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Sites in Reuse in Connecticut

Barkhamsted-New Hartford Landfill
Site photo

The 98-acre Barkhamsted-New Hartford Landfill Superfund site is located near the Barkhamsted and New Hartford town line in Barkhamsted, Connecticut. In the 1970s, the unlined landfill accepted municipal and industrial wastes. These wastes included oily metal grindings and sludge containing heavy metals. The site also served as a barrel-crushing and metal reclamation operation. In 1983, a state inspection found leaking drums containing hazardous solvents on site. Tests found that site operations had contaminated ground water under the site with volatile organic compounds (VOCs). EPA listed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in October 1989. In the fall of 1999, the landfill owner installed a landfill cap, a runoff and landfill liquid collection and treatment system, and a system to capture landfill gases. EPA issued a Record of Decision (ROD) for the ground water remedy in September 2001. EPA’s cleanup plan included natural attenuation and long-term monitoring of ground water, long-term monitoring of surface water and sediment and institutional controls to prevent ingestion of and contact with contaminated ground water. Today, the site supports uses including an active waste transfer station, recycling area and a maintenance and office building.
Updated 10/2013

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Cheshire Ground Water Contamination

From 1966 to 1980, two companies manufactured plastic molding at the 15-acre Cheshire Ground Water Contamination site in Cheshire, Connecticut. These operations contaminated the soil and ground water with organic chemicals and solvents, and in 1990 EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL). Cheshire Associates, under state and EPA orders, cleaned up the site by removing 20 cubic yards of contaminated soil. EPA extended the public water supply to residents with drinking water wells impacted by site contamination. Carten Controls, a subsidiary of Fujikin of America, Inc., relocated to the site in 1996. EPA removed the site from the NPL in 1997. Currently, Carten Controls continues to manufacture ultrapure valves and fittings for the semiconductor industry including carburetors, pistons, rings, valves, and pipe fittings at the site.
Updated 1/2013

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Durham Meadows

The Durham Meadows Superfund site is located in Durham, Connecticut. Durham Manufacturing Company, established in 1922, and Merriam Manufacturing Company, established in 1851, manufactured metal cabinets, boxes and other items on site. Merriam Manufacturing Company relocated its operations after its facilities burned in 1998. Improper storage and disposal practices contaminated site soil and ground water. In 1982, the Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection found volatile organic compounds in nearby private drinking water wells. Merriam Manufacturing Company and Durham Manufacturing Company installed filters on impacted residential wells. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989. Cleanup activities include providing an alternate water supply for affected residents, digging up and removing soil, monitoring and containing ground water contamination, putting land and ground water use controls in place, and investigating areas with possible indoor air risks. The Durham Manufacturing Company continues to manufacture metal boxes on site. Cleanup for the parcels in the Merriam Manufacturing Company area of the site is now complete. Cleanup activities for this area included digging up and removing soil for off-site disposal. These cleaned up parcels are currently for sale and available for redevelopment. The Agencies are work with the responsible parties to put final land and ground water use controls in place.
Updated 10/2013

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Gallup's Quarry Alternative Energy

The Gallup's Quarry Superfund site is a 29-acre abandoned gravel pit located in a rural area of Plainfield, Connecticut. Contamination at the site dates back to the 1970s when the site owner accepted chemical wastes without a permit. The owner allowed the dumping of drums and free liquids at the site. This unpermitted disposal led to site-wide soil and ground water contamination. After the Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection removed waste drums and contaminated soil, EPA added the site to the Superfund program’s National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989. EPA further studied the extent of site contamination and selected a cleanup plan of long-term monitoring and land use restrictions. Soil and ground water monitoring continue at the site. EPA restricted land use to industrial purposes. Today, the site is home to the Plainfield Renewable Energy biomass facility. The biomass power plant uses waste wood to generate 37.5 megawatts of clean energy. This is enough to power about 40,000 homes in Plainfield. Connecticut Light & Power purchases 80% of the generated energy under a 15-year agreement, while the remaining energy contributes to the regional renewable energy certificate market. Construction of the biomass plant reached completion in December 2013, and it became fully operational in January 2014.
Updated 10/2014

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Linemaster Switch Corporation

The 45-acre Linemaster Switch Corporation site in Woodstock, Connecticut has manufactured electrical and pneumatic foot switches and wiring harnesses since 1952. Operations involve the use of trichloroethylene (TCE), paint and thinners which resulted in ground water, sediment, surface water and soil contamination at the site. In 1990, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL). Cleanup activities included the installation of soil and ground water treatment systems. Today, the Linemaster Switch Corporation continues manufacturing electrical power switches, air valves, electrical cord sets and metal name plates at the site while the ground water treatment system remains in operation. Residential and commercial properties are located adjacent to the site.
Updated 1/2013

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Precision Plating Corp.

