Jump to main content.


Special Appropriation Act Projects (SAAP)

EPA is often directed to provide funding to a specific entity for particular study, purpose, or activity. These are not part of an established program and are limited to the special situations defined in EPA's annual Appropriations Act.

The majority of SAAP funding situations involve environmental studies, reports and demonstrations. Some are proposed by EPA and others are directed by Congress.

EPA does not, however, advocate or nominate drinking water, wastewater, or other water quality infrastructure projects for SAAP funding. If, however, you are a community or other entity which has been identified in one of EPA's Appropriation Acts to receive funding for drinking water, wastewater, or other water quality infrastructure projects, the information which follows will be of interest to you if:

  • you are responsible for getting the funding for the project, or
  • you will be responsible for overseeing the project to completion.

The information explains how you apply for the funding, get paid, and what your responsibilities are after you have received the funding. It contains links for getting the forms which must be completed. The forms can be completed on screen and printed for mailing. All information can be read on screen or downloaded.

Important Notice

The intention of this section is to provide you (the Grantee) with information that will help you to properly manage your grant. EPA's grant regulations are located under Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Parts 29 through 47. You must comply with these regulations in their entirety. Non-profits and institutions of higher education should pay particular attention to 40 CFR Part 30; State and local governments are governed by 40 CFR Part 31.

The information provided here is not intended to serve as a replacement for the grant regulations or for any federal statute that applies to your grant. Those authorities should be consulted to ensure compliance. The information provided at this site is simply designed to provide you with a better understanding of the regulatory requirements. To the extent that any information herein is inconsistent with any of the regulations, or with any statutory authority, the regulations and/or statute govern.

Table of Contents

1. How to Apply
2. Grant Application Form
3. Other Supporting Documents
4. Project Planning and Environmental Information
5. Sustainable Water Infrastructure
6. Mailing the Application
7. What Happens Next
8. The Rules
9. How the Grant is Paid
10. Enrollment in Payment Systems
11. How the Grant Funds May Be Used
12. How the Grant is Completed
13. Requesting the Final Payment
14. Review by State and EPA
15. Closeout of the Grant


1. How to Apply

Your community has been identified to receive a grant. To receive the grant, the community must fill out a grant application.

The grant application is a package of documents. It includes a form in which you formally request the grant. It also describes what your project is, contains a schedule for starting and completing the project, and provides information on compliance with Federal regulations applicable to the grant. EPA will review the application, and when the application is complete and approveable, the grant will be awarded to the community.

Top of page

2. Grant Application Form

The grant application form is four pages long. The first page is your official request (Standard Form 424) [pdf, 6 pages, 193KB, info about pdf]. Note that all applicants must provide their Dunn and Bradstreet (D&B) Data Universal Numbering System (DUNS) number. The number should be typed into the address block of box 5 of the Standard Form 424. If you do not have a DUNS number, click on the "Applications Forms" link and either call the toll-free DUNS Number or use the on-line web address. There is no cost involved to get a DUNS number.

The second page summarizes budget information for the project. The summary identifies the categories of activities you will fund with the grant. Infrastructure grants use Standard Form 424C. The last is a two-page certification that you will comply with all appropriate Federal regulations, policies, and requirements. The certification is Standard Form 424D.

All application forms can be reached through the "Application Forms" link on the left side of this page. Additionally, a "Helpful Hints for Completing the SF 424" [1pp, 30K, about pdf] guide can be reached in the "Links to Other Related Information" link.

It is important to note that these grants generally expect the community to provide a local cost share for their project. The local contribution is sometimes referred to as the "grant match" or "local cost share." The usual split is 55 % Federal grant funds with 45 % local dollars. This means that for each $1.00 of eligible project costs incurred, you are reimbursed $0.55 from EPA. Therefore, on the first page of the application (Standard Form 424), in space 15, it is important that you identify the source of funding you will use for the community's local cost share.

Possible sources of local cost share (i.e., the non-Federal grant match) include:

  • Private bond issues or bank loans
  • Revenue from tap fees and user charges
  • Community Development Block Grants
  • Rural Utilities Service Assistance
  • State or County grants
  • State or Revolving Loan Funds

If you will be using a loan from the state Clean Water or Drinking Water State Revolving Fund (CWSRF/DWSRF), you must advise the state CWSRF/DWSRF office of your plans. Some, but not all, loan funds available at the CWSRF/DWSRF can be used for your local cost share. The state CWSRF/DWSRF office can make sure your CWSRF/DWSRF loan includes the correct funds.

