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Agriculture Projects

EPA Region 4 works closely with many partners to achieve shared environmental goals via agriculture projects. The following links focus on General-Water Quality, General-Climate Change/Renewable Energy, General-Environmental Stewardship, General-Outreach and Collaboration, General-Pesticide Stewardship, SEDC, Pesticides, Environmental Justice, RCRA and Watershed 319 Grants related to agriculture in Region 4.

General - Water Quality
Name Description State Award year
Environmental Justice Farmers' Initiative Improve surface and ground water quality in selected Region 4 priority watersheds, 303(d) listed streams and/or streams with a Total Maximum Daily Load. Georgia 2009
Duplin Environmental Health and Awareness Project - Consenus and Resolution Collaborative problem solving grant to work with swine industry to address water quality degradation North Carolina 2009
Duplin Environmental Health and Awareness Project - Consensus and Resolution Conduct drinking water well sampling in impacted communities North Carolina 2009

 

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General - Climate Change / Renewable Energy
Name Description State Award year
Environmental Defense Fund Investigation and establishment of a carbon offset aggregating entity with the swine industry. North Carolina 2008
Murphy Brown, LLC Multi-farm, closed loop anaerobic swine digester North Carolina 2009-2010

EPA AgStar Program Small-scale bag anaerobic digester for swine and dairy producers North Carolina

2009-2010

Sunbelt Milk Producers and Florida Farm Bureau

Dairy digester partnership with Sunbelt Milk Producers Florida

2009-2010
Diesel Irrigation Pump Replacement Diesel Irrigation pump replacement and increase pump efficiency project Mississippi

2009-2010

On-farm ethanol production from sweet potato, sweet sorghum and waste pawpaw feedstocks Mobile sweet sorghum ethanol production for small scale farmers Kentucky

2009-2010

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General - Environmental Stewardship
Name Description State Award year
Perdue Clean Waters Environmental Initiative

Partner with Perdue Farms to provide training, assistance and environmental assessments to over 950 poultry producers

Cheasapeake Bay and Coastal Bays throughout Delmarva Peninsula

2009-2012

Agriculture Plastics Recycling

Implement a pilot project to collect and recycle agriculture plastics in lieu of disposal in a landfill or burning Georgia 2010

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General - Outreach and Collaboration
Name Description State Award year
Region 4 Agriculture Website

Communicate with the agriculture sector on pending/final regulations

Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee

On-going

Region 4 Agriculture Field Tours Participate in NRCS State Technical Committee Meetings Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee On-going

Support Florida A&M University Biological and Agricultural Systems Engineering Program Advisory Board and Center for Water and Air Quality Advisory Council Florida

On-going

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General - Pesticide Stewardship
Name Description State Award year
Pesticide Resistance Management

Incorporate resistance data into regulatory decisions

Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee

2009 –2010

Integrated Pest Management Provide compliance assistance to Mississippi Delta farmers transitioning to emerging cropping systems Mississippi 2009-2010

Support Pesticide Amnesty Days State waste pesticide collection day when growers can turn in cancelled or suspended pesticide products without having to pay for their disposal. Shows how the waste products must be repackaged, labeled and recorded on a manifest before they can be transferred to a disposal facility. Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee

2009-2010

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Southeast Diesel Collaborative(SEDC)
Name Description State Award year
Development of Improved Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Opportunities on Alabama Department of Corrections Agricultural Facilities, Biodiesel in farm equipment.

The Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs (ADECA); Energy, Weatherization and Technology (EWT) Division awarded an Agriculture Energy Program grant to The Alabama Department of Corrections (ADOC) for the development of renewable energy opportunities within the state's prison system. ADOC currently houses about 26,000 inmates in 34 facilities across the state. The kitchens in these facilities consume approximately 1 million pounds of vegetable cooking oil per year. Research suggests that about one-half of the cooking oil used by these facilities ends up as waste vegetable oil (WVO). Several of ADOC larger prisons are currently paying commercial renderers as much as $300 per year for disposal of the WVO being generated. ADOC will purchase two waste oil burning furnaces and a farm scale biodiesel processor for installation at its Draper Farm operations. WVO and used motor oil will be used to heat the Draper farm garage displacing the $6,300 currently spent annually for natural gas. The remaining WVO will be used to produce biodiesel that will fuel trucks and farm equipment resulting in approximately $9,400 annual savings in fuel costs at the Draper location. In addition to the prospects of significant cost savings to the state, this project will provide inmates with experience and valuable training in a rapidly emerging field of technology that has varied commercial applications. The waste oil furnace portion of the project has been successful. Alabama  
Sweet Briar Farm, Danville, KY- HDV B20

This project is for heavy duty diesel equipment to use B20. Two bailers with usage rate of 95 hr/yr/vehicle and 74 HP; 4 tractors w usage rate of 474 hr/yr/vehicle and a 174 HP; 1 sprayer w usage rate of 90 and 174 HP; 1 swather with usage rate of 110 and 100 HP; 2 movers w usage rate of 363, 100 HP; 1 combine with usage rate of 150 and 300 HP; 5 trucks (off-highway)with usage rate of 895 and 740 HP.

Kentucky

 

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Pesticides
Name Description State Award year
Integrating Sod Based Rotation into Row Crop Farming Operations to Support Economically and Environmentally Sustainable Integrated Pest Management (IPM) Production in South Georgia

The project is a component of the Flint River Basin Program and is expected to reduce pesticide use by demonstrating and promoting a four year sod based rotation of Bahia grass, Bahia grass, peanuts and cotton.

Georgia 2007 (partial) 2008 (partial)
Developing and Implementing an Innovative Approach for Increasing the Use of Reduced Risk Pest Management Practices in NC Sweet Potato Production Through Leveraging of Federal Conservation Programs This is a train the trainer project which will work with Extension, university and private IPM educators to enhance their skills in working with sweet potato growers who can take advantage of the new practice standard under the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service Environmental Quality Incentives Program. This project is one in a series of projects supported by EPA and USDA which has had its goal to reduce pesticide use in sweet potatoes, an important crop for baby food.

North Carolina 2007
Operation Transition: The Evolution of large-Scale Conventional producers of Food Crops in Florida to Sustainable Agriculture and Organic Practices Through Education, Outreach and Assistance

This project will transition conventional farmers to organic production systems throughout the state of Florida with an emphasis on demonstration and outreach. The goal is to transition 20 large scale growers and 5,000 acres to be certified organic after three years of “Operation Transitions” implementation.

