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Sites in Reuse in New York

Applied Environmental Services Green Infrastructure

The 3.2-acre Applied Environmental Sciences Superfund site is located in Glenwood Landing, New York. Applied Environmental Services operated a chemical waste material blending facility and a hazardous waste storage facility on site, and recovered fuels from hazardous wastes at the site from 1980 to 1983. The facility included two one-story buildings, seven underground tanks and 11 aboveground tanks. Although workers removed the chemical tanks, spills, leaks and other activities contaminated site soil and ground water. The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) and site owner Shore Realty removed waste from on-site drums and tanks in 1985 and 1986. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in June 1986. Immediate cleanup actions included drum and tank removals, fencing installation and liquid waste collection. Long-term cleanup actions included the installation of ground water and soil treatment systems. The site’s potentially responsible parties (PRPs) began soil and ground water treatment efforts in June 1995; the systems continue to operate today. The site is now in ecological reuse. It is home to a restored salt marsh, coastal shoreline and new habitat that support diverse salt marsh and coastal plant and animal species, including marsh vegetation, invertebrates, fish and birds.
Updated 1/2013

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Bethlehem Steel Corp./Lackawanna Plant Alternative Energy
Site photo

In Lackawanna, New York, 14 2.5-megawatt utility-scale turbines generate enough electricity to serve the needs of about 9,000 western New York homes. A steel production plant operated at the Bethlehem Steel Corp/Lackawanna Plant site from the early 1900s until the mid-1980s. Contamination from the steel plant’s activities made the facility subject to an EPA Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) investigation in the 1990s. Twenty years later, two energy companies, BQ Energy and UPC Wind, expressed interest in the site as a potential location for a wind farm. In 2006, EPA declared portions of the site cleaned up and safe for reuse. The companies worked closely with the Lackawanna City Council to obtain local approvals and conducted studies to ensure that the site could support wind facilities. By early 2007, construction had begun on eight windmills on a 30-acre portion of site. Known as Steel Winds, the project won the Phoenix Award as the largest urban wind farm in the United States and the first located on a former Superfund and industrial Brownfields site. Building on the successful development of Steel Winds, the City of Lackawanna decided to move a rail line to the site and extend new roads to facilitate the redevelopment of the surrounding 400-acre former industrial area along Lake Erie. In 2012, Steel Winds expanded the project to include six new turbines, which produce up to 15 megawatts in addition to the 20 megawatts produced by the original eight turbines.
Updated 1/2013

Brewster Well Field

The 30-acre Brewster Well Field Superfund site is located near the banks of the East Branch Croton River in Putnam County, New York. From 1958 to 1983, Alben Dry Cleaners operated a commercial facility on site. Facility operators left dry-cleaning wastes in a drywell near the establishment. In 1978, testing revealed contamination in the Village of Brewster Well Field's water distribution system because of dry cleaning operations. From 1978 to 1984, the Village of Brewster tried various drilling and pumping methods to address the contamination. In 1984, the Village and EPA's Office of Research and Development installed a treatment system to remove the contamination in drinking water. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Cleanup crews removed and disposed of contaminated site sediments, sludge and soil in 1991. EPA had completed construction of a ground water management system by 1991. In 1996, EPA constructed an underground discharge pipe and outfall system for the system. In October 2007, the State became responsible for the system. The ground water management system still operates today. After a Subaru car dealership began operating on the site, sampling showed contaminated vapors could affect indoor air quality. This led to the installation of a subslab mitigation system. Sampling from 2011 indicated soil had reached cleanup goals. Restrictions on site property use and for site ground water remain. The site continues to be in commercial reuse and the car dealership employs 25 people.
Updated 10/2013

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Brookhaven National Laboratory (USDOE) Alternative Energy

The 5,265-acre Brookhaven National Laboratory Superfund site is located in the town of Upton on Long Island, New York. Originally a U.S. Army camp, the site became a facility for the Atomic Energy Commission in 1947. Currently, the U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) owns the site. Brookhaven Science Associates operates on site, developing nuclear, biomedical and environmental research projects. Former waste handling practices, as well as accidental spills and releases, resulted in site-wide contamination of ground water, soil and sediments. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List in November 1989. Currently, USDOE leads site cleanup activities under EPA oversight. Since discovery of site-wide contamination, USDOE has removed and properly disposed of contaminated soil, removed contaminated storage tanks, and covered on-site landfills containing hazardous materials. Additionally, USDOE provided affected residents with new drinking water sources. USDOE also installed a ground water pump and treat system. As a precaution, USDOE ended operation of a High Flux Beam Reactor that created hazardous materials at the site. In 2011, Long Island Solar Farm, LLC completed a wholesale solar energy project at the site. A 200-acre solar array at the site generates 32 megawatts of electricity.
Updated 6/2014