Acceptable sources of local match share include any federal assistance that specifically states in the funding Agency's regulations that the funds can be used to match other Federal grants. An example of this is the Community Development Block Grants.

Top of page

3. Other Supporting Documents

The following documents must be mailed to EPA along with the application forms. These documents explain how your project will be managed and completed:

1. The Project Workplan. This a a brief narrative description of what you are going to do with the funding. The Project Workplan should summarize 5 key aspects:

  • The existing circumstances (environmental and/or public health) that require correction.
  • The facilities that will be built to correct the problem.
  • The environmental and/or public health benefits (or "Outcomes") that the project will provide. Outcomes include both the relatively immediate changes that will follow after construction completion, as well as the longer-term difference (or consequence) that is expected to result from building the project.
  • The estimated total project cost, and
  • A project schedule for completing the major phases of the project, such as, bidding the contracts, awarding the contracts, construction start and finish, and final payment claim.

2. Appendix A, Certification Regarding Lobbying (self-explanatory). [pdf, 1 page, 27KB, info about pdf]

3. Standard Form LLL. Disclosure of Lobbying Activities.[pdf, 2 pages, 95KB, info about pdf] Use this form only if required by paragraph (2) on the "Certification Regarding Lobbying."

4. EPA Form 4700-4, Preaward Compliance Review Report . [pdf, 2 pages, 81KB, info about pdf] The information on this form will enable EPA to determine whether the applicant is developing projects, programs and activities on a nondiscriminatory basis as required by Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

5. Response from Intergovernmental Review (Executive Order 12372). The community must submit notice of its application to the State Single Point of Contact or area-wide clearinghouse. It can take up to 60 days for that office to review the notice. The community may request an earlier review from that office. The purpose of this process is to avoid any conflicts between your project and other projects in your state by making other agencies aware of your plans.

6. Please note that the grant application, Standard Form (SF) 424, requires applicants to have a resolution for the authorized representative signing the SF-424 on file. It gives Federal agencies the option of requiring the submission of the resolution with the SF-424. Region 3 does not require the submission of the resolution with the SF-424.

If, however, the authorized representative is changed, a copy of the new resolution must be submitted to the state infrastructure financing office and EPA. An authorized representative must be a member (employed or volunteer) of the applicant organization. Persons who provide contractual services such as outside accountants, engineers, consultants or attorneys cannot serve as authorized representatives.

Top of page

4. Project Planning and Environmental Information

Before awarding a grant for design or construction-phase work, EPA will review the project planning and environmental information.  This review examines whether the community has chosen a project that is cost-effective, environmentally sound, has public support, and is affordable.

If you are applying for a grant to pay for design and construction-phase work, you should include with the grant application package a copy of the engineering report(s) or studies that describe, evaluate, and recommend the proposed project.  If you believe that proper specific circumstances make it important that the grant be awarded before EPA's review of the project planning and environmental information, you should contact the state infrastructure financing office or EPA to discuss whether an exception is appropriate.

Another option is to first apply for funding of planning costs followed by a later award for design or construction costs.

Top of page

5. Sustainable Water Infrastructure

EPA, in partnership with water industry professionals, is working to fundamentally change the way the nation views and manages its water infrastructure because:

  • Drinking water and wastewater facilities (supply, treatment, distribution, and collection) represent large investments of local funds, and
  • The cost of maintaining water infrastructure is staggering.

EPA is encouraging local utilities to plan how to maximize the useful value of the new drinking water and wastewater facilities they are building. To help water utility managers, EPA is sharing information on best practices, tools, and techniques that can help utilities save electricity, conserve water, and maximize the useful life (value) of equipment. The water industry is beginning to use the term "sustainable infrastructure" to capture all three approaches.

EPA recommends all water utilities consider their equipment and facilities as their "assets", and shift from thinking in terms of maintenance (of the equipment) to management of their asset. Utilities will benefit by longer service life with reduced costs.

To learn more about maximizing the useful value and reducing the costs of water infrastructure, go to : http://www.epa.gov/waterinfrastructure/ and http://www.epa.gov/reg3wapd/infrastructure.