Florida 2007
Pesticide Stewardship and Risk Reduction in Mississippi

Project will reduce the use of highly toxic pesticides and associated risks in corn, soybeans and rice in Mississippi. Project will develop educational materials, conduct outreach and verify performance of participating farmers. Project will encourage adoption of recommended best management practices.

Mississippi 2008

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Environmental Justice (EJ)
Name Description State Award year
Environmental Justice Farmers’ Initiative (EJFI) Improve surface and ground water quality in selected Region 4 priority watersheds, 303(d) listed streams and/or streams with a TMDL. Collaborate to provide outreach to landowners about water quality information, Best Management Practices, and access to funding and technical assistance. Target minority and low-income landowners in Georgia. Foster locally-led collaboration with the farm community.

Alabama, Georgia, Mississippi, South Carolina

2009
Clean Water and Air for All in Rural North Carolina Provide outreach, education, and technical assistance to communities and health care providers in five eastern North Carolina (NC) counties. North Carolina

2008

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Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA)
Name Description State Award year
Agriculture Plastics Recycling

The overarching long-term goal of this project is to contribute to development of a nationwide sustainable infrastructure for collection and pollution-preventing disposal of the throwaway plastics used in agriculture, particularly film products, e.g., the dairy bags, bunker silo covers, and baleage wrap used to exclude oxygen from stored forage; irrigation drip tape; greenhouse covers; mulch and fumigation films; tarps; bird and bale netting; seed, feed and fertilizer bags, etc.

Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee

TBD

Management of Tomato Culls and Waste Water on Tomato Packinghouses

A study to develop an organic fertilizer (tomato compost) from the culls, while the wastewater will be reused on packinghouses. Anticipated outcomes from the project include: 1) the reduction of 149,626 to 399,003 tons of tomato culls per season (two seasons per year), 2) the development of tomato compost and use of culls as animal feed, 3) the characterization of wastewater from packinghouses for nutrients, metals, pesticides, volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and test the scope of chemical amendments to remove these contaminates from the wastewater, 4) reuse 20 million gallons of wastewater per season on tomato packinghouses (two seasons), and 5) provide training, education, and outreach opportunities to county extension agents, and stakeholders to advance the adoption of best management practices in other tomato packinghouses in Florida and throughout the Southeast U.S. EPA anticipates this project to begin by July 2008.

Florida 2008

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Watersheds 319 Grants
Name Description State Award year
Implementation of the Nonpoint Source Components of TMDLs and Watershed-Based Management Plans

This project will provide Section 319 incremental grant funding to develop and implement the nonpoint source components of TMDL/watershed-based management plans that incorporate Section 319 grant guideline “a-i” watershed plan elements.  This project serves as a “planning tool” for the state to efficiently allocate grant funding to address NPS water quality issues, to identify and cooperate with stakeholders, target priority watersheds, and provide voluntary incentive-based management solutions. This project will speed implementation of the NPS components of TMDLs and NPS watershed plans and restore impaired waters on Section 303(d) lists. Funding will also be used to develop additional future Section 319 grant year proposals and watershed plans. As stakeholders express an interest in developing and implementing watershed management plans, Section 319 funding may then be provided through this project if the plans target specific nonpoint source pollution sources and causes, and state water quality standards and use classifications.

Alabama 2008
Nonpoint Source Management Program Flexibility for Emerging Issues

Partnering with stakeholders to develop and implement nonpoint source management programs and activities makes good environmental, financial, social, and administrative sense. A holistic approach strengthens public and private sector efforts at the federal, state, and local levels and achieves the greatest environmental protection benefits.  The ADEM continues to place great emphasis on assuring that Section 319 grant funds are used efficiently and effectively to address nonpoint source management program goals and objectives. This project is designed to provide resources to address unanticipated, emerging, previously unaddressed, or inadequately addressed NPS concerns and issues. It will then provide resources to implement environmentally-protective and economically-feasible management practices in a coordinated and timely manner. Although previous Section 319 workplans, watershed-based management plans, and other stakeholder efforts have attempted to provide a focused and iterative approach to known NPS issues and concerns, oftentimes unexpected problems arise that necessitate immediate management measure action or attention. However, because of prior commitments of limited available funds, the newly emerging impairment or situation is often made worse by lack of resources to timely and properly address it; and water quality and environmental health continues to unnecessarily degrade.

Alabama 2008

Rotational River Basin Approach: Surface Water Quality Assessment of the Tennessee River Basin

  Alabama

2008
Surface Water Quality Screening Assessment of Rivers, Reservoirs, and Tributary Embayments of the Tennessee River Basin and Water Quality Assessment of Alabama Reservoirs for Nutrient Criteria and Total Maximum Daily Loads

  Alabama 2008
Watershed-Based Plan Implementation Effectiveness This project will target the nonpoint source components of watershed-based plans in selected watersheds throughout Alabama. Information specific to water quality (e.g. physical, chemical, biological parameters), nutrient criteria, habitats, index of biotic integrity, ecoregions, large scope and scale river basins/subbasins, smaller scope and scale watersheds, project or site specific areas, or particular best management practices, may be obtained to aid in the development or implementation of watershed-based plans, to document pre-or post-best management practice implementation status, ascertain the cumulative effectiveness of implemented TMDL/nonpoint source practices, and to report NPS pollutant load reductions. Data will also be used to provide information critical to incorporation of the “a-i” watershed plan components as presented in Section 319 grant guidelines. This project will also be useful in assessing the types and numbers of management practices needed to protect threatened or unimpaired watersheds.

Alabama 2008
C-7  Watershed Education Program

The Coordinator’s main responsibilities will be: a) the planning and implementation of our annual hands-on riverside environmental education program for fourth-graders throughout the Haw River watershed; b) helping organize our major outreach/volunteer programs for the public; and c) expanding educational work with schools, including a new stream monitoring program for middle schools.

The goals of our Watershed Education program are:

--Educating 1500 children each year, from public, private, and home schools in the Haw River watershed, about stream ecology, pollution and stormwater issues, and stream stewardship principles, at the Haw River Learning Celebration; and providing continuing educational tools throughout the year.

--Educating the public, including those who volunteer with us, about pollution issues, including stormwater and sediment, and solutions, through our river cleanups, riparian enhancement projects, the annual Haw River Festival, and our use of the hands-on “watershed model” to educate the public at fairs, colleges, community presentations, and other public outreach events.

