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Underground Storage Tanks Success Stories


Across the U.S., Underground Storage Tank sites have been cleaned up and reused successfully. Case studies describe successful UST projects and contain a great deal of information that can be applied to future projects.

Florida

Featured Success Story

After School Teen Center

EPA, along with the Florida Department of Environmental Protection and the City of Palatka and Putnam County have partnered in an effort to remediate an old gas station and turn the site over to the Florida Endowment Foundation for Florida’s Graduates for a teen center. This area of Palatka was at one time considered the jazz capital of Florida where future jazz greats played. Though neglected over the years, the area will now be transformed into a teen center where high school students could have a safe place to study.

Leveraging Florida’s State Response Program


Success Stories
Catastrophic Release due to Packer Ring Failure

Catastrophic Release due to Packer Ring Failure
State Line Zoomerz #73 - Bristol, TN PDF (2 pp, 183K)

Country Lane Estate - Frankfort, KY

Petroleum Contamination Cleanup
Country Lane Estate - Frankfort, KY PDF (8 pp, 952K)

Construction of Trench for Dye Injection

Construction of Trench for Dye Injection
Country Lane Estate - Frankfort, KY PDF (8 pp, 952K)

Former Lloyd's Service Station LUST Site in Hillsborough, NC

Former Lloyd's Service Station LUST Site in Hillsborough, NC
LUST Site Hillsborough, NC PDF (2 pp, 627K)

Cleanup of Villanow General Store

Cleanup of Villanow General Store
LUST Site; Lafayette, GA PDF (5 pp, 2.35MB)

Tennessee

State Line Zoomerz #73
Bristol, Tennessee

On the evening of September 19, 2012, the City of Bristol, TN Fire Department started receiving calls to 911 of gasoline vapors in private residences. The next day, the Public Works Departments in both Bristol, TN and Bristol, VA began tracing the sanitary sewer lines in the affected area for petroleum vapors. No petroleum vapors were found on the Virginia side of the state line, however, the sewer on the Tennessee side of the state line had vapors running from the Zoomerz #73 facility for about ¼ mile to the residences which had reported the problem. Due to the high level of gasoline vapors, one residence and one multi-use building, both on the property of a local church, had to be evacuated for several days.

State Line Zoomerz #73 - Bristol, TN (PDF, 2 pp, 183K)



Kentucky

Country Lane Estates
Frankfort, Kentucky

In July of 2005, the Kentucky Division of Waste Management declared an environmental emergency to address petroleum contamination and fumes that were being discharged from a spring in the Country Lane Estates residential neighborhood, located in Frankfort Kentucky. As part of the emergency action a treatment system was installed to intercept and treat groundwater from the spring.

Since 2007, the Division of Waste Management’s Underground Storage Tank has been coordinating additional soil and groundwater investigation in the area. As a result of these investigations, petroleum constituents above regulatory levels have been identified in groundwater monitoring wells on several residential properties in the Country Lane Estates subdivision.

In June of 2010 the Kentucky Division of Waste Management declared an environmental emergency in the Country Lane Estates neighborhood to address vapor intrusion issues in residential buildings as well as soil and groundwater contamination from petroleum constituents.

Country Lane Estate - Frankfort, KY (PDF, 8 pp, 952K)



North Carolina

Former Lloyd’s Service Station
Hillsborough, North Carolina

The former Lloyd’s Service Station site is located within the historic district and along the north entrance of Hillsborough, NC. The area in and around Hillsborough is home to at least 100 late 18th and early 19th century structures, and thus, the town of Hillsborough was very interested in not only redeveloping this property but also in preserving the façade and architecture of the vacant Sinclair Oil service station.

After the removal of seven USTs at the Former Lloyd’s Service Station in September of 1997, soil sampling revealed that a release had occurred at the site. The release was determined to have originated from three smaller USTs that were unknown prior to the excavation, and had been unused by the current owner of the site. Thus, there was no responsible party to fund cleanup of this site and it was admitted into the State’s Trust Fund Cleanup Program. Due to a risk ranking at this site that was below the action level for State Fund cleanup, contamination at this site was not likely to be addressed for many years.

LUST Site Hillsborough, NC (PDF, 2 pp, 627K)



Georgia

Villanow General Store
Lafayette, Georgia

Funds provided under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act were used to conduct UST removal, soil excavation, and groundwater remediation at a historic former gas station in Lafayette, Georgia.

Air sparge system located between the store and the stream

Cleanup of Villanow General Store
Air sparge system located between the store and the stream PDF (5 pp, 2.35MB)

The Villanow General Store was built in 1840 and is on the National Register of Historic Places under the name of Cavendars Store. The site is believed to have been one of the first gas stations in the area. The site is also adjacent to a feeder stream of Armuchee Creek and near several private water supply wells.

