compliance Audits of Facilities Regulated under Subtitle D of RCRA (PDF-610K)

Free PDF reader available Protocol for Conducting Environmental Compliance Audits of Hazardous Waste Generators under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (PDF-726K)

Free PDF reader available Protocol for Conducting Environmental Compliance Audits of Treatment Storage and Disposal Facilities under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (PDF-986K)

 

Safe Drinking Water Act

The Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) protects public drinking water systems from harmful contaminants and underground sources of drinking water from improper underground injection. It does this by directing EPA to set maximum contaminant levels for public water supply systems, establishing underground injection control and sole-source aquifer/wellhead protection programs, and prohibiting the use of lead pipes, solder, or flux in the installation and repair of any public water systems or any plumbing in a residential or nonresidential facility providing water for human consumption. Regulations addressing SDWA are found in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) at 40 CFR Parts 141-149. Below are several compliance assistance tools that can help Federal facilities comply with these regulations:

Safe Drinking Water Hotline provides up-to-date information on recently promulgated standards and regulations that have appeared in the Federal Register and answers questions concerning SDWA.

National Drinking Water Clearinghouse  is sponsored through the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Rural Utilities Service and provides technical assistance and information to America's small and rural drinking water systems. 

EPA Region 2's Drinking Water Homepage provides information on the various programs in Region 2 that are designed to protect drinking water.

EPA Region 2's Groundwater Homepage provides information on the various programs in Region 2 that are designed to protect groundwater.

PA's Groundwater and Drinking Water Web site provides information and resources that help facilities ensure safe drinking water and protect ground water

Free PDF reader available Protocol for Conducting Environmental Compliance Audits of Public Water Systems under the Safe Drinking Water Act (FIFRA) (PDF-1016K) was developed by EPA to provide guidance to public water systems conducting a review of facility conditions to determine their compliance with SDWA.

The Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) protects human health and the environment by requiring the testing of certain potentially hazardous chemicals and establishing regulations that restrict the manufacturing, processing, and use of such chemicals. Four chemical substances receive special attention under TSCA --- PCBs, asbestos, radon, and lead. Eight product categories are exempt from TSCA's regulatory authorities -- pesticides, tobacco, nuclear material, firearms and ammunition, food, food additives, drugs, and cosmetics. Many of these product categories are regulated under other Federal programs. TSCA regulations are set forth in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) at 40 CFR Parts 700-799, with Part 745 Exit EPA disclaimer detailing lead hazard reduction regulations and Part 761 Exit EPA disclaimer detailing management requirements for PCBs. Below are several compliance assistance tools that can help Federal facilities comply with these regulations:

TSCA Hotline provides up-to-date technical assistance and information about programs implemented under TSCA, the Asbestos School Hazard Abatement Reauthorization Act, the Residential Lead-Based Paint Hazard Reduction Act, and the Pollution Prevention Act. In addition, the Hotline provides a variety of documents, including Federal Register notices, reports, brochures, and booklets. The Hotline is a free service available to public citizens, State and local governments. Federal agencies, environmental and public interest groups, and Congressional members and staff. To contact the Hotline call (202) 554-1404 or E-mail tsca-hotline@epa.gov  

The National Lead Information Center (NLIC) provides the general public and professionals with information about lead hazards and their prevention. NLIC operates under a contract with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), with funding from EPA, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the Department of Housing and Urban Development.

National Radon Information Hotline Exit EPA disclaimer provides information about radon as well as a coupon for a  low-cost radon test kit. It is operated by the National Safety Council's Environmental Health Center under a grant  from the Environmental Protection Agency. 

EPA's Lead Program Homepage provides information and documents on how to comply with EPA's lead regulations and reduce residential lead hazards. 

EPA's Asbestos Web site provides information and resources to help facilities comply with the asbestos regulations under the Clean Air Act and the Toxic Substances Control Act.

EPA's PCB homepage provides information on the Federal program for regulating Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs).