--Launching a new program at seven middle schools (in Guilford, Rockingham, Alamance, Chatham, Orange, Wake and Durham counties) to train teachers and students to monitor a stream that is on-site (or adjacent) for basic chemical and biological health indicators, as well as assessing turbidity, algae, and overall stream and riparian buffer conditions. This new initiative will be guided by the Haw River Assembly’s River Watch project coordinator who heads up our stream monitoring work with volunteer teams that have been gathering data in the watershed since 1995.
North Carolina 2008

I-10  Collaborative Restoration and Protection of High Quality Resources in Tick Creek and Rocky River Watersheds

The NC Ecosystem Enhancement Program completed a local watershed assessment and targeting of restoration plan in 2005 for this subbasin, but they are not currently pursuing implementation of any projects. Some separate watershed protection and restoration efforts are underway by various parties. The County supports a coordinated effort to revisit the NCEEP plan, invite all affected parties to share efforts and data, review EEP report’s methodology, prioritize projects, and identify information gaps, monitoring needs, and funding. We propose a two prong approach- to convene and coordinate a Rocky River watershed effort, and to focus immediate restoration efforts on Tick Creek, a rural watershed dominated by agricultural land use. The effort will include compiling a geodatabase to update land use data and indicators for the watershed, and to evaluate Tick Creek past and projected land use changes.

North Carolina

2008

I-2  Dan River Watershed BMP's

The primary objective of this project is to implement best management practices (BMPs) throughout the Dan River Watershed to address water quality issues and restore waters not meeting state standards. The BMPs listed in this proposal will directly reduce sediment delivery and fecal coliform bacteria to the impaired waters. Other benefits can be expected as well since many of the proposed BMPs will prevent off-site movement of pesticides, phosphorus, and nitrogen. Improvements in streambank stability and habitat for fish and macroinvertebrates will also be realized. The Dan River is listed on North Carolina’s Draft 2008-303(d) list and approved 2006 303(d) list because of high levels of turbidity and fecal coliform bacteria. Erosion and sedimentation from agriculture has been identified as a potential source. The overall goal of this project is restoring full uses to the Dan River.

North Carolina

2008
I-5  Delineating Agriculture in the Neuse River Basin

Change in agricultural activity is essential to protect water resources in the Neuse Estuary. We will provide field-scale data consisting of information on animal numbers, nutrient management, agricultural crops, soil erosion losses, soil test phosphorus levels and best management practices by conducting a survey of agricultural producers in the Neuse River Basin during the fall of 2008 or 2009. Field samples will be drawn from a prior enumeration of this basin eight years previously. In addition to providing field-level agricultural information for the Neuse basin, we will also be able to enumerate current practices in the Neuse basin and estimate nutrient losses to the watershed.

North Carolina 2008

I-6  Lower Creek Watershed Restoration Implementation Plan (LCWRIP)

Caldwell County and Burke County Soil and Water Conservation Districts are requesting $222,010 for water quality improvement projects that will implement the Lower Creek Watershed Management Plan (Ecosystem Enhancement Program, 2006) and the TMDL for turbidity in the Lower Creek Watershed. The overall goal of this project is to restore uses to at least two tributaries to Lower Creek. Lower Creek is impaired because of high turbidity levels. The following tributaries of Lower Creek including Lower Creek are 303(d) listed due to Impaired Biological Integrity:  Greasy Creek, Spainhour Creek, and Zack’s Fork Creek in Caldwell County and Bristol Creek in Burke County. Erosion and sedimentation from agriculture has been identified as a potential source of pollution to Lower Creek.

The Districts would like to continue on-going efforts of working in the Lower Creek atershed to install best management practices (BMPs) according to the USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service technical standards that would improve riparian zones and limit livestock access to the streams, for improved water quality. The Districts are eager to expand efforts in the Lower Creek watershed to install storm water BMPs that will decrease storm water runoff and thereby protect stream banks from erosive storms.

North Carolina 2008
I-7  Lower Abbotts Creek Watershed Plan

The Piedmont Triad Council of Governments (PTCOG) will produce a comprehensive watershed plan based on the EPA’s 9 Key Elements guidelines to identify and mitigate pollution sources in the lower Abbotts Creek watershed of Davidson County, NC. This plan will rely upon a combination of public outreach, field work, GIS analysis, and computer modeling, and is designed for project and policy implementation. A Final Report constituted of an implementation timeline, a detailed watershed assessment, and a project atlas listing the most significant restoration and mitigation sites in the area is the primary product of this project. North Carolina 2008

I-8  Newfound Creek Watershed Project

Buncombe County Soil & Water Conservation District (SWCD) is requesting $459,201 over three years for water quality improvement projects that will implement the TMDL for fecal coliform in Newfound Creek Watershed.

The priority of the Newfound Project is to reduce fecal coliform and sediment through the installation of Best Management practices (BMP’s) recognized by state and federal agencies. The Newfound Watershed Project has been growing for 10 years; helping landowners improving water quality through continuing education and installation of BMP’s through grant funds from Buncombe SWCD. These BMP’s include stream protection projects, critical area planting, riparian buffers, septic repair projects, stream bank stabilization and access road stabilization.

These projects will all assist in reducing fecal coliform and sediment loading in Newfound Creek. Continuous water quality monitoring will show their positive impact on water quality improvements within the watershed. With a 40% match from other partnering agencies and grants of $384,659 the Buncombe SWCD will continue to promote the program and improve water quality throughout Newfound Creek. Newfound Creek Watershed is a high priority for the Buncombe County Soil and Water Conservation District (SWCD). Newfound Creek is currently listed on the NC EPA 303 (d) list, as being severely impaired, due to non-point source pollution caused by sediment and fecal contamination .

North Carolina 2008
Boone Watershed Partnership - Sinking Creek Restoration Boone Watershed Partnership, Inc. (BWP) – will administer the project and coordinate work of cooperating organizations.  BWP will develop education and outreach related to the project (i.e. signage, public meetings, and BMP tours).  Additionally BWP will develop and coordinate volunteer monitoring aspects of the project. Tennessee

2008
Greene County SCD - College Creek Restoration College Creek has been classified as a warm water stream and is placed in the eco-region of Central Appalachian Ridges and Valleys. The soil within this watershed is Highly Erodible Soil (HEL) and will require special attention to sufficient sod coverage in critical areas. Tennessee 2008
UT- Restoration of Riparian Zone from Livestock Grazing along the Harpeth River Watershed Previous demonstrations have shown that removing cattle from creek banks and planting trees will reduce the degradation of the creek bank. Allowing animals to have access to the stream only in a limited number of places reduces the time spent in the creek and thus reduces destruction of the bottom of the creek and less manure and urine deposited in the creek. In this watershed it has been documented that water quality has been reduced due to pasture grazing. It is anticipated at the cooperator will continue with the practices utilized following the demonstration. Tennessee

2008
Development of an Ecological Data Analyses Tool for Nonpoint Source TMDL and Watershed-Based Management Plan Implementation Reporting The Alabama Department of Environmental Management (ADEM) has been involved for over 20 years in using fish, benthic macroinvertebrates, and algae as indicators of water resource quality for streams and rivers throughout the state. These data are essential to the assessment of impairments from nutrient enrichment and sedimentation, as well as for making aquatic life use support determinations. Data is used routinely by several programs to make informed water quality and watershed protection planning ecisions.Examples of these programs include Water Quality Standards, Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDL), and the Waterbody Assessment, 303(d) Listing, and Integrated Report. In addition, these data are needed by the ADEM Nonpoint Source Unit to monitor the success of watershed management plan implementation.