Top of page

6. Mailing the Application

After you have assembled all of these documents, you will mail them to the state infrastructure financing office which serves your community, or the EPA Regional Office, depending on what you were advised to do during your pre-application meeting with state and EPA representatives. (For example, applications for projects located in the District of Columbia and Pennsylvania should be mailed to the U.S. EPA Region 3, Grants and Audit Management Branch (3PM70), 1650 Arch Street, Philadelphia, PA 19103-2029, to the attention of Ms. Kathleen Blinebury, Grants Management Officer.) A list of EPA Region 3 state infrastructure financing offices is located at the end of this page.

The state infrastructure financing office will review the community's application and send it to EPA when everything is complete. EPA will mail the grant award to the community. A letter will ask that you to sign all three original copies of the grant agreement. One copy is returned to EPA and one copy is mailed to the state infrastructure financing office. You keep the third copy for your records.

Top of page

7. What Happens Next

Your community has received its grant. You are ready to use the grant to build your project. At this point it is important to know how you get paid and what your responsibilities are.

Top of page

8. The Rules

In accepting the grant award, the community agrees to comply with all applicable Federal statute, regulations and policies. Chief among the applicable rules governing your grant are EPA regulations at 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 31 and Office of Management and Budget Circular A-87. These are available through "Links to Other Related Material." If you have any questions about these standards, feel free to contact the EPA Office of Infrastructure and Assistance at (215) 814-5771.

Top of page

9. How the Grant is Paid

Most new grants awarded after May 2007 will be paid through the Federal Automated Standard Application for Payment (ASAP) system. ASAP is an electronic payment and information system that provides access to grant funds through the Internet or by telephone.

If the new grant project will be paid within a short period of time, or in one to three payments or the grant amount is very small ($100,000 or less), payment may be made through the Automated Clearinghouse/Electronic Funds Transfer (ACH/EFT) system. The ACH/EFT system is more suited to those payment conditions.

Prior to award of the grant, the EPA project officer and grantee will determine which payment system is suitable.

In order to receive payment through ASAP, enrollment in the ASAP system is required. Regardless of the number of federal agencies or programs providing funding to a grantee, only one enrollment in ASAP is required. See ASAP or ACH/EFT Enrollment.

Whichever payment system is used, the grant is paid on a reimbursable basis. A payment request may be prepared and submitted to the state oversight agency anytime after allowable costs have been incurred. For most municipal governments, departments and authorities, costs are considered "incurred" when posted to an accounting system as due and payable to a vendor. It is good business practice to submit requests for payment no more frequently than monthly.

Standard Form 271, Outlay Report and Request for Reimbursement for Construction Grants, is used to summarize all eligible project costs funded by the EPA grant. The completed SF271must be submitted to the state oversight agency or state infrastructure financing office for pre-payment review. Once the state agency approves the payment, EPA's Las Vegas Financing Center staff will authorize payment through ASAP or ACH/EFT.

Funds will be available for the grantee to draw from its bank account approximately 10 business days after the SF271 has been submitted to the state agency. For ASAP users, the system may be accessed at anytime to view account balances (availability of funds), account history, or the status of payment requests. ACH/EFT users should use the account access services provided by their bank to determine availability of funds.

Top of page

10. Enrollment in Payment Systems

1. How to enroll in ASAP

The grant recipient organization's authorized representative should contact Mr. Peter Puglisi at the EPA Las Vegas Financing Center (LVFC) after a signed copy of the grant agreement has been returned to EPA and the state oversight agency as directed in the Assistance Agreement/Amendment Notice. Mr. Puglisi can be contacted at 702-798-2426 or by e-mail at Puglisi.Peter@epa.gov. Mr. Puglisi should be informed if and when the recipient organization previously enrolled in ASAP. Once enrolled in ASAP, the system may be used for reimbursement of all of the grantee's federally-funded projects. Only one enrollment is necessary.

Whether an existing or new ASAP account is used, the state oversight agency or state infrastructure financing office must be authorized for "inquiry-only" access. Throughout the term of the project, the oversight agency assists EPA by monitoring grant financial status, maintaining awareness of the project's progress, and reviewing grantee requests for payment. The oversight agency will not approve grant payments without "inquiry-only" access to verify grant financial status.

Information on ASAP is available at http://www.fms.treas.gov/asap.

