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Sites in Reuse in New Hampshire

Auburn Road Landfill
Site photo

The 200-acre Auburn Road Landfill site, located in Londonderry, New Hampshire, contains three separate disposal areas totaling approximately 12 acres. The site operated from the 1960s until 1980 as a disposal area for chemical wastes, tires, demolition debris and solid waste. The State of New Hampshire identified contamination in soil, ground water and surface water and ordered the landfill to close in 1980. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List in 1983. Cleanup activities included capping and fencing of contaminated areas, and extension of the municipal water supply to nearby residents. Ground water contamination is currently being addressed through monitored natural attenuation. Cleanup activities continue at the site but allow for recreational use of portions of the site for a model airplane flying field, which opened in 2008. Redevelopment resulted from collaboration between EPA, the New Hampshire Flying Tigers Academy of Model Aeronautics and the Town of Londonderry.
Updated 1/2013

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Fletcher's Paint Works & Storage

The 2-acre Fletcher’s Paint Works & Storage site in Milford, New Hampshire, was once a paint manufacturing plant and retail outlet. A nearby piece of property housed a large shed, primarily used as a pigment storage area. Fletcher's Paint Works’ on-site operations included the manufacturing and selling of latex and oil-based paints and stains from 1949 until 1991. The company stored several hundred drums of paint materials as well as bulk paint pigments on site, and naphtha and mineral spirits in underground tanks. In 1982, the New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services (NHDES) inspected the facility in response to a local complaint and found more than 800 drums of chemicals on the site, some leaking and open, and also found site-related contamination in the adjacent Keyes Municipal Water Supply Well. EPA listed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in March 1989 and began remediation efforts. Cleanup efforts included plant demolition, drum removals, placement of a permeable synthetic liner and gravel over areas containing high levels of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), fencing off the Elm Street property, installing an asphalt cover over a portion of the Mill Street storage site and removing contaminated soils from residential properties for off-site disposal. The potentially responsible party (PRP) has been performing quarterly ground water monitoring since late 2007 and will continue this monitoring until the approval of a long-term monitoring program. Remedial investigations continue at the site. In 1996, at the request from the Town of Milford, the PRP voluntarily removed soil with low levels of contamination, which opened space for the construction of a Korean War Memorial. Current site completion plans include the relocation of Mill Street onto the Mill Street storage area following excavation and backfill, and the construction of a multimedia cap at Elm Street consisting of both an engineered soil cover and an asphalted area. In 2012, a cap design modification resulted in covering an area of low level PCB-contamination with asphalt, specifically to provide the Town with additional parking for the nearby Keyes Recreational Field.
Updated 1/2013

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Ottati & Goss/Kingston Steel Drum Green Infrastructure

The 35-acre Ottati & Goss/Kingston Steel Drum Superfund site is located in Kingston, New Hampshire. The site consists of a 1-acre parcel, known as the Ottati & Goss area, and a 6-acre parcel, known as the Great Lakes Corporation area. From the late 1950s through 1976, various owners performed drum reconditioning operations on the Great Lakes Corporation area portion of the site. Runoff and seepage from the site into nearby surface water killed fish and aquatic vegetation. In addition, swimmers experienced skin irritation. From 1978 through 1979, site operators processed waste from the Great Lakes Corporation area facility at the Ottati & Goss area. After operations ceased in 1979, the New Hampshire Bureau of Solid Waste Management prohibited site operators from restarting operations and ordered them to remove thousands of deteriorating and leaking drums from the site. Activities at the site contaminated soil, ground water and surface water with volatile organic compounds and on-site soil with polychlorinated biphenyls, metals and acid and base or neutral compounds. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Cleanup activities included the removal of soil, drums and debris; excavation and treatment of soil and sediment; ground water treatment; and wetland restoration. Restoration of the Great Lakes Corporation area included the planting of more than 1,000 trees and shrubs.
Updated 10/2013

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Pease Air Force Base
Site photo

Cleanup and redevelopment have transformed the Pease Air Force Base site near Portsmouth, New Hampshire from one of the most contaminated Superfund sites in New England to a wildlife refuge and public airport. From the 1950s until 1991, the U.S. Air Force (Air Force) used the 4,000-acre facility to maintain military aircraft. Aircraft maintenance operations contaminated soil and ground water with solvents and fuel, prompting EPA to add the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1990. The Air Force has cleaned up the site and continues to treat and monitor ground water. In 1992, the Air Force transferred 1,702 acres of the site to the local government for use as a public airport and kept 229 acres for the New Hampshire Air National Guard. The New Hampshire Department of Transportation leased 20 acres for a highway expansion project. The Air Force also transferred 1,054 acres to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) for creation of the Great Bay National Wildlife Refuge. Then in 1997, USFWS received an additional 1,300 acres from the Air Force. Following the completion of cleanup activities in 2000, the Pease Development Association completed the Pease International Tradeport. The Pease International Tradeport currently includes about 250 businesses and provides employment to 7,000 people. In 2005, the Air Force transferred the remaining 268 acres of the site to the Pease Development Authority. Redevelopment of this area is ongoing.
Updated 1/2013

