Jump to main content.


Photo Gallery - Construction

EPA Demonstrates a Viable and Sustainable Technology
to Treat Wastewater in Central America
US-EPA, Region 4, SESD, Athens, Georgia

[ Report | More Photos and Diagrams ]


An Inaugural plaque was dedicated at the completion of the project. The plaque includes the names of the main organizations responsible for the project; Environmental Committee of Puerto Barrios, Municipal Government, Corporate Housing Federation (CHF), United States Agency for International Aid (USAID), and the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA).

The photo shows the Inaugural plaque written in Spanish.


The demonstration wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) would be built along side the Escondido river treating the wastewater discharges emptying into the river.

The photo show the river Rio Escondido flowing through the town of Puerto Barrios.


The Puerto Barrios environmental committee in conjunction with US-EPA officials are shown here looking for a public site to build the demonstration site.

The photo shows the members of the environmental committee walking in a residential area located beside the river.


The site that was recommended for the construction of the number two WWTP.
A school is adjacent to the site.

The photo shows people looking at a small vacant area of land directly next to school buildings.


Walls of the recirculating sand filter and the two access ports to the pumping station.

The photo shows workers beside the walls of the concrete rectangular sand filter with the two square concrete access ports in the foreground.  The outside wall of the school is shown directly to the right of the sand filter.


A fenced shelter that was built to control access to the pumping station facility.

The photo shows a small shelter built of concrete blocks and surrounded by a high mesh fence with a barbed wire top.


The fuse box and the control box located inside the shelter.

The photo shows the metal fuse and control boxes mounted on a concrete block wall inside the shelter.


The control box controls the length of pumping cycles in the pump vault.

The photo shows the open control box displaying the electronic components.


The pump vault supports two pumps and the filter to protect the pumps.

The photo shows the pump vault that will be inserted into the pumping station.


Floats are used to control the operation of the pumps.

The photo shows the three floats attached along a small diameter pvc pipe being held by a worker.


The pump vault is inserted into the pumping tank and placed onto home made support brackets.

The photo shows the pump vault from above looking down into the concrete pumping tank.


The vault containing the pumps and the electrical box for the wiring from the pumps and the control floats.

The photo shows the pump vault and electrical box from above looking down into the concrete pumping tank.


Recirculating valve and float combination.

The photo shows the recirculating valve and float combination from above and water can be seen dropping into the pumping tank.


With the water level in the pumping tank high, the float plugs the return pipe and a percentage of the treated wastewater discharges to the Escondido river. Some treated wastewater falls back into the tank.

The photo shows the recirculating valve and a high water table.


Floor of the recirculating sand filter prior to being filled with the filter media. The floor and the walls are concrete.

The photo shows the rectangular shaped floor and walls of the recirculating sand filter as viewed from one of end of the structure.


The slotted discharge line for the treated wastewater in the middle of the sand filter.

The photo shows a small exposed portion of the return line without gravel covering running across the bottom of the sand filter.


The bottom layer of the filter media is composed of gravel.

The photo shows a thick layer of gravel covering the return line and the bottom of the sand filter.


The gravel used as media for the number one WWTP was obtained from a rock quarry mine.

The photo shows a close up view of an excavated mountain area.


The media used for the number two sand filter was harvested from a river.

The photo shows a shallow flowing river.


Filter number two view before installation of the distribution system.

The photo shows a rectangular shaped sand filter from one end and filled with filter media.


Influent line from the pumping station to the sand filter.

The photo shows a small diameter pvc pipe entering through the outside wall of a sand filter.


Installation of the distribution lines and the distribution valve.

The photo shows workers installing several lengths of small diameter PVC pipe on top of the sand filter media.


Installing orifice shields along the distribution line on Filter number 1. It is almost dusk after a long day of work.

The photo shows workers leaning down working with the piping on top of a sand filter.


A sand filter with gravel covering the distribution lines. The distribution valve cover can be seen in the middle of the unit. The gravel protects the PVC lines and helps in odor control.

The photo shows a sand filter topped with gravel and a cylindrical valve access cover protuding above the layer of gravel.


The photo shows an US-EPA Engineer viewing the uncovered distribution valve.

The photo shows a man kneeling on the gravel on top of a sand filter and looking at equipment exposed by the removed valve cover.


A closeup view of the distribution valve.

The photo shows a view from above of multiple pvc distribution lines coming together into the distribution valve.


[ Report | More Photos and Diagrams ]

If you need additional information or assistance,
contact Louis Salguero at (706) 355-8732 or (706) 355-8500
or via email at Salguero.Louis@epa.gov


Disclaimers

For further information about the contents of this page please contact R4SESDWeb@epa.gov


Local Navigation


Jump to main content.