2. How to enroll in ACH/EFT

During the pre-application discussions about the grant from EPA, the grantee and project officer will determine if the project meets the criteria for this payment system. If the decision is to use the ACH/EFT payment system, approximately two weeks after EPA receives the signed grant agreement, Mr. Peter Puglisi will send the grantee an ACH/EFT enrollment packet for providing required banking information. The enrollment packet must be completed and returned to LVFC promptly.

Top of page

11. How the Grant Funds May Be Used

Grant funds may be used to fund various elements of an approved project. For example, you might decide to use the grant to pay for only the construction cost of the project. Or you might use it to pay for planning or other professional services. Finally, you might use it to pay for the cost of grantee's employees to administer the project. You might even use the grant to pay for portions of all of theses activities. Your application must identify which of these activities will be funded under the grant. Depending on what you choose to do, the following considerations would apply.

Top of page

If You Will Use Some or All of the Grant to Pay for the Contractor's Cost of Building the Project

Generally, this is the most straightforward situation. It has the smallest number of Federal requirements and reviews, and the smallest number of records you must keep track of and preserve.

There are five broad areas where you must coordinate your management of the project with EPA or the state infrastructure financing office: (1) project planning, (2) construction plans and specifications, (3) contractor selection, (4) oversight of construction, and (5) reporting.

1. Project Planning
EPA must review the planning information that the community used to select the proposed project. This review is required by the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The review will examine whether the community has chosen a project which is cost-effective, environmentally sound, has public support, and is affordable.
2. Construction Plans and Specifications
Before the community advertises for construction bids, the state infrastructure financing office must review the construction plans and specifications to make sure they contain certain Federally required contract language. Note that in some states this review is performed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.

3. Contractor Selection

You should ensure that your contracting activity complies with all of the requirements at 40 CFR 31.36 when performing any contracting action, whether acquiring a construction contractor or a professional service contractor. These regulations are designed to ensure efficient and economical use of federal funds by grant recipients who acquire goods and or services under a grant. We will attempt to cover some of those areas in the topics discussed below

EPA Disadvantaged Business Enterprise (DBE) Program - Grant recipients are required to make a special effort to alert the socially and economically disadvantaged business community (formally referred to minority and women’s business enterprise) about the opportunity to participate in Federally-assisted construction, professional service, or small purchase procurement.  Federal Regulations Title 40 Part 33 explains the solicitation and contract management expectations.  EPA and the state infrastructure financing offices will explain the requirements of the regulations, identify what a recipient must do, and provide examples of how the expectations can be achieved. 

The state office will conduct a pre-award review of the recipient's solicitation and procurement action.  This review is generally intended only to confirm that the recipient was aware of and understands its responsibilities under this rule.  Generally, the pre-award review will not examine specific actions taken by recipients during the procurement solicitation.  Some state offices may require additional documentation to be submitted because of state procurement requirements.  Nevertheless, EPA, as part of its oversight responsibility, may at any time review individual recipient procurement actions, including compliance with this regulation.  Recipients remain responsible for demonstrating how they met this requirement.


Construction contracts - Construction contracts can be advertised for bidding after the state infrastructure financing office has reviewed the construction plans and specifications. Unless approved beforehand by EPA, it is expected that a contractor will be selected through a formally advertised, competitive bid process, and will be the low responsible, responsive bidder, in accordance with 40 CFR 31.36(d)(2). Before the community awards a construction contract, the state infrastructure financing office will review the contractor selection process (including effort to solicit MBE/WBE) and the actual project bid costs which you will have to summarize on EPA Form 5780-1B, "Part B - Supplemental Project Information."

Professional service contracts - Professional service contracts (including contracts for architectural/engineering services) greater than $100,000 must be reviewed by the state infrastructure financing office, or EPA, before the contracts are awarded. Federal standards for the advertisement, evaluation, MBE/WBE solicitation effort and award of professional services contracts are found at 40 CFR 31.36(d)(3)(v).

Contract and Price Review - Grant recipients must perform a cost or price analysis of every contract, contract amendment (e.g., change orders), and purchase in accordance with 40 CFR 31.36(f). The degree of analysis may be different, but an analysis is required for all procurements. The choice and method depends upon the nature of the situation. As a starting point, the recipients should make an independent estimate of costs before receiving bids, proposals, or quotes. This will be used to determine the reasonableness of the proposed contract price.