Alabama 2007
Implementation of Nonpoint Source Components of TMDLs and Watershed Based Management Plans

This project will provide Section 319 incremental grant funding to develop and implement TMDL and watershed-based management plans that incorporate Section 319 grant guideline “a-i” watershed plan elements. This project serves as a “ planning tool” for the state to efficiently and practicably allocate grant funding to address NPS water quality issues, identify and cooperate with watershed partners, target priority watersheds, and provide voluntary incentive-based management solutions to the most pressing water quality problems. Watershed plans will be developed to provide goals, objectives, and timelines for impaired waters in watersheds, to be determined. Implementation of the NPS components of TMDLs and NPS watershed plans will speed restoration of impaired waters on the Section 303(d) List. Funding from this project will be used to develop additional FY06 project workplans. As stakeholders demonstrate an interest in developing and implementing watershed management plans, Section 319 assistance may be provided through this project if the plans target specific nonpoint source TMDL pollutant sources and causes and address pollutant load reductions needed to achieve state water quality standards.

Alabama 2007

NPS Management Program Flexibility for Emerging Issues

This project will provide a source of “immediate needs” funding to encourage stakeholders to develop and implement their own local management tools and techniques to protect water quality and natural resources. In addition, project funds may be used to:

a) Address specific NPS pollutant load reductions

b) Prevent new impairments and protect threatened or unimpaired waters from future impairments

c) Implement best management practices to address NPS pollutant runoff

d) Provide technical and programmatic assistance

e) Fill in water quality data and information gaps needed to complete a watershed plan in a timely manner

f) Address NPS pollutants and components of a watershed management plan

g) Help in de-listing NPS impaired waterbodies from the Section 303(d) list.

h) Support Clean Water Partnerships to restore, maintain, and protect water quality

i) Provide NPS meetings and conferences to address on-going, new and emerging issues

j) Support NPS education and outreach and provide training to specific audiences

k) Provide estimates of nitrogen, phosphorus, and sediment load reductions based upon water quality monitoring, modeled data, literature searches, and other documentation.

l) Support river basin scope and scale and smaller watershed facilitator and coordinator activities.
Alabama 2007

Rotational River Basin Approach: Surface Water Quality Assessment of the Black Warrior and Cahaba River Basins

This project is expected to provide an estimate of the status of ecological conditions throughout the Black Warrior and Cahaba (BWC) river basins and provide data to categorize selected monitoring sites in Alabama’s Integrated Assessment Report. It can support ADEM’s Ecoregional Reference Reach Program by collecting biological, chemical and habitat data at ADEM’s established Ecoregional Reference Reaches within the BWC and help in identifying and monitoring other least-impaired reaches within the river basins. By providing data useful to developing indicators and assessment criteria that link chemical, physical, and biological conditions within a wadeable stream reach to conditions throughout the stream’s watershed, this project will also support ADEM Nonpoint Source Unit efforts to: identify impaired and least disturbed nonpoint source sites, incorporate intensive monitoring in selected watersheds; and assess the effectiveness of BMP’s implemented using Section 319 grant funds.

Alabama 2007
Surface Water Quality Screening Assessment of Rivers, Reservoirs, and Tributary Embayments of the Black Warrior  and Cahaba River Basins and Water Quality Assessment of Alabama Reservoirs for Nutrient Criteria and Total Maximum Daily Loads

Water quality data collected during this project will provide an estimate of the current water quality and trophic state of the rivers, reservoirs, tributary embayments, and stream tributaries of the Black Warrior River and Cahaba River Basins.  Water quality assessments of these nonwadeable waterbodies will complement the assessment of wadeable streams proposed in the FY07 Base Section 319 Project 2 entitled: “Rotational River Basin Approach: Surface Water Quality Assessment of the Black Warrior and Cahaba River Basins” and allow for more definitive determinations of water quality.

Alabama

2007
Wolf Creek Watershed Project Wolf Creek is a tributary of the Little Tallapoosa River-Wedowee Creek subwatershed (12-digit HUC 03151081004) and is part of the Coopers Rock Creek Subwatershed within the Tallapoosa River Basin.  The watershed is wholly located in Randolph County, near the Morrison’s Crossroads community, approximately 9 miles NE of Wedowee. The watershed has a drainage area of 5.2 square miles.  This 4-mile stream segment is impaired from the Little Tallapoosa River to its source.  Alabama 2007

Coastal NPS Program

To address the impacts of nonpoint source pollution on coastal water quality, Congress enacted section 6217, "Protecting Coastal Waters," which was codified as 16 U.S.C. -1455b. This section provides that each State with an approved coastal zone management program must develop and submit to EPA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) for approval a Coastal Nonpoint Pollution Control Program. The purpose of the program "shall be to develop and implement management measures for nonpoint source pollution to restore and protect coastal waters, working in close conjunction with other State and local authorities." Georgia’s Coastal Nonpoint Source Program is under development and has existing conditions imposed by EPA and NOAA in order to achieve full approval. EPA has directed that states with conditional approval dedicate a minimum of $100,000 in 319 grant funds each year toward program development to achieve full approval. Georgia’s deadline for program submission is June 2007.

