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Kiser Plating

Site Information
  • Muncie, IN (Delaware County)
  • EPA ID# IND984891879
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Contact Information

Community Involvement Coordinator
Teresa Jones
(jones.teresa@epa.gov)
312-886-0725 or 800-621-8431, ext. 60725

On-Scene Coordinator
Shelly Lam
(lam.shelly@epa.gov)
317-417-0980

Repositories

(where to view written records)

Maring-Hunt Library
2005 S. High St.
Muncie, Ind.

Background

The Kiser Plating Site is located at 401 East Howard St. in Muncie. The site is located on the southeast side of downtown Muncie in an area that is a mixture of commercial, residential and industrial properties. Approximately 10,000 residents live within one mile of the nearly 3/4-acre site.

Kiser Plating operated as a plating shop from 1911 until 1999. It operated under the names Muncie Jewelry and Plating Works, J.F. Kiser Company Plating Works, and Shear-Line Golf. Former operations included plating silver tableware, gold and silver jewelry, golf clubs, and military parts for World Wars I and II, the Korean War, and the Vietnam War. Prior to 1911, it operated as Muncie Heat Light and Power Co., Muncie Electric Light Co., a hay warehouse and Muncie Bagging Co. A fire destroyed all but one of the properties in 2001. The city of Muncie demolished one remaining building between 2010 and 2011. The site is currently vacant.

In 2008 and 2009, samples taken by the city of Muncie identified contamination in the soil and ground water at the site which included arsenic and volatile organic compounds. VOCs can be harmful to people and the environment. At the request of the city of Muncie, EPA did a site assessment in November 2012 and collected soil and soil gas samples. Metals and VOCs were detected.

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Site Updates

March 2014

In June 2013, EPA started to clean up the site. Activities include removing contaminated soil, backfilling excavated areas, and transporting and disposing of hazardous substances in an off-site facility. Besides removing contaminated soil, EPA tested indoor air at selected properties near the site for an environmental problem known as "vapor intrusion." The tests will detect the presence of potentially harmful gases that may be moving up through the soil and into properties through cracks or holes in basements and crawl spaces. If there is a vapor intrusion problem, vapors can be removed by installing a "mitigation" system that would vent vapors outside the properties.

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