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Carroll & Dubies Sewage Disposal

The Carroll & Dubies Sewage Disposal Superfund site is located in the Neversink Valley in the Town of Deerpark, New York. The 3-acre site includes parcels of land owned by the cities of Port Jervis, Carroll and Dubies. The site initially consisted of seven waste disposal lagoons . Site operators disposed of septic and municipal sewage sludge, tires and cosmetic industrial wastes in the lagoons from 1970 to 1979. In June 1979, the New York Department of Environmental Conservation prohibited the disposal of industrial wastes at the site. Site operators continued to accept septic and municipal sewage waste until 1989. Site investigations in the early 1990s found that these disposal activities contaminated the lagoons, the surrounding soil and site ground water with volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and heavy metals. In response, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1990. EPA issued Records of Decision (RODs) selecting final cleanup plans for the source areas and the ground water in 1995 and 1996, respectively. Cleanup activities include natural attenuation of contaminants in the ground water, institutional controls to restrict the use and installation of ground water wells, ground water monitoring, surface water sampling, excavation and off-site treatment and disposal of lagoon sludge and soil, treatment of contaminated subsurface soils, and backfilling and regrading of excavated areas with clean soil. From April 1999 until 2000, the potentially responsible parties carried out the cleanup. The successful cleanup of the site enabled its beneficial reuse. In 2004, the City of Port Jervis began operating a small sand and gravel operation on part of the site. The Port Jervis Police Department also owns and operates a firing range on part of the site. Activities at the range do not conflict with the land use controls in place on the site.
Updated 10/2013

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Computer Circuits

The 1.7-acre Computer Circuits Superfund site is located in an industrial area of Hauppauge, New York. Computer Circuits began leasing the property from MCS Realty in 1969 and conducted a circuit board manufacturing operation on site until 1977. In the process of producing circuit boards for commercial and military clients, operators emptied waste liquids into several industrial cesspools on the perimeter of the building. Between 1976 and 1977, the Suffolk County Department of Environmental Control inspected the site and found it littered with trash, broken barrels and various chemicals. Computer Circuits excavated and backfilled the cesspools on the south side of the building in 1976 and 1977. Computer Circuits also vacated the building in 1977. In 1991, 145 Marcus Blvd., Inc. gained ownership of the building. Ground water monitoring revealed high levels of heavy metals (particularly copper) and volatile organic compounds in ground water underlying the site. This contamination posed a threat to human health, since all nearby residents obtained drinking water from the municipal wells. In response, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in May 1999. The current owner, 145 Marcus Blvd., Inc., is performing the cleanup with assistance from EPA. In 2005, the company installed a soil vapor extraction (SVE) system on the north side of the building. In 2008, remedial workers also installed an SVE system on the south side of the building. The SVE systems remove site-related volatile organic compounds from two different source areas and address the migration of these compounds. The current owners continue indoor air monitoring to ensure a safe environment inside the building. Castle Financial Advisors, LLC now leases the building as an office space.
Updated 10/2013

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Facet Enterprises, Inc.

The 31-acre Facet Enterprises, Inc. Superfund site is located in the Village of Elmira Heights, Chemung County, New York. Previous site operations included the manufacture of bicycle and car engine parts. The facility also produced small arms during World War II. From the 1940s through 1978, site activities included the on-site disposal of heavy metal sludge, spent solvents and oils. These activities resulted in the contamination of site soil, sediment and ground water with volatile organic compounds (VOCs), inorganics and petroleum. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. EPA’s cleanup plan for the site included the placement of all contaminated soil and sediment under a cap, ground water treatment and land use restrictions. Today, about half of the site property is developed. Purolator Products, Inc. Motor Components, LLC currently manufactures engine starter drives and electric fuel pumps on the site.
Updated 10/2013