Georgia

2007
Ebenezer Creek DO TMDL Implementation Project Ebenezer Creek is listed on the Section 305(b) list of “rivers and streams not supporting designated uses”. The criterion violated is dissolved oxygen and the designated use is fishing. This project will install agricultural BMPs on farms in the Ebenezer Creek Watershed and will help implement the Dissolved Oxygen (DO) TMDL Implementation Plan for Ebenezer Creek, which was developed using USEPA funds. Georgia

2007
Implementing Agricultural Components of the Yam Grandy and Jacks Creek Watershed TMDL Implementation Plans

The Ohoopee River Watershed is located in the northern Coastal Plain of Georgia in the Altamaha River Basin. As identified in the 2006 305(b)/303(d) Rivers/Streams Not Fully Supporting Designated Uses, Jack’s Creek and Yam Grandy Creek are listed as “not supporting” or partially supporting their designated uses with fecal coliform as the criteria violated. This project area consists of 38,895 acres of which 65% of livestock producers are expected to participate. This project accompanied by the USDA EQIP program funds that will include participation from a very large percentage of livestock producers and will have a significant effect on reducing the agricultural contribution to criterion violation. Georgia 2007
Implementing Agricultural Components of TMDL Implementation Plans in the Upper Broad River Basin

The TMDL Implementation Plan has identified nonpoint sources as the primary cause of excessive pollutant loading. The plan advocates the installation of BMPs to address the major pollutant categories of concern for the watershed. The Upper Broad River Watershed TMDL Implementation Project will provide opportunities for the planning and installation of BMPs that meet EPD requirements and may supply some of the data necessary for any revision of the Georgia TMDL Implementation Plan.

The Chestatee-Chattahoochee RC&D Council has an ongoing project, the North Fork Broad River 319(h) Project. This project is exclusive to the North Fork Broad River Watershed in Franklin and Stephens Counties. The focus of this project has been soil erosion BMP installation and prevention. The installation of stream revetments has been the predominant practice within the North Fork Broad River 319(h) Project with some exclusion fencing, critical area treatment and stream crossings also being installed. In addition, this project also targets a limited number of unpaved (dirt) roads to reduce soil erosion and sediment transport. The North Fork Broad River 319(h) Project does not address animal waste issues, and the total number of participants has been somewhat limited by the substantial cost of stream revetments. The proposed Upper Broad River Watershed Project will compliment this and other existing programs by continuing to offer cost share funding for soil erosion BMP installation and by offering additional funding for the implementation of BMPs that address animal waste issues within a larger portion of the Broad River Watershed.

Georgia 2007
Implementing Agricultural Components of TMDL Implementation Plans in the Upper Ochlockonee River Basin

The GAEPD is proposing Best Management Practice (BMP) projects to address the major pollutant categories of concern for the River Basin. The Upper Ochlockonee River Basin TMDL Implementation Project will provide opportunities for the planning and installation of BMPs that will meet the EPD requirements for such practices and may supply some of the data necessary for any revisions to the Georgia TMDL Implementation Plan.

Upper Ochlockonee TMDL Implementation Project will provide additional funding to accelerate the installation of those BMPs that can best address animal waste, nutrients and soil erosion in the contributing drainage areas above those stream segments showing significant water quality impairment. It is estimated approximately 74% of producer applications with proposed practices that would have significant potential to improve runoff to these impaired streams were not approved because of inadequate funding. They were approximately $3.5 million dollars in cost share requests in the Middle South Georgia Soil and Water Conservation District, (Colquitt, Thomas and Worth Counties), while funding was approved for only $1.2 million dollars.

This project is part of a continuing and multi-phased effort attempting to respond to watershed TMDLs by implementing agricultural BMPs to restore, abate, and improve water quality in watershed streams used for aquatic habitat and contact recreation.

Georgia 2007

Potato Creek BMP Implmentation

The lower portion of Potato Creek was placed on the 1998 303(d) list as impaired due to fecal coliform.  In 2002, this reach was removed from the list and replaced by the middle portion of Potato Creek, again as impaired due to fecal coliform. The EPA established a TMDL for fecal coliform in Potato Creek in 1998. A TMDL Implementation Plan was formulated by the McIntosh Trail Regional Development Center,(RDC) in 2001 as part of the state-wide effort by the RDCs to produce implementation plans for all TMDLs. In an effort to development a more cost-effective field application of tracking fecal coliform sources, the RDC applied for a 319 grant in 2003. A partnership with the University of Georgia, (UGA) was developed in this project with UGA providing research quality investigation into the sources of fecal coliform in the Potato Creek Watershed. One result of the previous 319 Grant has been to develop the cost-effective field application using a combination of targeted water quality sampling and fluorometry.

Georgia

2007
Spring Creek Watershed Partnership

To future help improve the water quality in Spring Creek, the Golden Triangle RC&D Council with the assistance from the SCWP is using FY01 Section 319(h) Grant funds to develop a comprehensive Watershed Management Plan (WMP), work with landowners to implement BMPs, and conduct public education and outreach.

The SCWP is now focused on implementing the WMP and will use in part FY07 Section 319(h) Grant funds to carryout this project, “Implementation of the Spring Creek Management Plan Project Phase II”. In this project, the WMP will be implemented and updated, additional landowners will be approved for BMPs, and outreach and public education activities will be continued.

Georgia 2007
Water Quality Improvement Projects for the Corbin City Reservoir Watershed

  Kentucky 2007
Bear/Yellow Creek (MSWCC)

The purpose of this MOA is to reduce non-point source (NPS) pollution within the Bear Creek Sub-Watershed (USGS HUC-06030006) and Yellow Creek Sub-Watershed (USGS HUC-06030005).  Because of NPS pollution from sediment,  primarily as a result of poor agricultural and silvicultural practices, various BMPs and other activities, i.e. public education and outreach, need to be implemented. These sub-watersheds are located in the Pickwick Reservoir Watershed, Hydrologic Unit Code 0603, in Tishomingo County in north Mississippi.

Mississippi 2007
Bear/Yellow Creek (TVA)

This project will address non-point source pollution in Yellow and Bear Creeks in northeast Mississippi. Primary emphasis will be given to reduce sediment and organic pollution. Partners will work with interested residents and property owners to increase water quality awareness and establish efforts to improve water quality in these watersheds. Emphasis will be given to projects that will help remove Caney, Little Cripple Deer and Cripple Deer Creeks and Holly Branch from the State’s 303(d) list. Since Caney Creek is a priority watershed for Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and MDEQ, and waters from this watershed could have direct impact on the Short Coleman and proposed Doskie water intakes, priority will be given to all projects in this watershed.

