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Drinking Water in New England

EPA New England's Water Supplier-Business Partnership Program

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Photo with caption: Mario Marini's farm in Ipswich, Mass plants cover crops, such as rye grass to prevent erosion of the soil into nearby public drinking water suppliesThe EPA New England's Water Supplier-Business Partnership Program encourages businesses to partner with their local water suppliers to prevent contamination of drinking water sources. Through the Source Water Assessment Program, New England states have begun evaluating the susceptibility of public drinking water sources to contaminants. Because businesses, both large and small, will be mentioned in the assessments as potential contributors of pollution, now is a critical time to encourage businesses to voluntarily partner with their local water suppliers to prevent contamination of drinking water sources.

Cover for the Drinking Water Protection Business Honors Program: Program Guidelines 2000-2001. Click for a larger image. EPA-New England Water Works Association Business Honors Program
Since 1996, EPA's New England Office has worked with the New England Water Works Association (NEWWA), a section of the American Water Works Association, to recognize extra efforts by New England businesses who protect our valuable drinking water supplies. Through the program, EPA has honored over thirty businesses which have actively worked to protect the quality of their local drinking water sources through improving their processes and land practices, assisting with local education and helping to protect critical lands from development. Examples of past honorees have included a golf course, retail stores, farms, manufacturers, real estate developer, hotel, and telecommunications company.

Brochure, "What Your Business Can Do to Help Protect & Secure Drinking Water Sources!" (PDF) (20 pp, 750 K)
This brochure is written for businesses and explains the Source Water Assessment Program and how it may relate to businesses. Common sense tips for minimizing negative drinking water impacts from business activities is included.

Brochure Cover: What Your Business Can Do to Help Protect & Secure Drinking Water Sources!

Business Source Protection Video
EPA's New England Office partnered with the New England Water Works Association, state source water protection managers, businesses and water suppliers to develop a video highlighting regional business efforts in source water protection. The video is available by contacting Ted Lavery at EPA's New England office. It includes case studies on different practices that can be carried out to lessen impacts to drinking water supplies, including: storm water treatment, land conservation, pest reduction management, and pollution prevention.

Best Management Practices for Drinking Water Protection
EPA has published a series of bulletins on best management practices (BMP) measures for activities that are likely to impact the sources of water used as drinking water. These bulletins are also used in conjunction with a source water protection training course. Bulletins address: stormwater runoff, septic systems, above and underground storage tanks, vehicle washing, managing small quantity chemical use to prevent contamination of drinking water, pet and wildlife waste, agricultural fertilizer, turfgrass and garden fertilizer application, large-scale and small-scale application of pesticides, and sanitary sewer overflows and combined sewer overflows.

Business Source Protection Workbook
This workbook includes case studies, best management practices and self-audit modules for agriculture, land development and construction, automotive repair shops, light industry, and consumer products businesses. The workbook will be distributed to business associations, public water suppliers and interested individual businesses through mailings and presentations at business association meetings.

Download the workbook

A hardcopy of the workbook is available by contacting Ted Lavery (Lavery.Ted@epa.gov or (617) 918-1683) at EPA's New England office.

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