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Forest Glen Mobile Home Subdivision
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During the 1970s, illegal dumping of chemical wastes occurred at the 39-acre Forest Glen Mobile Home Subdivision Superfund site in Niagara Falls, New York. Site operators inadequately covered an 11-acre area of the site used for dumping with topsoil. From the mid-1970s to 1980s, a mobile home park occupied this area. In 1987, an EPA site assessment found soil and ground water contamination at the site. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989. In 1990, permanent relocation of the 53 families who resided in the subdivision began. Cleanup activities included placement of a fence around the site to prevent access, excavation of contaminated soil, consolidation of contaminated soil in the former subdivision area and placement of a cap over the area. The site’s extraction system removes contaminated ground water from the site and then the Niagara Falls Waste Water Treatment Plant treats the water. The land use at the site changed in 1999 from residential to commercial and industrial. In 2003, redevelopment of the site took place with the construction of a 40,000 square foot commercial building over the cap. Today, the building operates as a distribution facility, employing three people full-time.
Updated 1/2013

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Goldisc Recordings, Inc.

The 34-acre Goldisc Recordings, Inc. Superfund site is located in an industrial section of Long Island, New York. The site includes two one-story buildings on six acres with three acres of pavement. Between 1968 and 1983, two major companies operated at the site. Viewlex Audio Visual, Inc. manufactured audio visual and optical devices in one building. Goldisc Recordings, Inc. manufactured phonograph records in the second building. Wastes generated at the site included large amounts of nickel-plating wastes stored in aboveground storage tanks, hydraulic oil and smaller amounts of solvents. On several occasions, the Suffolk County Department of Health Services (SCDHS) discovered chemical wastes in storm drains, holding ponds and dry wells. Site leaks and spills contaminated site soil and ground water with nickel, copper, iron, cadmium, zinc, lead and chromium. In 1986, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL). EPA documented a cleanup plan to address contaminated soil and ground water in two Records of Decision (RODs) dated 1995 and 1998. Cleanup activities included the removal and off-site disposal of contaminated soil and sediment. In addition, EPA performed routine ground water monitoring as part of a monitored natural attenuation program to address contaminated ground water. EPA documented the completion of cleanup activities in a 1998 preliminary close-out report. The successful cleanup of the site allowed for the redevelopment of the site with numerous commercial businesses. Consumers Kitchens and Baths operates out of the former Goldisc Recordings, Inc. building. Other site businesses include a ceramic tile company, a carton facility, a distribution center and assorted dry-goods operations. The Federal Express distribution center operates on part of the previously undeveloped site property. EPA continues to monitor the site ground water. EPA has issued three five-year review reports for the site.
Updated 10/2013

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Gowanus Canal
Site photo

The Gowanus Canal, a 100-foot wide, 1.8-mile long canal located in the New York City borough of Brooklyn, Kings County, New York, borders several residential neighborhoods. Waterfront property next to the canal primarily consists of commercial and industrial uses, including concrete manufacturing plants, warehouses and parking lots. Since the 1860s, the Gowanus Canal has allowed industrial boat access through a tidal creek and wetland previously used for oyster fishing. The canal quickly turned into one of the nation’s busiest industrial waterways, home to heavy industry, including manufactured gas plants, coal yards, cement makers, soap makers, tanneries, paint and ink factories, machine shops, chemical plants and oil refineries. Operators of industrial facilities along the shore disposed of untreated industrial wastes in the canal. Raw sewage and surface water runoff deposited additional wastes in the canal for decades. The city built a "Flushing Tunnel" in 1911 to replace the stagnant water in the canal with fresh, oxygen-rich water that would improve water quality. The tunnel worked until the 1960s, when mechanical failure caused it to shut down. The city subsequently restored the Flushing Tunnel, which operated 24 hours a day, seven days a week, bringing fresh water into the canal. Tunnel operators shut down the Flushing Tunnel for repairs in 2010 and anticipate the tunnel will be functioning again by 2013. Although much of the industrial activity along the canal has stopped, high contaminant levels remain in canal sediments. The New York-New Jersey Estuary, which EPA has designated an Estuary of National Significance, includes the canal. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in March 2010. Investigations and cleanup activities continue at the site. During these efforts, a post-industrial waterfront tour at the Gowanus Canal site teaches participants about the history of the canal and surrounding area, including everything from historic landmarks to houseboats. Local residents also use the canal for recreational purposes, such as canoeing and kayaking.
Updated 1/2013