Mississippi

2007
CZARA (Turkey Creek) The purpose of this project is to acquire sensitive parcels of land located within the Mississippi Coastal Zone. Mississippi 2007
Lake Washington Lake Washington and two of its unnamed tributaries have been placed on Mississippi’s 303 (d) list of impaired waterbodies as being impaired due to sediment. The Lake Washington watershed is composed of a complex series of natural levees, slack water areas and shallow depressions that parallel the meander belt of the old river channel. Lake Washington is an oxbow lake and is the largest waterbody in the watershed with 2,965 acres of open water and receives drainage from a number of ditches including several connected to Lake Britton, Lake Bryant and Lake Jackson. Lake Washington is drained by Washington Bayou, which is a tributary of Steele Bayou. Mississippi 2007
Wolf/Broad Lake Project

In cooperation with the Wolf Lake Watershed Implementation Team, Delta F.A.R.M. proposes to develop and implement a Comprehensive Watershed Implementation Plan (WIP) for the Wolf Lake Watershed (HUC: 08030206 & 303(d) List Segment ID: MS363WLM, MS363E) in order to improve water quality in Wolf and Broad Lakes. As identified as a priority watershed by the Yazoo River Basin Team, this project will attempt to implement solutions in the Wolf Lake Watershed that address all concerns that have been identified by the Watershed Implementation Team (WIT).  The primary objective of this project will be to implement solutions that will use established Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) as a target to help achieve Wolf and Broad Lake’s designated use.  TMDLs on Wolf and Broad Lake include Sedimentation/Siltation, Organic Enrichment/Low DO, Nutrients, and Legacy Pesticides.

Mississippi 2007
B-1 Nondischarge Permitting and Enforcementp>

As the population of North Carolina grows and the waste assimilation capacity of the state's streams is diminished, nondischarge alternatives for treated wastewater disposal will become more prevalent. The nondischarge permitting program consists of all wastewater treatment, disposal, and/or collection systems that do not discharge directly to surface waters. The exception is wastewater disposal permits issued by DEH/Onsite Section for subsurface septic systems. Nondischarge systems are typically designed to treat wastes through land application techniques and therefore may contribute loadings as nonpoint sources. North Carolina regulations require that applicants for NPDES permits must first consider nondischarge alternatives. The state has over 1339 existing treatment and disposal nondischarge permits for activities including groundwater remediation, residuals disposal and reuse, spray irrigation, evaporation, infiltration and recycling. These complex systems often require intensive evaluation and site work and their numbers are expected to continue to increase. In addition, the state realized an increase in the number and size of animal feeding operations in the 1990’s. The state has approximately 2,400 permitted animal operations and the greatest number of large animal operations (i.e. concentrated animal feeding operations as defined in 40 CFR Part 122.21) in Region 4. More information on each program area is provided below.

North Carolina

2007
B-3 Basinwide Management

A basinwide plan is prepared for each river basin in order to communicate to policy makers, the regulated community, and the general public the state's rationale, approaches, and long-term strategies for each basin. The plans are circulated for public review and comment. To the best of DWQ’s abilities, based on available resources and staff, implementation of the plan is coordinated with local entities. Nonpoint source pollution reduction recommendations are presented in each plan to aid local and state groups in the development of site-specific restoration strategies. The plans are used as watershed restoration plans for many Section 319 restoration (incremental) proposals, as well as for proposals to the North Carolina Clean Water Management Trust Fund and for Ag Cost-Share Funds.

A portion of the funding under this activity will be used to support a basinwide planning position. The basinwide planner has responsibility for developing use support ratings, directing the planning, preparation, and finalization of basinwide water quality plans for selected river basins in the state. This responsibility includes public outreach and nonpoint education activities such as participating in public workshops and meetings, speaking to various interest groups, and coordinating with state and federal agency personnel and local watershed groups on plan development and implementation. The planner provides input into activities of local watershed groups and natural resource agencies, the NPS Team process, as well as point source discharger organizations similar to the Tar-Pamlico Association.

North Carolina

2007
B-7 Groundwater Program The major nonpoint source goals of the State aquifer protection program are to protect surface water from contaminants by preventing runoff of wastes to surface water, and controlling the movement of polluted shallow groundwater into surface water. Groundwater is a major contributor to the baseflow of streams. Prevention of contamination of shallow aquifers from a wide variety of waste disposal practices and chemicals from various land uses is necessary to protect water quality from many nonpoint sources. Uncontaminated groundwater baseflow in streams supports healthy assemblages of aquatic organisms and prevents eutrophication of receiving streams, estuaries, and watersheds. Knowledge of the chemical quality and hydrologic properties of shallow groundwater under a variety of land uses is necessary for establishing appropriate water pollution prevention policies. North Carolina 2007
B-8 Erosion and Sedimentation Control

The Division of Land Resources, Land Quality Section and the Sedimentation Control Commission have set funds for educational materials aside. However, these funds cannot be used for staff positions. Therefore, Section 319(h) funding is needed to support the Sediment Education Specialist to administer the education program. This position is located in the Division of Land Resources, Land Quality Section.

The primary function of this position is education and outreach. Measurable results include the number of people (contractors and the public) reached through workshops, conferences, and newsletters, as well as the number of information requests filled. The Sedimentation Education Specialist is also responsible for the revisions of the NC Erosion & Sediment Control Planning and Design Manual, which give guidelines on the best measures and design practices for erosion and sediment control. Sediment is the largest water pollutant, by volume, in the state of NC. Through education and training, this position aids in the control of erosion and sedimentation, thus positively impacting water quality throughout the state.

North Carolina

2007
C-3 Demonstration and Evaluation of Rainwater Harvesting/Cistern Technology The goal of this project is to highlight across North Carolina (coastal plain, sandhills, piedmont, and mountains) the many applications of water harvesting technology. Several uses for cisterns will be examined: washing emergency vehicles, washing agricultural equipment, irrigating a landscape, irrigating gardens, and toilet flushing. The “efficiency” of each use will be compared and data will be collected to help the State of North Carolina determine the amount of runoff reduction and nutrient removal credit that should be awarded the use of cisterns. An existing model will be further tested and refined based upon the data collected from several of the sites. A water harvesting website will be revised as well. A water harvesting fact sheet will be written and distributed via the website and at a series of 4 water harvesting workshops conducted across North Carolina. Through this demonstration and evaluation of water harvesting systems, the use of these innovative water management devices is expected to grow. North Carolina 2007
C-6 Certified Nutrient Management Training and Tool Support Certified nutrient management plans are critical to agriculture in North Carolina. This project would enable certified nutrient management planners to be trained, continue to update necessary nutrient management tools, such as the Phosphorus Loss Assessment Tool (PLAT) and the Nitrogen Loss Estimation Worksheet (NLEW), and provide outreach to producers on current nutrient management issues. Having certified planners and nutrient management tools are essential to the functions of both state and federal agencies: NCDENR- Division of Water Quality and Soil and Water and USDA-NRCS. In addition, this project would also provide necessary work on two issues that affect the build-up of phosphorus in soils: the need for starter phosphorus on soils testing very high in phosphorus and sludge application from lagoons. Recent results suggest, but do not clearly indicate, that starter phosphorus is not needed for corn and cotton on soils testing above 100 phosphorus index. If this suggestion is confirmed, we can dramatically reduce the amount of P applied in agricultural watersheds. In addition, some evidence suggests that sludge applied on a nitrogen basis will dramatically accelerate phosphorus, heavy metals (Cu and Zn) and even pH in soils. We need to be able to predict increases in phosphorus, heavy metals and pH based on soil type, current soil test levels, and content of these elements in sludge. This project will allow us to develop the necessary algorithms. North Carolina