Executive Orders

The Executive Office has published the following orders that direct Federal Agencies and facilities to become leaders in environmental protection and stewardship. The direction for each Executive Order (EO) depends on your facility and the activities conducted on-site. 

Executive Order 12088 "Federal Compliance With Pollution Control Standards" requires all Federal agencies to be in compliance with environmental laws and fully cooperate with EPA, State, interstate, and local agencies to prevent, control, and abate environmental pollution.

Executive Order 12146 Exit EPA disclaimer "Management of Legal Resources" established the Federal Legal Council  to promote communication and coordination among Federal legal offices.  It also created a process to mediate legal disputes between agencies, created a litigation notice system for civil litigation affecting the Federal government, and encourages agencies to release legal opinions that are statements or interpretations of agency policy, unless this would cause demonstrable harm. 

Executive Order 12580 "Superfund Implementation" and Executive Order 13016 "Amendment to Executive Order 12580" are the implementing Executive Orders for the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), commonly known as Superfund.  As such, the Executive Orders delegate certain CERCLA authorities and responsibilities to EPA and other Federal agencies. 

Executive Order 12898 "Federal Actions to Address Environmental Justice in Minority Populations and Low-Income Populations" requires Federal agencies to achieve environmental justice by identifying and addressing, as appropriate, any disproportionately high and adverse human health or environmental impacts that their programs, policies, and activities may have on minority or low-income populations. 

EO 11593 Exit EPA disclaimer "Protection and Enhancement of the Cultural Environment" requires agencies to nominate qualifying property for the National Register of Historic Places, maintain and restore historic sites, and work with the Department of Interior (DOI) in managing historic sites. Before a historic site is altered or destroyed, agencies must receive comments from the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation and provide the Library of Congress with detailed records of the property. DOI must encourage historic preservation, expedite the placing of Federal property on the National Register, support Federal historic preservation, and review surplus Federal property transfers. For information on historic preservation, please contact the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation Exit EPA disclaimer

EO 11988 "Floodplain Management" restricts Federal support of development in floodplains by mandating the preparation of environmental impact statements for projects in a floodplain, requiring Federal projects in a floodplain to meet National Flood Insurance Program standards, and requiring agencies to inform all participants of the dangers involved in floodplain activities. More information on floodplain management can be found at EPA's Flood Protection website.

EO 11990 "Protection of Wetlands" restricts Federal support of development in wetlands and outlines the use of the National Environmental Protection Act process (such as an Environmental Impact Statement) in determining whether building in a wetland is necessary. More information on wetlands can be found at EPA's Wetlands website

EO 12114 Exit EPA disclaimer "Environmental Effects Abroad of Major Federal Actions" requires Federal agencies with facilities located outside the United States to consider the impact of major actions on the environment. It identifies four categories of "major" actions and requires Federal agencies with facilities oversees to establish procedures, in consultation with the  Department of State and Council on Environmental Quality, for implementing the Order's requirements. 

EO 12777 "Implementation of Section 311 of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act of 1972, as amended, and the Oil Pollution Act" implements the Oil Pollution Act of 1990 by outlining emergency response procedures for managing spills of oil and hazardous materials into the waters inside U.S. jurisdiction. EPA, the U.S. Coast Guard, and the Department of Defense, Interior, Agriculture, Commerce, and Energy    participate in contingency planning.

EO 13045 "Protection of Children from Environmental Health Risks and Safety Risks" requires each Federal agency to make it a high priority to identify and assess environmental health risks and safety risks that may disproportionately affect children. It also requires that each agency's policies, programs, activities, and standards address disproportionate risks to children that result from environmental health risks and safety risks. In addition, it establishes the Task Force on Environmental Health Risks and Safety Risks to Children, which includes representatives from the President's Cabinet and selected Federal agencies. The Task Force makes recommendations to the President on Federal strategies for children's environmental health and safety. 

EO 13229 extended the existence of this Task Force until October 9, 2007.   More information on children's health can be obtained from EPA Region 2's Children's Health website.