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Haviland Complex

The 275-acre Haviland Complex Superfund site is located in the Village of Hyde Park, New York. The site includes an apartment complex, schools, a shopping center and a number of private homes. In 1982, the New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH) discovered that septic system wastes from the area had contaminated ground water with volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Local investigations identified the Haviland Laundromat and Dry Cleaner and the Haviland Car Wash as the contamination source. In 1983, NYSDOH ordered the laundromat to disconnect its dry cleaning unit from the septic system and properly dispose of all wastes. The state notified all residents in the area of the situation and advised the use of bottled water. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1986. Cleanup activities included the use of whole-house water treatment systems and monitoring of the affected homes. Additional cleanup activities included the monitoring of natural processes to clean up contaminated ground water. In the summer of 2000, the county extended the public water system to the site area, connecting all affected residents. In April 2008, EPA transferred the site to the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC). After 10 years of site monitoring, observations showed that contaminant levels had decreased to quantities close to cleanup goals. Actions taken by EPA and state and local agencies allowed the continued operation of the schools and businesses located on the site. In addition, residents were able to stay in their homes throughout cleanup activities.
Updated 10/2013

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Hiteman Leather
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Redevelopment Pilot grant in 2001 to support the development of a Reuse Assessment Plan for the site. The EPA worked to incorporate considerations put forth in the Reuse Assessment Plan into their cleanup actions. The Village hopes to redevelop the site in phases. Currently, the Village is constructing a much-needed sewer treatment system on part of the site to serve the downtown area. In addition to the new on-site biking and hiking trails, the Village also plans to redevelop the site to house Village offices, a library, a police station, a senior citizens’ facility, soccer fields, a fitness area and a swimming pool. The EPA deleted the site from the NPL in 2012, and site stakeholders expect the deletion to encourage additional redevelopment activities. After the Village voiced its interest in reuse, EPA awarded West Winfield a Superfund Redevelopment Pilot grant in 2001 to support the development of a Reuse Assessment Plan for the site. EPA worked to incorporate considerations put forth in the Reuse Assessment Plan into their cleanup actions. The Village hopes to redevelop the site in phases. Currently, the Village is constructing a much-needed sewer treatment system on part of the site to serve the downtown area. In addition to the new on-site biking and hiking trails, the Village plans to redevelop the site to house Village offices, a library, a police station, a senior citizens’ facility, soccer fields, a fitness area and a swimming pool. EPA deleted the site from the NPL in 2012, and site stakeholders expect the deletion to encourage additional redevelopment activities.
Updated 6/2013

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Hopewell Precision

The Hopewell Precision Superfund site is located in the East Fishkill, New York. Since the early 1970s, Hopewell Precision, Inc. has manufactured sheet metal parts and assemblies on site. Manufacturing processes included painting, degreasing and disposing of related wastes directly on the ground. In 2003, EPA investigations determined that these activities resulted in the contamination of ground water with volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Initial cleanup activities included the installation of in-home water treatment units and ventilation systems for affected residents. The ventilation systems addressed vapor intrusion caused by the contaminated ground water. In 2005, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL). Additional cleanup plans include using the monitoring of natural processes to cleanup ground water contamination. The cleanup plan also calls for an alternate water supply for affected homes. These cleanup activities are still in the planning phase. EPA’s initial cleanup activities allowed for the continued use of the property throughout the cleanup process. Today, Hopewell Precision, Inc. continues to operate a custom sheet metal and machining fabrication company on site.
Updated 10/2013

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Jones Sanitation Green Infrastructure

Located in a rural part of Dutchess County, New York, the 57-acre Jones Sanitation Superfund site includes wetland and wooded areas. The property owner disposed of septic and industrial wastes on site from 1956 to 1979. Materials disposed of in the landfill included oils and greases, acids, alkalis, solvents, metals from plating operations, pigments, phenols and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). These disposal activities contaminated ground water and soil with heavy metals such as chromium, copper, lead, cadmium and mercury, as well as oils, grease and VOCs. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1987 and took over the management of the site response and investigations from the state in 1990. EPA documented a cleanup plan for the site in a 1997 Record of Decision (ROD). Cleanup activities included the excavation and onsite consolidation of contaminated soils, construction of a cap over the consolidated soil and monitoring of site ground water. Institutional controls for the site prevent development on the cap and the use of ground water without prior EPA approval. EPA completed the site cleanup in September 2001 and deleted the site from the NPL in 2005. The successful cleanup of the site allowed for the beneficial reuse of the property. Today, a cleared portion of the Site serves as a parking and truck storage area. The cleanup also enabled the ecological use of the wetlands and wooded areas of the site.
Updated 10/2013