A remediation contract was awarded to Pangean-CMD Associates, Inc. to conduct the removal of four USTs and perform accelerated remediation using a chemical oxidation technique. This technique enhances degradation of groundwater contaminants by supplying an oxidizing agent in the treatment wells. This can reduce the amount of time that the air sparge remediation system has to run to reach the acceptable cleanup levels, and in the long run decreases the amount of energy used to reach the overall cleanup goals. This site successfully reached the required cleanup levels in late 2011.

 


LUST Site; Lafayette, GA (PDF, 5 pp, 2.35MB)

 


South Carolina

Arnold Steward Facility
Dorchester County, South Carolina

The Arnold Steward facility had 5 regulated USTs that contained kerosene, waste oil, and gasoline. The USTs ranged in size from 560 to 3000 gallons each and were last used in 1979. The UST owner, Arnold Steward, removed the USTs from the ground in August 2002.

Cleaninject trailer at SC contaminated site.

Cleaninject trailer at SC contaminated site.

During removal of the USTs, the presence of petroleum in the soil was identified and reported to the SC Department of Health and Environmental Control (The Agency) in October 2002. Subsequent to removal of the USTs, Mr. Arnold Steward passed away and the facility was designated as an orphan site. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funds were used to define the extent and severity of the petroleum. Computer fate and transport modeling was completed and Site-Specific Target Levels (i.e., clean-up goals) were established.

A solicitation was published by the Agency for contractors to submit bids for completion of a turn-key clean-up to meet the established clean-up goals. The winning contractor was Midlands Environmental Consultants, Inc. located in Lexington, SC. After Agency review of their Corrective Action Plan and completion of the public notice period, 12,000 pounds of a pulverized Activated Carbon product called GR-320-IRC was injected via 69 direct push points. Once injected, the carbon absorbs the petroleum effectively immobilizing it. The carbon then serves as a substrate for microbial growth and the micro-organisms regenerate the carbon in-situ. This project was funded with ARRA monies.

Learn more at prweb.com.

 


Charles and Mary’s Landing
Cross Hill, South Carolina

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act

In Cross Hill, South Carolina, Recovery Act funds cleaned up petroleum contamination from underground storage tanks that had been leaking into Lake Greenwood – a recreational boating and fishing spot. The tanks, filled with sand and left in the ground at the Charles and Mary’s Landing, had been used to fuel boats until 1978. In 2008, residents noticed a strong gasoline odor and visible sheen on the water as petroleum from the tanks leached into the lake and saturated the sediment around the sea wall. The Recovery Act funds helped with the removal of contaminated soil behind the seawall and excavation of contaminated bottom sediments from the lake itself. In order to allow for the excavation of the soil behind the sea wall, the sand-filled tanks were removed. The petroleum contamination is no longer affecting the environmental health of the lake and landing area, and it has returned to a vibrant fishing spot.

 


 

Indian Country
Success Stories
Cherokee Golden Eagle Facility

Cherokee Golden Eagle Facility

Cherokee Golden Eagle Facility Cleanup

Cherokee Golden Eagle Facility Cleanup

Cleanup of Choctaw Transit Facility

Cleanup of Choctaw Transit Facility

Indian Country


North Carolina

Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians, Cherokee Golden Eagle Facility
Cherokee, North Carolina

EPA Region 4 has been successful in getting work started again on the subject facility. This site originally had a release to the Oconoluftee River in 2006 and threatened the water intake to the Cherokee water treatment plant. At the time of the release, site investigation work was performed and some initial abatement/remediation was done soon after the release. Unfortunately, the responsible party (RP) had issues with their contractor and a misunderstanding with the State of North Carolina’s UST trust fund, causing all work to halt.

Because the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians (EBCI) has built an Immersion Center for schoolchildren behind the old facility and has plans for a greenspace at this location, it is important to proceed with cleanup as soon as possible. Region 4 was instrumental in bringing the RP, EBCI, and the State of NC together to iron out the details needed to restart work at the site. The RP’s new contractor has already submitted an updated Site Investigation, and is currently investigating/piloting remediation options at the site. All proposed work has to be pre-approved by the NC fund in order to qualify for reimbursement, but a proposed Corrective Action Plan is expected to be submitted to Region 4 for review by January, 2012.


Mississippi

Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians, Choctaw Transit Facility
Choctaw, Mississippi

In the spring of 2007, The Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians (MBCI) reported a suspected release of gasoline at their Choctaw Transit Authority facility. This release had the potential of endangering one of the tribe's community water wells, approximately 300 feet away. Without absolute proof of a release, the MBCI was having difficulty in convincing their insurance company to proceed with a site investigation or cleanup. The EPA Region 4 UST Section was able to provide support by having an initial site investigation performed by our Science and Ecosystem Support Division (SESD) out of Athens, GA. Utilizing this data, the MBCI brought in a contractor to do a more detailed site investigation, which determined that the release was contained to a relatively small area
of the facility. After consulting with EPA R4 UST staff, an over-excavation of soils was performed, yielding a clean site and a subsequent "No Further Action" at the facility.


 

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For information about the contents of this page please contact Linda Williams


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