Jump to main content.


Doing little things around the house can go a long way to having a healthy winter. This page provides seasonal tips to help you and your family find ways to reduce pollution and learn about the environment.

Home in Winter - Courtesy of NOAA

Protecting Your Family's Health

Protecting Yourself and Your Family From Radon in the Winter

Winter Heating Safety Resources

Ten Tips to Protect Children from Pesticides and Lead Poisoning around the Home

Winter Air Quality

Energy Efficiency and Resources

Tips to Stay Warm, Lower Your Bills and Help the Environment

Energy Saving for Your Business

Ducts

Residential Energy Efficiency

More Tips for Weathering the Winter Exit EPA Click for Disclaimer

E-cycling Electronic Gear You No Longer Use

Tips for February Fun Without Waste  

Top of page

Protecting Yourself and Your Family From Radon

Family in HouseRadon levels can soar during the colder months when residents keep windows closed and spend more time indoors. As many as 22,000 people die from lung cancer each year in the United States from exposure to indoor radon.

EPA Administrator Steve Johnson urges Americans to heed January as National Radon Action Month by testing their homes for one of the leading causes of lung cancer in the country, indoor radon gas. Approximately one home in 15 across the nation has unacceptably high radon levels; in some areas of the country, as many as one out of two homes has high levels

EPA Recommends:

For more information about radon testing, call EPA's hotline at 800-SOS-RADON or visit EPA's radon web site.

Top of page

Winter Heating Safety Resources

Hazards may be associated with almost all types of appliances. The purpose of this booklet is to answer some common questions you may have about the potential for one specific type of hazard - indoor air pollution - associated with one class of appliances - combustion appliances.

Living Room with Wood StoveCombustion appliances are those which burn fuels for warmth, cooking, or decorative purposes. Typical fuels are gas, both natural and liquefied petroleum; kerosene; oil; coal; and wood. Examples of the appliances are space heaters, ranges, ovens, furnaces, woodburning stoves, fireplaces, water heaters, and clothes dryers. These appliances are usually safe. However, under certain conditions, these appliances can produce combustion pollutants that can damage your health, or even kill you.

Possible health effects range from headaches, dizziness, sleepiness, and watery eyes to breathing difficulties or even death. Similar effects may also occur because of common medical problems or other indoor air pollutants. ...more

Top of page

A Tip about Child Safety

VeggiesEPA has ten good ideas for protecting your children from pesticides and lead poisoning in your home.

 

 

Top of page

Winter Air Quality

Air Now LogoEPA , together with state and local governments, has expanded air quality forecasting to include year-round, daily information on particle pollution. "Particle pollution" consists of microscopic particles in the air that can get deep into the lungs, potentially causing serious health problems. Unlike summertime ozone, particle pollution can occur throughout the year. Although particle levels aren't high every day, you should check your Air Quality Index (AQI) forecasts to determine whether you need to take action to reduce your exposure. Forecasts, health information, and maps showing real-time particle levels are available on EPA's AIRNow web site at: www.epa.gov/airnow.

Top of page

Tips to Stay Warm, Lower Your Bills and Help the EnvironmentEnergy Star Logo and Link

Improve your home's comfort and save energy and money while doing the right thing for the environment. By using energy efficiently in your home, you can make a difference by preventing air pollution from power plants. Follow EPA's simple recommendations.

Top of page

Energy Saving for Your Business

Find financial resources, find ENERGY STAR products and services, calculate your savings, receive free technical help, get a no-cost upgrade manual, and get recognition for your efforts.  More

Top of page

Ducts

It's the time of year when homes have their highest energy demand of the year. Heating accounts for 34% of all annual utility usage and is part of what makes an average home twice the emitter of carbon dioxide emissions as a vehicle. Here is a way to reduce the demand for expensive space heating.

DuctsCheck the ducts. To ensure that as much warm air as possible is delivered through your central system, check the ductwork and wrap any leaks with duct mastic. Distribution losses (what's lost while air is transported from your furnace through ductwork to the vents) often amounts to 30%. So, sealing ductwork could increase efficiency and the warm air you receive considerably ... keeping you warmer and making your furnace work less.

Top of page

Residential Energy Efficiency

Piggy BankThis website shows effective ways to reduce home energy consumption. Topics include insulation, windows, doors, weather-stripping, and caulking.

Top of page

More Tips for Weathering the Winter

Top of page

E-cycling Electronic Gear You No Longer Use

Plug-In To Recycling and Resource Conservation Challenge LogosIs your old TV serving as a coffee table while your retired computer is doubling as a plant stand? And with new technology introduced every day-more powerful computers, HDTVs, and combination wireless phone and internet, do you wonder just how many plant stands and coffee tables you have room for?

You are not alone-that's why EPA launched a campaign to get the word out about opportunities to reuse and recycle your old computers, TVs, and cell phones. 

Motivate yourself to start E-cycling by watching a short video.

Top of page

Tips for February Fun Without Waste

This Valentine's Day, show your love for the earth by sending recycled-content greeting cards. Consider making new cards from scrap paper or by attaching new backs to the fronts of old cards—this can be a craft project for family and friends that helps everyone reduce paper waste while saving money!

Top of page

 


Local Navigation

EPA Environmental Kids Club

Jump to main content.