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South Municipal Water Supply Well Green Infrastructure

The 250-acre South Municipal Water Supply Well Superfund site is located in a rural portion of the Contoocook River Valley in Peterborough, New Hampshire. The site property consists of the 24-acre active New Hampshire Ball Bearings manufacturing facility, nearby commercial and residential properties, portions of the Contoocook River and U.S. Route 202, and adjacent wetlands and undeveloped parcels. Installed in 1952, the South Municipal Water Supply Well provided water to Peterborough for nearly 30 years. In 1982, the State of New Hampshire conducted a routine sampling of the water supply. The sampling found contaminants in the South Well and use of the well ceased in 1982. Located west of the well, the New Hampshire Ball Bearings facility is the source of the contamination. The facility has manufactured precision ball bearings at this upgradient location since 1956. Activities at the New Hampshire Ball Bearings facility contaminated soil, ground water and surface water near the facility with volatile organic compounds, and contaminated wetland sediments with volatile organic compounds and polychlorinated biphenyls. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1984. Initial cleanup activities at the site included ground water and soil treatment, excavation and off-site disposal of contaminated sediments as well as wetland restoration. Later, EPA determined that it was not possible to restore a portion of the contaminated ground water at the site and updated cleanup activities to contain the ground water instead of treat it. In 2008, EPA concluded that the site remedy was not functioning as intended. To address this, EPA changed the source control and migration management activities for the site in a 2010 Record of Decision Amendment. Cleanup activities, based on these changes, are underway.
Updated 10/2013

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Tinkham Garage
Site photo

Redevelopment of the 375-acre Tinkham Garage Superfund site in Londonderry, New Hampshire, has transformed the area from a contaminated waste disposal site to a thriving commercial and residential area. While in use as a garage during the late 1970s, operations discharged liquids and sludge from septic tank truck washings at the site. In 1983, EPA listed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL). Cleanup activities included construction of ground water and soil treatment systems, extension of the public water and sewer lines, and monitoring and sampling of ground water. During site cleanup activities, EPA provided information to interested parties to facilitate the safe reuse of the site. Today, stores and restaurants including a Home Depot, Staples, Dunkin’ Donuts and 99 Restaurant occupy the northeastern area of the site. The Woodland Village Condominium complex and several single family homes occupy the northern area of the site. The Nevins Retirement Cooperative Association has completed construction of over 125 residences on the central portion of the site as part of an active senior housing development. The site’s redevelopment has increased property values in Londonderry and increased economic activity at the site has spurred on infrastructure improvements.
Updated 1/2013

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Town Garage/Radio Beacon Green Infrastructure

The Town Garage/Radio Beacon Superfund site is located in Londonderry, New Hampshire. The site includes a series of residential wells and one commercial well, known as the Town Garage Well. The U.S. Department of Defense owned the Town Garage property from the early 1940s until 1968 and operated a radio beacon there during World War II. A 1994 state inspection found contamination in many of the site wells. Site investigations found that historic site operations contaminated ground water with volatile organic compounds (VOCs). In the late 1980s, owners of six residences affected by well contamination chose to hook up to the local public water supply. As a precaution, several other residences have since connected to the public water supply. EPA listed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989 and issued a cleanup plan for the site in a 1992 Record of Decision (ROD). Cleanup activities included monitored natural attenuation of ground water contaminants and institutional controls to prevent the use of ground water for household purposes. Annual ground water monitoring ensures public safety and the continued success of the remedy. The success of EPA’s cleanup plan allowed for the redevelopment of the site. Today, the site includes two residential developments and a wetland area. The Holton Circle development includes about 25 homes and the Saddlebrook development includes 20 new homes.
Updated 2/2014

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Troy Mills Landfill
Site photo

The Troy Mills Landfill Superfund site sits on a 270-acre parcel located in the rural town of Troy, New Hampshire. Troy Mills, Inc. used the property to dispose of solid waste and hazardous substances generated by its manufacturing facility in the center of town. Troy Mills, Inc. filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy in November 2001 and EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in September 2003. Cleanup actions included the installation of an interceptor system to collect free product from the ground water and the removal of 7,692 drums that generated 29,924 gallons of flammable liquid waste, 3,099 cubic yards of waste sludge and 26,244 tons of contaminated soil. EPA removed contaminated soil, backfilled excavated areas and covered areas with a soil cap. In 2005, EPA helped the local community identify appropriate reuses for the site. The community expressed interest in a passive recreation area that would include trails linking to the Cheshire County Rail Trail. A trail network on site, completed in 2004, forms part of the 42-mile Cheshire Branch Rail Trail system. The trail provides space for a variety of forms of recreations including hiking, horseback riding, snowmobiling, mountain biking and cross-country skiing. Limited access to the site for recreational use will continue until EPA completes site cleanup activities.
Updated 1/2013

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