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Kenmark Textile Corporation
Site location map

The 5-acre Kenmark Textile Corp. Superfund site in East Farmingdale, New York has been home to several textile dying, printing and screening businesses since the early 1900s. Site operators, including the Kenmark Textile Corporation, and later the Susquehanna Textile Corporation, chemically treated wastewater generated in the production processes and discharged it to outdoor concrete-lined lagoons on site. The contaminated wastewater settled and evaporated before the operators placed residue in drums for off-site disposal. In 1979, the state issued a permit requiring Kenmark to treat its wastes properly, and discharge them into the municipal sewer system. In 1981, the Suffolk County Department of Health temporarily closed the company for illegally storing drums of hazardous waste. In 1986, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL). Cleanup efforts including removing more than 50 drums containing hazardous waste and other visibly-contaminated materials from the site to ensure the safety of the public and the surrounding environment. In March 1994, EPA determined that no further action was necessary at the site. EPA deleted the site from the NPL on May 30, 1995, as it does not pose a threat to human health or the environment. A private home furnishings company, a general merchandise store, a full-service beverage company, a truck leasing company and a window and door installation company are now located and operating at the site.
Updated 1/2013

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Liberty Industrial Finishing
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The 30-acre Liberty Industrial Finishing Superfund site is located in Oyster Bay, New York. Beginning in the early 1930s, an aircraft parts manufacturer and a metal-finishing facility operated on the site. From 1940 to 1944, facilities at the site converted to manufacture products for World War II. After the war, aircraft parts manufacturing continued through 1957. At that time, the facility began to operate as an industrial park; metal plating and finishing and fiberglass products manufacturing took place on site. From the 1980s until 2009, the site hosted light manufacturing facilities and warehouses. Industrial activities on site contaminated soil, sediment and ground water. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in June 1986. Cleanup has included removal of underground storage tanks and contaminated soil and sediment and putting ground water treatment systems in place. Parties completed the construction of the remedy in September 2012. Ground water treatment systems continue to operate. In July 2001, the Town of Oyster Bay sought to use the western portion of the site to expand the neighboring 16-acre Ellsworth Allen community park. In October 2002, EPA entered into an agreement with the Town. It ensured the protectiveness of the site’s remedy and allowed the site’s reuse to move forward. In return for EPA waiving any potential Superfund liability for the local government and releasing Superfund liens on the site property, the Town made a substantial payment to EPA. The resources were to help fund cleanup activities and reimburse the Agency for its costs at the site. In September 2003, the Town acquired the site’s western parcel using its eminent domain authority. In July 2010, the Town took ownership of the 7.5-acre central parcel for the park expansion. Following EPA’s site cleanup and additional soil cleanup by the Town in 2010 and 2011 to meet state standards for residential reuse, the Town held community planning meetings for the Ellsworth Allen Park expansion. Preliminary plans for the park include a community center, ballfields, a multi-purpose sports field and green space. Site stakeholders also redeveloped the eastern portion of the site in 2010, locating a supermarket and parking lot on site.
Updated 1/2013

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Love Canal
Site location map

The Love Canal Superfund site, located less than one mile from the Niagara River in Niagara Falls, New York, consists of a 70-acre site that includes a former 16-acre industrial landfill. In the 1890s, William Love excavated the canal for a hydroelectric project. Since William Love never implemented the project, Hooker Chemicals and Plastics (now Occidental Chemical Corporation) bought the canal in 1942. Over a 10-year period, Hooker Chemicals and Plastics disposed of 21,000 tons of hazardous waste, including halogenated organics, pesticides, chlorobenzenes and dioxins on the site. By 1953, Hooker Chemicals and Plastics covered the landfill and sold the site to the Niagara Falls Board of Education. Beginning in the 1970s, local residents noticed foul odors and chemical residues and experienced increased rates of cancer and other severe health problems. In 1978 and 1980, President Carter declared two States of Emergency for the site, and evacuated more than 900 families from their homes. The severity of the site’s contamination led to federal legislation dealing with hazardous waste, including the passage of the Superfund law in 1980. EPA listed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1980 and began to work with New York State to clean up the site and contain the contamination. EPA and New York State completed remedial construction in 1999, and EPA deleted the site from the NPL in 2004. Today, Love Canal includes more than 260 rehabilitated homes and 10 apartment complexes as part of a senior citizen complex. Commercial and industrial redevelopment continues near the site.
Updated 1/2013