A cost analysis considers the items which added together make up the price of a proposal. Items include salaries, overhead, travel, and subcontracts. A cost analysis is required whenever the advertisement or request for proposals requires cost information for use in the selection of the award. It is also required whenever competition is limited, such as when only one bid or quote was submitted and for all contract amendments or change orders, unless price reasonableness can be established based upon a catalog or the market price of a commercial product.

A price analysis considers the total price of each bid or proposal and is required in all other situations.

Grant recipients are required to negotiate profit as a separate element of the proposal price whenever a cost analysis is performed. A suggested, and optional, format for displaying proposal costs and profit is EPA Form 5700-41.

Small Purchases - Contracts and purchases less than $100,000 are not required to receive pre-award review by the state infrastructure financing office or EPA. Nevertheless, EPA strongly recommends that procurement actions be discussed with the state infrastructure financing office, or EPA, before the contract is executed. This will help prevent problems with acceptance of the costs for grant participation at the completion of the project. Federal standards for small purchases require an adequate number of quotes (generally three), an affirmative solicitation for Minority and Women's Business Enterprise (MBE/WBE), and a cost or price analysis appropriate to the situation. You need to maintain documentation of your efforts to solicit MBE/WBE participation.

Force Account - Grant recipients may use their own employees and equipment (Force Account) to perform project work. Recipients should check with EPA before performing design or construction work using force account services.

Code of Conduct - Grant recipients are required to maintain a written code of Standards of Conduct governing the performance of their employees who engage in awarding and administrating contracts. If you don't already have Standards of Conduct, you should develop one as soon as possible. A written code can help you and your employees avoid conflicts of interest when awarding and administrating contracts with grant funds. See 40 CFR 31.36(b) for more information on complying with this requirement.

Executive Order 13202 - Grant recipients must not use contract documents that contain provisions either requiring or prohibiting contractors from adhering to agreements with unions.

4. Oversight of Construction

On-site Inspection - Grant recipients are required to provide on-site technical inspection of infrastructure project construction. This is usually provided through a contract with an architectural/engineering business. If a grant recipient wishes to use its own employees (i.e., force account) to provide on-site inspection of the project, the recipient should request EPA approval before beginning the inspection work.

Project Oversight - The state infrastructure financing office, or the US Army Corps of Engineers, will periodically (usually monthly during active construction) meet with the grant recipient. The purpose of the review will be to evaluate the progress and assist the recipient in the management of the construction project. Items of interest are the recipient's on-site inspection effort, progress of construction, records management, and any special considerations which were identified in the EPA grant award.

The state infrastructure financing office, or the US Army Corps of Engineers, will conduct a final inspection of your project after construction is complete. The focus of this inspection is to confirm that the project has been properly constructed in accordance with the approved plans and specifications, and that the system is operating as designed.

Contract Changes - The state infrastructure financing office, or the US Army Corps of Engineers, will review construction change orders for funding with the grant award. The review will confirm that the work is within the scope of the grant-funded project, appears reasonable and necessary, and was properly documented. Change orders greater than $100,000 must be reviewed by the state infrastructure financing office or U. S. Army Corps of Engineers before an agreement with the contractor and grantee is reached.

5. MBE/WBE Reporting
After contracts or purchases are awarded, grant recipients need to report any MBE/WBE participation in the project, on a quarterly basis, to the EPA office. The reporting is recorded using EPA Form 5700-52A and a sample completed report is available.

Top of page

If You Will Use Some or All of the Grant to Pay for the Cost of Professional Services to Design or Plan Your Project

In many respects, this is similar to using the grant to pay for construction costs. The difference is that more records, in the form of invoices or time sheets, are involved.

Again, you must coordinate your management of the project with EPA or the state infrastructure financing office with respect to three principal areas: (1) project planning, (2) contractor selection, and (3) reporting. The issues are essentially the same as described in the preceding section.

Top of page

12. How Is The Grant Completed

Construction of your project is finished. You are finishing the last entries in your project records. At this point it is important to know how EPA closes its records of your grant.

Top of page

13. Requesting the Final Payment

When the community has received 90% of the grant amount, you will be sent instructions on how to prepare your request for final grant payment. Payments will be held at the 90% level until the request is reviewed. Your final request will be presented on the same Standard Form 271 you used for the earlier payment requests. Copies of all invoices and back-up documentation to support the full amount of the grant, including the final payment, must be submitted to the applicable office at that time. You must so include a certification that the grant-funded project has been completed. You must also certify that none of the Federal funds awarded to the grant were used to engage in lobbying the Federal Government or in litigation against the United States. The certification must be made using EPA Form 5700-53, which is available through the "Reporting Forms" link on the left side of this page.