2007

I-1 Community Conservation Assistance Program in Targeted TMDL Watersheds This grant application will help implement the Community Conservation Assistance Program (CCAP) in four selected watersheds with completed TMDLs in the Cape Fear, Catawba and Neuse River Basins. All requested funds will be used to install approved CCAP BMPs in the Lower Creek, Neuse River Estuary, Little Troublesome Creek and Muddy Creek TMDL watersheds. CCAP BMPs include rain gardens, critical area plantings, tree and shrub establishment, retention pond restoration, impervious surface removal, permeable pavement, grass swales, stream restoration, streambank stabilization, cisterns, pet waste receptacles and septic system repairs. North Carolina

2007

I-2 Robeson Creek Watershed Restoration Project The Robeson Creek Watershed is impaired for Total Phosphorus, Habitat Degradation, and Aquatic Weeds. Through this project, multiple BMPs are proposed for implementation throughout the watershed at targeted locations to address these impairments. Both urban and agricultural BMPs will be implemented throughout the watershed in critical areas determined by the TMDL Implementation Plan. Because this is a rapidly developing watershed, low impact development and stormwater ordinance education of local government and builders as well as an LID demonstration site is proposed to help stakeholders understand and prevent further degradation and actually work to improve stream health. Using the existing TMDL Implementation Plan, a watershed plan for Robeson Creek will be developed to assist stakeholders in making decisions about water quality measures. This study is currently underway and will define options for restoring the lake’s water quality and habitat. The Haw River Assembly (HRA) has been granted Section 319 funding for its Stream Steward Campaign in this watershed. HRA developed a stream stewardship guidebook for landowners, performed stream assessments within the watershed, surveyed local business and gave awards for good stream stewardship, and have hosted several workshops for landowner education regarding water quality. North Carolina

2007

I-4 Lockwood Folly Water Quality Restoration TMDL Development Project The entire Lockwood Folly River is listed as impaired waters by the NC Division of Water Quality. This 319 project builds upon work currently underway, and allows for refinement of these preliminary strategies to help assure that management actions will be effective and have the capacity to achieve compliance with federal Clean Water Act TMDL requirements for impaired water bodies. The TMDL-based management strategy that results from this project is likely to serve as a model approach for addressing impairment in other shellfish waters, and should provide valuable science-based guidance on how to address these widespread impairments without spending extremely limited time and financial resources developing detailed receiving water quality models for every water body. Specifically, this project aims at: (1) documenting sources and pathways that are currently delivering fecal coliform to impaired waters; (2) developing a workable TMDL for the river that supports and helps calibrate watershed management actions; (3) enabling watershed management strategy to cost-effectively target known and potential pollution sources and pathways; (4) engaging local decision makers and the public as partners in carrying out management actions by keeping them informed through on-going progress reports and press releases on project findings; (5) providing necessary data to help quantify how much emphasis must be placed on various elements of management strategies such as public education, stormwater discharge retrofits, post-development guidelines, land acquisition for preservation and restoration projects; and financial incentives for improved land use practices; and (6) promoting partnerships for implementing various elements of the watershed management strategy both through the direct participation of project partners as well as new partners such as the Clean Water Management Trust Fund. North Carolina

2007

I-6  Data Collection in Support of Upper Yadkin River Watershed-High Rock Lake Chlorophyll-a & Turbidity TMDL Modeling High Rock Lake is an impoundment of the Yadkin River and was constructed in 1929 to provide hydroelectric power.  It is owned and operated by the Yadkin Division of Alcoa Power Generating, Inc. (APGI). The lake has been monitored since the early 1970s, and has consistently shown a high level of eutrophication, with elevated chlorophyll a, nutrient concentrations, and dissolved gas levels. The lake also receives large inputs of sediment, which have reduced depth noticeably in some portions of the lake. The sediment load, combined with algal production and hydropower operation, result in turbidity problems throughout the lake. High Rock Lake has been placed on the 2004 North Carolina list of impaired waters for exceedances of the chlorophyll a and turbidity standards in the lake, and requires development of a Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL). The specific impairments are shown in Table 3. The objective of the proposed project is to collect the data necessary to develop, calibrate, confirm and apply a linked watershed-lake model required for development of the TMDL. North Carolina

2007

I-7 GIS Land Cover for the High Rock Lake Watershed, High Rock Lake TMDL High Rock Lake is located in Rowan and Davidson Counties in the Yadkin Pee-Dee River Basin, North Carolina and has been placed on the draft 2004 North Carolina list of impaired waters (303(d) list). Completion of the TMDLs for High Rock Lake will require the development of water quality models for nutrient response and watershed loading. The objective of this project is to develop the land cover for the High Rock Lake watershed. The land cover will be developed in a GIS format compatible with ArcView 3.X and ArcGIS. A 30 m grid cell will be utilized, similar to the 1992/93 land cover that DWQ currently utilizes. Additionally, this project will develop interfaces for water quality modeling purposes. The development of reasonable estimates of loading, and the sources of that loading, will be critical to the development of a nutrient management strategy. North Carolina

2007

I-8 Lake Jordan Paired Watershed Study Agriculture is an important land use in the Upper Cape Fear River Basin. This project, using a paired watershed design, will track 4 watersheds (2 pairs) for nutrients and sediments before- and after-rule implementation. Two of the watersheds will be located in the Cape Fear (one primarily pasture and the other primarily row crop). Two matched watersheds will be located in the Cape Fear and Yadkin Basins in the same major soil group. Monitoring will occur for total phosphorus, orthophosphate, total kjeldahl nitrogen, nitrate nitrogen, ammonium nitrogen, total suspended solids and fecal coliform. Both stormwater sampling using automated samplers, as well as monthly grab sampling will occur. The data will be paired for land use and an analysis done to determine 1) if land use affects nutrient or sediment loading rate, and 2) if rule implementation changes water quality data. To conduct this type of work, at least two years of pre-implementation data is required and 3 years of post-implementation. Due to the Department’s 3-year limitation on grants, we will conduct pre-implementation monitoring and only begin to obtain data on the post-rule implementation phase under this grant. North Carolina 2007
R-1  Town Lake Weed Control for Wetland Restoration This EPA Section 319 proposal aims to address the management program for the aquatic, semi-aquatic and terrestrial weeds that plague the project site. Over three years, an Integrated Pest Management (IPM) plan will be implemented to control the aquatic, semi-aquatic and terrestrial weeds. The IPM will employ appropriate herbicides in the upper lake to control weed growth without adversely impacting aquatic life as well as control semi-aquatic and terrestrial weeds in and around the restoration project. Because of the invasiveness and dominance of the exotic weeds, implementing the IPM to reduce and control weed infestations is necessary to allow native plants to establish in the emergent wetland and the surrounding riparian areas. Initial control and subsequent treatments will allow native vegetation to firmly establish and effectively out-compete residual invasive exotic vegetation at the site. Educational workshops, tours, and interpretive sign installation around the lake will contribute to citizen knowledge and support of this project. North Carolina

