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Stephen Klaine, Ph.D.

Dr. Stephen Klaine is a professor in the Department of Biological Sciences and Director of the Institute of Environmental Toxicology (CU-ENTOX) at Clemson University. He received his doctorate from the Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Rice University in 1982 and has spent over 25 years conducting environmental research and educating graduate students. He has 30 Ph.D. and over 40 M.S. graduates from his laboratory. He has served on the board of directors of the Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry and has been an associate editor for the journal, Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry for 15 years. He has been on the editorial board of the journal, Nanotoxicology, since 2009. From 1995 to 2000, he was the only US participant on a multinational International Atomic Energy Agency Cooperative Research Program on Pesticides in Coastal Tropical Ecosystems. In addition to building capacity in tropical countries around the world this group produced the first book to compile pesticide use and effects information in tropical countries. Klaine was a co-editor of this book. Klaine has served on several US EPA Science Advisory Panels and workshops dealing with pesticide and metal fate, effects, and risk assessment. He has also served on the NRC panel to review the National Nanotechnology Initiative Strategy on Environmental and Human Safety Needs for Nanomaterials. He has served on the NIEHS review panel for the Superfund Basic Research Program since 1995 and chaired the panel in 2007 and 2008. He has severed on several other proposal review panels for the US EPA, USDA, and NIEHS. He has been a Sigma Xi National Lecturer, won the Clemson University Sigma Xi researcher of the year in 2007, and won the Clemson University Alumni Award for Outstanding Research in 2009. He has over 110 peer-reviewed publications on research ranging from the bioavailability and toxicity of pesticides and metals to pesticide risk assessment, to the environmental behavior and toxicity of nanomaterials. Current research in his laboratory focuses on characterizing 1) the bioavailablity of metals and pesticides in aquatic systems; 2) the comparative phytotoxicity of pesticides; 3) the response of aquatic organisms to episodic contaminant exposures; 4) the water quality consequences of land use; 5) the effects of pharmaceuticals on fish behavior; and 5) the bioavailability and toxicity of colloids and nanoparticles in aquatic systems.


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