Top of page

14. Review by State and EPA

The state infrastructure financing office or the US Army Corps of Engineers will review this package and make a recommendation to EPA of the amount of the final grant payment.

The EPA Office of the Inspector General may review EPA's records of your projects. If they do, you will receive a report which identifies any concerns or issues raised during the review.

EPA will prepare a final determination of project costs which are accepted for grant reimbursement. You will have an opportunity to resolve any questions which EPA identifies in its final determination.

Top of page

15. Closeout of the Grant

After all issues have been resolved, EPA will close its records and advise you to do the same. Note, however, that you must maintain your project records for a minimum of three years after the submission of the Final Payment Recommendation.

EPA's goal is that projects be completed within 5 years after award, and closed out within 7 years.

Top of page


STATE INFRASTRUCTURE FINANCING OFFICES
 

Drinking Water Grants

Wastewater Grants

DELAWARE Edward Hallock, Program Mgr. Division of
Public Health
DE Dept. Of Health & Social Services
P.O. Box 637
Dover, DE 19903
Street Address (for FedEx):
Jesse Cooper Building
Federal and Water Streets
Dover, DE 19901
Phone: (302) 741-8630
FAX: (302) 741-8631
email:Edward Hallock
ehallock@state.de.us
Terry Deputy, Administrator
Financial Assistance Branch
Division of Water Resources
DE Department of Natural Resources and
Environmental Control
5 East Reed Street, #200
Dover, DE 19901-7334
Phone: (302) 739-9941
FAX: (302) 739-2137
email: Terry Deputy
terry.deputy@state.de.us
MARYLAND Walid M. Saffouri , P.E. , Program Administrator
Water Quality Infrstructure Program
Water Management Administration
MD Department of the Environment
1800 Washington Boulevard
Baltimore, MD 21230
Phone: (410) 537-3757
FAX: (410) 537-3910
email:Walid Saffouri
wsaffouri@mde.state.md.us
Walid M. Saffouri , P.E. , Program Administrator
Water Quality Infrastructure Program
Water Management Administration
MD Department of the Environment
1800 Washington Boulevard
Baltimore, MD 21230
Phone: (410) 537-3757
FAX: (410) 537-3910
email:Walid Saffouri
wsaffouri@mde.state.md.us
PENNSYLVANIA

David G. Mittner, P.E.
Environmental Engineer Manager
Division of Technical & Financial Assistance
Pennsylvania Department of
Environmental Protection
PO Box 8467
400 Market Street
Harrisburg, PA 17101
Phone: (717) 787-0122
FAX: (717) 782-4474
email:David Mittner
dmittner@pa.us

David G. Mittner, P.E.
Environmental Engineer Manager
Division of Technical & Financial Assistance
Pennsylvania Department of
Environmental Protection
PO Box 8467
400 Market Street
Harrisburg, PA 17101
Phone: (717) 787-0122
FAX: (717) 782-4474
email:David Mittner
dmittner@pa.us

VIRGINIA Dale Kitchen, Project Supervisor
Office of Drinking Water
Virginia Department of Health
131 Walker Street
Lexington, VA 24450
Phone: (540) 463-7136 ext. 122
FAX: (540) 463-3892
email:Dale Kitchen
Dale.Kitchen@vdh.virginia.gov
Walter Gills, Program Director
Construction Assistance Program
VA Dept. of Environmental Quality
629 East Main Street
Richmond, VA 23219
Phone: (804) 698-4133
FAX: (804) 698-4136
email:Walter Gills
wagills@deq.virginia.gov
WEST VIRGINIA Robert DeCrease
Environmental Engineering Division
WV Bureau for Public Health
Office of Environmental Health Services
Capital and Washington Streets
1 Davis Square
Charleston, WV 25301-1798
Phone: (304) 356-4301
FAX: (304) 558-0691
email:Robert Decrease
robertdecrease@wvdhhr.org
Mike Johnson, Manager
State Revolving Fund Program
West Virginia Department Of Environmental
Protection
601 57th Street S.E.
Charleston, WV 25304
Phone: (304) 926-0499
FAX: (304) 926-0496
email:Mike Johnson
mjohnson@wvdep.org

Region 3 Home


Local Navigation


Jump to main content.