2007
Hills Creek WS WQ Improvement Project The Hills Creek watershed above its confluence with the Conway Branch and Lynches River has been targeted for fecal coliform bacteria reduction by the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC). Recreational and Aquatic Life Uses are not supported or only partially supported in portions of the watershed due to fecal coliform bacteria excursions. Increasing turbidity, pH fluctuations, and increasing fecal coliform bacteria trends are also seen in areas of the watershed. The presence of fecal coliform bacteria in aquatic environments indicates that water has been contaminated with fecal material of man or other warm-blooded animals. It is assumed that water bodies possessing high concentrations of fecal coliform bacteria may also be contaminated by pathogens, or disease producing bacteria or viruses, which can also exist in fecal materials. Some waterborne diseases associated with fecal material include typhoid fever, viral and bacterial gastroenteritis, and hepatitis A. Fecal contamination is frequently used as an indicator of potential health risks for individuals exposed to this water. Fecal coliform bacteria may occur in ambient water as a result of the overflow of domestic sewage or NPS of human and animal waste. South Carolina

2007
Nonpoint Source Compliance Inspections The Nonpoint Source Management Program identifies animal waste as a sig nificant nonpoint source threat to state surface and ground waters. In South Carolina, the majority of these wastes are manure from dairy, beef, poultry, and swine operations. South Carolina 2007
TMDL Development and Implementation SCDHEC uses a geographically based watershed approach for water quality management activities, known as the Watershed Water Quality Management Program (WWQMP). This program addresses point and nonpoint source pollution and allows water quality to be examined in a holistic manner. This project continues this program by providing staff support to identify NPS pollution problems, develop TMDLs, and develop GIS applications. South Carolina 2007
TMDL Implementation for FC Bacteria in Turkey Creek an Bullock Creek Watersheds The targeted areas in Turkey Creek (waters above sampling stations B-136, B-086, and RS-05562) and Bullock Creek (waters above sampling stations B-159, B-325, RS-05394) Watersheds have been documented by South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SC DHEC) as violating the water quality standard for fecal coliform bacteria and were placed on the 303(d) list for impaired water systems. Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) have since been developed for these areas. South Carolina 2007
Beaver Creek Restoration Initiative - University of TN Since its formation in 1998, the BEAVER CREEK TASK FORCE (BCTF) has been a collaborative effort to restore Beaver Creek and its tributaries to fully supporting their designated uses by implementing restoration practices and promoting sound economic development. Tennnessee 2007
Greene Co SCD - Holley & Richland Creeks Watershed Plan The Greene County Soil Conservation District is please to submit this proposal for grant funds to support the generation of Watershed Plans for Holley and Richland Creeks in the town of Greeneville and Greene County. The amount of this request is $20,000 to be used to contract with an independent contractor, for the generation of the Watershed Plan. Forty percent matching funds will be provided as in kind labor by the Soil Conservation District employees and the Middle Nolichuckey Watershed Alliance. Tennnessee 2007
Morgan County SCD - Crooked Fork Restoration Project The Crooked Fork Restoration Project has focused on assessment, education, partnership development and planning over the last 4 years. These efforts have built a strong foundation and adequate momentum to develop and implement a Watershed estoration Plan. The watershed was targeted as a priority within the Emory River Watershed due to its status on the 303(d) list, strength of partnerships, local citizens interest and the belief that we can be successful. The TMDL includes an implementation plan to address nonpoint sources that recommends the following steps:
  1. condnduct a detailed survey of impaired subwatersheds to identify additional sources of sediment loading.
  2. advocacy of local area ordinances and zoning that will minimize sediment loading to waterbodies, including establishment of buffer strips along streambanks, reduction of activities in riparians areas and minimization of road and bridge construction impacts.
  3. educate the public as to the detrimental effects of sediment loading to waterbodies and measures to minimize this loading.
  4. advocacy of agricultural BMPs (e.g. riparian buffer, animal waste management systems, waste utilization, stream stabilization, fencing, heavy use area treatment protection, livestock exclusion, etc.) and practices to minimize erosion and sediment transport to streams.
Partners and local volunteers have completed the first step of the TMDL implementation plan. In addition, a model has been developed to predict post-restoration sediment load reductions based on iterative interactions with the model. This project will implement steps 2, 3 and 4 of the TMDL implementation plan, address additional mine and barren land sediment sources and monitor for project effectiveness.
Tennnessee 2007
Pond Creek Protection and Water Quality Improvement Project The University of Tennessee Extension, in collaboration with other agencies in Tennessee, is proposing to expand a water quality improvement project in the Pond Creek watershed (TN06010202013) in the Upper Tennessee Basin of Eastern Tennessee. Agriculture in the Pond Creek watershed is typical of beef cow-calf and dairy systems in the Southeastern United States. Pond Creek is listed on the 303(d) list as an impaired stream in Tennessee for pathogens and nutrients. Dairy and beef cattle operations are the main agricultural activities in the watershed and are suspected to be responsible for much of the pollution. The project is seeking to address non-point source impairments in the Pond Creek Watershed and install best management practices (BMPs) and restore it to the condition of fully supporting its designated uses. Tennnessee 2007
TDEC/WPC Watershed Assessment Support - Monitoring This project will monitor watersheds located throughout the state.
The timely funding of the proposed projects will have several expected benefits that will immediately be realized:
  1. General qualitative assessment at the watershed level (BioRecon) will identify areas for further attention.
  2. Specific monitoring [single habitat approach (RBP3) and chemical analyses] at sites identified in BioRecon will provide more detailed information about the causes of nps impacts, and
  3. Fluvial geomorphology techniques will provide information about erosion and sediment of reference and impacted streams.
All selected sites will be mapped on GIS. Data, strategies, and watershed plans will be shared with cooperating organizations.
Tennnessee 2007

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