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Hartford Area Hydrocarbon Plume Site

Site Information
  • Hartford, IL (Madison County)
Contact Information

Community Involvement Coordinator
Teresa Jones
(jones.teresa@epa.gov)
312-886-0725

Site Manager
Michelle Kaysen
(kaysen.michelle@epa.gov)
312-886-4253

On-Scene Coordinator
Kevin Turner (turner.kevin@epa.gov)
618-997-0115

Illinois EPA Community Relations Coordinator
Mara McGinnis (mara.mcginnis@epa.state.il.us)
217-524-3288

Illinois EPA Collinsville Regional Office, Manager
Chris Cahnovsky (chris.cahnovsky@epa.state.il.us)
618-346-5120

Illinois EPA Project Manager
Tom Miller
(tom.miller@illinois.gov)
618-346-5120

Illinois Department of Public Health
Edwardsville Regional Office
618-656-6680
Environmental Toxicologists
Cathy Copley (ccopley@idph.state.il.us)
Dave Webb (dwebb@idph.state.il.us)

Repositories

(where to view written records)

Hartford Public Library
143 W. Hawthorne
Hartford, IL 62048
(618) 254-9394

Hours:
Monday-Thursday 12-6 pm
Friday-Saturday 12-4 pm
Closed Sunday

Background

The Hartford Area Hydrocarbon Plume site is in the northern half of Hartford. U.S. EPA is investigating an area bounded by Olive Street to the east, Rand Avenue to the north, Old St. Louis Road to the west and Hawthorne Street to the south. In June 2003, U.S. EPA took over the site at Illinois EPA’s request. U.S. EPA oversees the investigation and cleanup of the village property, and the state agency oversees the adjacent oil refinery property.

The hydrocarbon contamination, which includes gasoline and diesel fuel, has been attributed to numerous releases over many years from adjacent oil refineries and pipelines. Once released, the contamination migrated down through the soil until it hit the groundwater. Due to the rise and fall of groundwater by several feet, the contamination has moved up and down. It is now trapped between soil and water deep below the surface. This makes cleanup very difficult; however, U.S. EPA continues to look for the best ways to finish the cleanup.

Beginning in 2005, the oil companies installed – in three phases – an extensive, village-wide system to extract vapor from the soil. It’s a network of 120 vapor-removal wells connected by pipes that take gasoline vapors from beneath the village to treatment units on the refinery property. This system protects residents by keeping vapors from entering their homes, and also removes much of the gasoline trapped in shallow soil. U.S. EPA is looking into expanding the system, which has already removed almost 1 million gallons of contamination.

Some liquid gasoline has been removed through skimming, which is simply removing gasoline from a well on a regular basis. Although this technique has been successful, it can only remove a small amount of liquid at a time, so it’s ineffective for cleaning up the entire plume.
U.S. EPA is trying to find the best way to remove the liquid gasoline that is trapped about 30 feet beneath the ground. One method being tested is to pump groundwater far enough down to allow the gasoline to flow into a collection well. This must be done when both the groundwater and Mississippi River are at low levels.

The Agency continues to direct the oil companies doing the cleanup, while working with the Village of Hartford and the community to ensure it’s done in a safe and effective way.

Site Updates | Fact Sheets || Technical Documents || Legal Agreements || Public Meetings | Photos


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Site Update

August 2014

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is overseeing several oil companies while they clean up gasoline pollution lying beneath the village of Hartford. The oil companies are both removing gasoline and studying the most effective ways of eliminating more. A vapor removal system was installed in the village for that purpose. The Hartford Working Group, or HWG, is the name of the three oil companies that installed the vapor system and currently runs it. In-home monitoring performed by a fourth oil company, Apex Oil, also verifies residents are safe from fumes. Apex is the company responsible for designing the final cleanup plan.

Fact Sheets

Technical Documents

Legal Agreements

Public Meetings

Photos

Some wells like this one have already been installed in Area A, where the test pumping will be done.

Some wells like this one have already been installed in Area A, where the test pumping will be done.

 


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