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Marathon Battery Corporation Green Infrastructure
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The 70-acre Marathon Battery Corp. Superfund site is located in Cold Spring, New York. In 1965, the State of New York began requiring all towns and industries located along the Hudson River to treat their sanitary and industrial wastes before discharging them into the river. The Marathon Battery facility, which produced batteries for military and industrial use, had previously released untreated industrial waste into the Hudson River and nearby marshes for 13 years. The plant’s owners complied and performed a limited cleanup of the contamination in the 1970s. However, later studies revealed that high levels of metals remained in river sediments and surrounding wetlands. In 1983, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL). While the majority of contamination was in the marshes, heavy metal dusts were also inside and outside the plant, and in the yards of nearby homes. The potentially responsible parties (PRPs) demolished the battery plant and removed contaminated soils from the site and surrounding neighborhood yards. PRPs also removed contaminated sediments from the marshes. Following cleanup, EPA deleted the site from the NPL in 1996. The following year, the Scenic Hudson Land Trust purchased an 85-acre parcel of land along the Hudson, which included a portion of this former Superfund site. EPA and the Trust entered into a Prospective Purchaser Agreement that enabled the Trust to redevelop the site without liability for any previous site contamination. The Trust added hiking trails for public use and renovated the site to highlight points of interest reflecting its Civil War industrial history. Now safe for public use and natural habitat, the site’s transformation benefits local residents and wildlife alike.
Updated 9/2014

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Mercury Refining, Inc.
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The half-acre Mercury Refining, Inc. Superfund site is located in Guilderland and Colonie, New York. From 1956 to 1998, site operations included mercury reclamation from batteries and other mercury-bearing materials. Until 1980, site activities included the dumping of waste batteries and other mercury-containing wastes behind an on-site furnace building. These disposal practices resulted in the contamination of soil, sediment and ground water with mercury and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Initial cleanup activities, performed by the potentially responsible parties (PRPs), included digging up and disposing of contaminated soil. In 2008, EPA selected a final cleanup plan to address remaining site contamination. The plan calls for the removal of contaminated sediment and surface soil and the on-site treatment of ground water and deep contaminated soils through in-situ solidification and stabilization. Final cleanup activities are underway. The PRPs and EPA have worked together throughout the cleanup process to allow the continued on-site operation of Mercury Refining, Inc. Today, Mercury Refining, Inc. uses an on-site building as an office and to process materials containing precious metals.
Updated 10/2013

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Mohonk Road Industrial Plant

The 15-acre Mohonk Road Industrial Plant (MRIP) Superfund site is located in High Falls, New York. Since the 1960s, site operators conducted industrial activities on site including metal finishing, wet spray painting and store fixture manufacturing. These processes each required different types of solvents. A resident voiced concern about the water quality in 1994. Consequent sampling revealed contaminants affected water in at least 70 homes near the site. In response, the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) provided water filtration units to the affected residents and businesses. In the mid-1990s, NYSDEC identified a 1,000-gallon septic tank on the site property as a potential source of contamination. The NYSEDC removed the tank in 1997. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1999 and documented a cleanup plan for ground water and soil in 2000. Cleanup activities included the removal and off-site disposal of about 2,500 tons of contaminated soil and waste. Ground water cleanup actions included the construction and operation of a ground water removal and treatment plant. In fall 2005, EPA began construction of a new public water supply system (PWS) within the High Falls Water District (HFWD). Completed in 2007, the system provides potable water to the residences or businesses impacted by site ground water contamination. In September 2008, EPA updated the ground water treatment plan to address the plume located furthest from the site. In September 2011, EPA transferred most of the site operations to New York State. EPA continues to monitor site ground water. Kithkin Corp. purchased part of the site in 1993 and now leases the building to several commercial businesses, including a small woodworking company. EPA’s cleanup plan allowed the on-site businesses to continue operating throughout cleanup activities.
Updated 10/2013

