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Field Trips

What's New?
  • Registration is now open! Click here to register to attend the training conference in Atlanta.
  • If you cannot attend in person, click here to register for the online streaming sessions.
  • The room block at the Sheraton is now open. Reservations must be made by July 3, 2015, to receive the group rate. Click here to make reservations.
  • There are still slots available for the Eco Café. If you are interested in participating, please visit the Eco Café page.

Tuesday Afternoon, August 4, 2015

Proctor Creek (2:45 - 5:45 p.m.)

Proctor Creek flows through Northwest Atlanta from downtown to the Chattahoochee River. The 23-square-mile watershed has a population of >51,000 people living in more than 38 neighborhoods, and it primarily traverses five City of Atlanta neighborhood planning units (NPUs). The creek used to be a source of pride for NW Atlanta communities—a place where children played, where people fished, and where people were baptized. Today, however, Proctor Creek is highly impacted by pollution and other stressors and does not meet its designated use for fishing.

Despite a rich cultural legacy, many of the watershed's residents, who are primarily African American, experience social and economic disparities. After decades of public disinvestment and neglect, these residents are faced with multiple environmental challenges that may pose health risks, including: illegal dumping, impaired water quality, aging sewer infrastructure, brownfields, and pervasive flooding.

What was once a "forgotten" area of the City of Atlanta is now the subject of intense focus from multiple government stakeholders; academic institutions; local and national non-profits; and private developers in addition to residents and community organizations that have invested decades of sweat equity and activism to revitalize the watershed. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency recently selected Proctor Creek for the Urban Waters Federal Partnership, and a resident-led organization, the Proctor Creek Stewardship Council, has been established to harness collective assets, power, and voice among residents to ensure that solutions sought by other stakeholders are driven by community needs and include authentic engagement and principles of collaborative problem-solving.

This tour will take participants to this local waterway for a walking tour to examine trouble areas (i.e., flooding, erosion, and pollution) and discuss community efforts and other collaborative action to lessen these challenges.

Key topics discussed on this tour:

  • Community activism and engagement
  • Environmental justice
  • Successful citizen science initiatives
  • Workforce development
  • Flood prevention and green infrastructure
  • Public health near waterways
  • Pollution control
  • Investment and policy solutions

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The Atlanta BeltLine Tour (2:45 - 5:45 p.m.)

Registered conference attendees will board one of the Atlanta BeltLine, 30-Passenger Buses and have a guided tour of the entire, 22-mile BeltLine corridor.

The Atlanta BeltLine is the most comprehensive transportation and economic development effort ever undertaken in the City of Atlanta and among the largest, most wide-ranging urban redevelopment programs currently underway in the United States. The Atlanta BeltLine is a sustainable redevelopment project that will provide a network of public parks, multi-use trails, and transit along a historic 22-mile railroad corridor circling downtown and connecting many neighborhoods directly to each other.

The Atlanta BeltLine is transforming the city with a combination of rail, trail, greenspace, housing, and art. It will ultimately connect 45 intown neighborhoods, provide first and last mile connectivity for regional transportation initiatives, and put Atlanta on a path to 21st century economic growth and sustainability. The beauty of the Atlanta BeltLine is that it offers not only modern conveyances and exciting new development, but it is a living, breathing part of our community; not simply a means of getting somewhere, but a destination unto itself. It offers a chance for Atlanta to redefine what it is to be a neighbor, to be a community, to be a region, and to share all that it has to offer.

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Wednesday Afternoon, August 5, 2015

The Atlanta BeltLine Tour (1:00 - 4:00 p.m.)

Registered conference attendees will board one of the Atlanta BeltLine, 30-Passenger Buses and have a guided tour of the entire, 22-mile BeltLine corridor.

The Atlanta BeltLine is the most comprehensive transportation and economic development effort ever undertaken in the City of Atlanta and among the largest, most wide-ranging urban redevelopment programs currently underway in the United States. The Atlanta BeltLine is a sustainable redevelopment project that will provide a network of public parks, multi-use trails, and transit along a historic 22-mile railroad corridor circling downtown and connecting many neighborhoods directly to each other.

The Atlanta BeltLine is transforming the city with a combination of rail, trail, greenspace, housing, and art. It will ultimately connect 45 intown neighborhoods, provide first and last mile connectivity for regional transportation initiatives, and put Atlanta on a path to 21st century economic growth and sustainability. The beauty of the Atlanta BeltLine is that it offers not only modern conveyances and exciting new development, but it is a living, breathing part of our community; not simply a means of getting somewhere, but a destination unto itself. It offers a chance for Atlanta to redefine what it is to be a neighbor, to be a community, to be a region, and to share all that it has to offer.

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Atlantic Station (1:00 - 5:00 p.m.)

Registered conference attendees will board a chartered bus and be transported over to Atlantic Station, where they will take a walking, guided tour of this major, mixed-use development. Atlantic Station is a mixed-use neighborhood development on the northwestern edge of Midtown Atlanta comprising a vibrant retail district, office space, condominiums, townhomes and apartment buildings. First planned in the mid-1990s and officially opened in 2005, the neighborhood's 138 acres are located on the former brownfield site of the Atlantic Steel mill. Atlantic Station has since become the downtown destination for festivals, shopping, dining, and entertainment.

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