EO 13101 strengthens and expands the Federal government's commitment to recycling and buying recycled-content and environmentally preferable products. It, among other things, elevates implementation of waste prevention and recycling activities to a new, White House-level  Steering committee; discontinues all government purchases of printing and writing paper not containing 30% postconsumer fiber by the end of 1998; increases government purchases of bio-based products to develop markets for these items; requires all Federal facilities to develop and implement affirmative procurement programs in accordance with section 6002 of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act; and requires agencies to establish long-term goals both for waste prevention and recycling and for buying recycled and environmentally preferable products. EPA Region 2 has created websites on Environmentally Preferable Purchasing and Waste Minimization to help Federal facilities comply with this order. 

EO 13123 "Greening the Government Through Efficient Energy Management" encourages government agencies to promote energy efficiency, water conservation, and the use of renewable energy products. It is also designed to help foster markets for new environmentally conscious technologies. It, among other things, requires Federal agencies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from facility energy use by 30 percent by the year 2010; mandates the reduction of energy consumption per gross square foot of each Federal facility (excluding industrial and laboratory facilities) by 30 percent by the year 2005, and by 35 percent by the year 2010; directs Federal industrial and laboratory facilities to reduce energy consumption by 20 percent by the year 2005, and 25 percent by 2010; encourages Federal facilities to implement renewable energy projects and purchase electricity from renewable energy sources, such as solar energy systems; and promotes water conservation and less reliance on petroleum fuels by the Federal government. EPA Region 2 has developed websites on Energy Efficiency and Water Conservation to help Federal facilities comply with this order. 

EO 13134 "Developing and Promoting Biobased Products and Bioenergy" makes it a national objective to triple the use of bioenergy and biotechnology by the year 2010 thus reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 100 million tons. It is hoped that the heightened focus on biomass technology will build on existing efforts to create new and economically feasible options for farmers, foresters, and other material producers by shaping renewable farm and forestry resources into a major source of affordable electricity, fuel, chemicals, pharmaceuticals, and other materials.

EO 13148 "Greening the Government Through Leadership in Environmental Management" holds the head of each Federal agency responsible for ensuring that all necessary actions are taken to integrate environmental accountability into agency day-to-day decisionmaking and long-term planning processes, across all agency missions, activities, and functions. It, among other things, requires Federal agencies to develop and implement environmental management systems (EMS) and environmental compliance audit programs; reduce their reported Toxic Release Inventory (TRI) releases and off-site transfers of toxic chemicals for treatment and disposal by 10 percent annually, or by 40 percent overall by December 31, 2006; decrease their use of certain priority chemicals that may result in significant harm to human health or the environment and that have known, readily available, less harmful substitutes for identified applications and purposes; phase out the procurement of Class I ozone-depleting substances for all nonexcepted uses by December 31, 2010; and implement cost-effective, environmentally sound landscaping practices. EPA Region 2 has developed webpages on EMSs, and alternatives to ozone-depleting refrigerants as well as a brochure on environmentally beneficial landscaping to help Federal facilities comply with this order. 

EO 13149 "Greening the Government Through Federal Fleet and Transportation Efficiency" requires each agency operating 20 or more motor vehicles within the United States to reduce its entire vehicle fleet's annual petroleum consumption by at least 20 percent by the end of FY 2005, compared with FY 1999 petroleum consumption levels and promotes the use of environmentally preferable motor vehicle products. For more information, please contact the Department of Energy's Office of Transportation Technologies and visit EPA Region 2's Environmentally Preferable Purchasing website.

EO 13221 Exit EPA disclaimer "Energy Efficient Standby Power Devices" requires Federal agencies when they purchase commercially available, off-the-shelf products that use external standby power devices or that contain an internal standby power function to purchase products that use no more than one watt in their standby power consuming mode. If such products are not available, Federal agencies shall purchase products with the lowest standby power wattage while in their standby power consuming mode.

 


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