The 3-acre Precision Plating Corp. Superfund site is located in Vernon, Connecticut. A chromium plating company (formally known as Precision Plating Corporation) is one of several tenants in Hillside Industrial Park, a small industrial complex. Since 1970, this chromium plating facility has been chrome plating various metal parts and fixtures on site. Wastes generated during this process include rinse waters containing heavy metals, batch wastes of alkaline cleaner and spent plating and etching acids. Before 1983, site operators discharged rinse waters to a storm drain outside the building and stored process plating acids and chrome plating wastes in drums and in a 500-gallon tank. In 1979, Vernon’s Health Department found chromium contamination in the ground water well serving the Hillside Industrial Park. The agency determined the cause to be the rupturing of drums and a storage tank by a snow plow. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989. Initial cleanup activities included connecting nearby residences to a public water supply, removing contaminated soil and monitoring ground water. While the Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection initially began investigations of the remaining contamination, in 2010, EPA became the lead agency to continue this work. The first phase of the Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study is due to be completed in 2015. A proposed cleanup plan is expected in 2016. The chromium facility continues to operate on site.
Updated 10/2013

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Raymark Industries, Inc.
Site photo

The Raymark Industries Incorporated Superfund site includes over 500 acres near the Housatonic River in Stratford, Connecticut. From 1919 until 1989, Raymark and other companies manufactured automotive brakes, clutch parts and other friction components used in the automotive industry. Operations disposed of manufacturing wastes on site, on nearby residential, commercial and municipal properties, and in the wetlands adjacent to the Housatonic River. Waste handling practices resulted in contamination of soil and ground water. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1995. Cleanup activities included digging up and removing contaminated soil and waste, capping, vapor extraction and site access restrictions. People near the site do not currently use ground water for drinking water purposes, but between 2003 and 2004, EPA installed over 100 sub-slab ventilation systems in homes to mitigate vapor intrusion of volatile organic chemicals. EPA integrated reuse considerations into its cleanup activities and constructed a cap over the entire 34-acre parcel in a manner that allowed for redevelopment of the property while ensuring the continued containment of the underlying contamination. EPA awarded the site a Superfund Redevelopment pilot grant in 2001. The Stratford Crossing Shopping Center, completed in 2002, currently occupies 34 acres of the site and provides a mixed green and commercial space. The community enjoys access to several commercial businesses including Home Depot, ShopRite Supermarket, Walmart and Webster Bank.
Updated 1/2013

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Scovill Industrial Landfill
Site photo

The 30-acre Scovill Industrial Landfill Superfund site is located in Waterbury, Connecticut. From 1919 until the mid-1970s, the Scovill Manufacturing Company used the site as a landfill for the disposal of ash, cinders, demolition debris and other wastes. By the mid-1990s, developers had built condominiums, apartment buildings, small commercial buildings and a shopping mall on the 23-acre southern portion of the site. The northern portion of the site is an undeveloped 6.8-acre parcel, referred to as the Calabrese parcel. This parcel was in the early stages of development for a proposed elderly housing complex when excavation activities uncovered industrial wastes on site. Cleanup activities have included the removal of contaminated soil and waste on the surface of the Calabrese parcel, placement of a temporary cap, installation of fencing, and indoor air sampling. EPA did not detect any contaminants in the indoor air. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 2000. In 2004, EPA provided assistance to the City of Waterbury to undertake a reuse planning process for the site and to develop future land use recommendations for the undeveloped Calabrese parcel. EPA is in the process of completing the site investigation, which will determine if additional cleanup activities are necessary.
Updated 2/2014

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