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Superfund


   

Sites in Reuse in Maine

Eastern Surplus
Site photo

The Eastern Surplus Company Superfund site occupies approximately 5 acres of land along Meddybemps Lake and Dennys River in Meddybemps, Maine. Eastern Surplus operated as an army surplus and salvage retailer from 1946 until the early 1980s. A site inspection of the facility in 1984 noted chemical odors, leaking electrical transformers, compressed gas cylinders, hundreds of deteriorating drums and containers, 16,000 pounds of calcium carbide and numerous areas of stained soil. Site contamination threatened local active fisheries and spawning areas. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1996. EPA removed contaminated soil and materials, disposed of it off site and began operation of a ground water treatment system in 2000. Investigations during remedy implementation at the site identified Native American artifacts and EPA determined the northern portion of the site as eligible for the National Register of Historic Places. This area, the N’tolonapemk Village, is now a major archaeological research site for the history of the Passamaquoddy people. A seasonal home currently occupies the southern portion of the site and EPA anticipates continued residential, light commercial and agricultural use of this area.
Updated 1/2013

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Eastland Woolen Mills
Site photo

The 22-acre Eastland Woolen Mill Superfund site, located on Main Street in the heart of Corinna, Maine, includes the area where a textile mill operated from 1909 until 1996. Operations discharged process wastes containing contaminants such as chlorobenzenes into the East Branch of the Sebasticook River, which flowed underneath one of the mill buildings. Disposal practices resulted in contamination of river sediments, soil and ground water. In 1999, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) and began cleanup activities at the site. EPA’s close coordination with the local community ensured the productive reuse of the optimally-located property. In 2001, EPA’s Superfund Redevelopment Initiative provided a grant to the Town of Corinna for a community-based reuse assessment and reuse plan. Based on these plans, a 20-unit senior housing facility opened on a portion of the site in 2006. Additionally, EPA, the Town of Corinna and the State of Maine relocated the historic Odd Fellows Building to the site and the building currently operates as a country store and restaurant. The Town of Corinna War Memorial, a community bandstand and a community boardwalk through a greenspace along the river are also located on the site. The remainder of the site incorporates commercial, residential and mixed-use development. In 2012, EPA deleted 80 percent of the site’s land area from the NPL after determining that those areas had been remediated. Site stakeholders hope the deletion will add further clarity to the site’s remedial status and facilitate even more reuse.
Updated 8/2013

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Loring Air Force Base Green Infrastructure

Located in Limestone, Maine, the Loring Air Force Base served as a major Strategic Air Command (SAC) base for the U.S. Air Force for over 40 years until its closing in 1994. The Base housed a bomber wing and had SAC’s largest capacity for weapons and fuel storage. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List in 1990 due to contamination from waste oils, fuels cleaned from aircraft and vehicles, spent solvents, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), pesticides and three on-site landfills. Following the completion of cleanup activities, stream restoration activities took place, returning the stream to its natural condition. Later, the Air Force donated the site to the Loring Development Authority. The Loring Development Authority worked with the Air Force and EPA to establish the Loring Commerce Center, an industrial complex, aviation center and business park, on the 8,700-acre site. Private businesses and federal agencies within the commerce center provide employment and income for the surrounding community. Tax credit and exemption programs, such as the Job and Investment Tax Credit and the Research Expense Credit, offer additional incentives to potential new tenants. Redevelopment at the site serves as a success story for other Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) facilities.
Updated 1/2013

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Pinette's Salvage Yard
Site photo

The 12-acre Pinette's Salvage Yard Superfund site is located about one mile southwest of Washburn, Maine. In 1979, three electrical transformers removed from Loring Air Force Base and brought to the site for disposal broke during removal from the delivery vehicle. About 1,000 gallons of fluids containing polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) spilled directly onto the ground. The fluids moved through the soil, contaminating ground water and surface water with PCBs. In December 1982, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL). In 1983, as part of a removal action, EPA excavated about 1,050 tons of PCB-contaminated soil and transported it to a federally-approved disposal facility. EPA’s cleanup plan for the site, issued in a 1989 Record of Decision (ROD), addressed contaminated ground water and the remaining contaminated soil. Cleanup activities included off-site burning and on-site solvent extraction of PCB-contaminated soil, treatment of over 100,000 gallons of contaminated ground water, and ground water monitoring. EPA changed the remedy in 1993 to allow for off-site disposal of all remaining soil in a regulated landfill. Ground water restrictions currently prevent people from drinking contaminated ground water. Following the successful cleanup of the site, EPA deleted it from the NPL in September 2002. EPA’s cleanup plan allowed part of the site to continue operation as a vehicle repair and salvage yard throughout cleanup activities. Today, the vehicle repair and salvage yard business still operates on the site. Business activities include the storage and dismantling of damaged vehicles and the sale of recovered auto parts.
Updated 10/2013

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Saco Municipal Landfill Green Infrastructure

The Saco Municipal Landfill Superfund site covers approximately 90 acres and has been owned and operated by the City of Saco, Maine, since 1960. The site covers four distinct disposal areas. Area 1 is a closed and capped municipal dump that was used for open burning of household and industrial waste. Area 2 is an inactive industrial dump that accepted bulk and demolition debris. Area 3 is a relatively small area in which wastes such as tires, leather and rubber scraps from local industries were dumped. Area 4 is a recently closed landfill that accepted household waste and tannery sludge. Chemicals and wastes have contaminated soil and ground water on the site. In 1990, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL). Under EPA and Maine Department of Environmental Protection (Maine DEP) oversight, the City of Saco cleaned up the site and, in 1998, the City of Saco began planning for the site’s reuse. EPA approved a plan to improve the wildlife habitat in the former gravel and sand pit in Landfill Area 4. In 2001, the City graded the area, established a vegetative cover, and constructed a series of wetland areas adjacent to Sandy Brook. In 2003, the city completed plans to develop a community recreation area for hiking, biking, ice skating and soccer. The City completed construction of two soccer fields for elementary and middle school children. The City is currently in the process of planning to utilize another portion of the site for additional town facilities.
Updated 8/2013

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