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Newtown Creek

Newtown Creek is a 3.8-mile-long tidal water body in New York City. The creek is a tributary of the East River and has five principal tributaries. In the mid-1800s, the area adjacent to the mostly stagnant creek was a busy industrial hub. The area included oil refineries, petrochemical plants, fertilizer and glue factories, sawmills, and lumber and coal yards. The transportation, handling and dumping of oils, chemicals and metals contributed to the creek’s contamination. In addition to the industrial pollution, the city began dumping raw sewage into the creek in 1856. Agencies including the New York City Department of Environmental Protection and EPA have collected contaminated surface water and sediment samples at the site since 1980. Local facilities have also conducted investigations and cleanup under state and federal programs to stop hazardous discharges into the creek. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in September 2010. EPA identified at least six parties as potentially responsible for contamination in the creek and expects to identify more as studies progress. Remedial investigations and fieldwork are ongoing at the site. Many factories and facilities still operate along the creek and the local community occasionally uses it for recreational purposes such as fishing and kayaking.
Updated 1/2013

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Niagara Mohawk Power Corp. (Saratoga Springs Plant)

EPA worked closely with the community of Saratoga Springs, New York, and the site owner at the Niagara Mohawk Power Corp. (Saratoga Springs Plant) Superfund site to protect human health and the environment and to incorporate community priorities, including preservation of historic community resources and recreational reuse, into site cleanup plans. As part of the cleanup of this former coal gas manufacturing facility, the site owner preserved and relocated the site’s historic brick roundhouse, originally slated for demolition. Over a century old, the 70-foot-diameter structure is one of only a handful of these buildings left in the United States. EPA also adjusted restoration plans for areas next to Spring Run Creek to facilitate local efforts to construct a recreational trail. Today, pedestrians and bicyclists enjoy the 1.2-mile Spring Run Trail, completed in 2010. The path, which follows an old railroad bed along the fault line of historic natural springs, connects the city’s downtown with nearby recreation areas and shopping centers.
Updated 1/2013

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North Sea Municipal Landfill
Site photo

The 131-acre North Sea Landfill Superfund site is an inactive municipal landfill owned and operated by the Town of Southampton, New York. The landfill accepted trash, construction debris, and septic system waste from 1963 to 1995. The site consists of four areas: Cell No. 1, Cell No. 2, Cell No. 3 and former septic sludge or scavenger lagoons. The Town of Southampton started a ground water monitoring program in 1979. Site monitoring found that disposal activities resulted in the contamination of ground water, surface water and soil with heavy metals. Monitoring also found evidence of leachate from the landfill, including ammonia and high levels of nitrate/nitrite. Initial response actions at the site included providing emergency water to affected homes until their connection to the public water supply in 1981 and the decommissioning of the sludge lagoons in 1986. In 1986, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL). EPA documented the cleanup plan for remaining contamination at the site in two Records of Decision (RODs) dated 1989 and 1992. Cleanup activities included closure of Cell No. 1 by constructing a landfill cap and perimeter gas venting system. EPA determined that ground water required no action because contaminant levels were within EPA's acceptable risk range. All cells are now permanently closed and Cells No. 2 and No. 3 are no longer part of the site. The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation regulates those cells under its municipal waste landfill closure program. EPA deleted the site from the NPL in 2005. The successful cleanup of the site allowed for beneficial reuse of the property, providing valuable public resources and services to the local community. The Town of Southampton built a recreation center within the landfill property and uses a portion of the site as a community recycling center.
Updated 10/2013

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Old Bethpage Landfill Alternative Energy
Site location map

The Town of Oyster Bay, New York, disposed of municipal and industrial waste at the 68-acre Old Bethpage Landfill from 1957 to 1986. In 1979, local and federal officials identified contaminated waste at the landfill that posed a risk to the local drinking water supply. In 1983, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL). In 1988, the town began to clean up the site, with oversight provided by the State of New York. The town installed a system to capture, store and treat liquids leaking from the landfill, built a cap over the site, and revegetated the area. When the landfill began to produce a greater volume of methane, the town installed a methane gas collection system, operating a methane co-generation facility at the site and selling the electricity generated by burning the methane. The methane co-generation facility closed in 2002, when methane production began to decline.
Updated 1/2013

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Old Roosevelt Field Contaminated GW Area
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The Old Roosevelt Field Contaminated Ground Water Area (ORCA) Superfund site is located in the Village of Garden City, New York. Between 1911 and 1951, the site supported private and military aviation activities. Site operations included the use of chlorinated solvents for aircraft manufacturing, maintenance and repair operations during and after World War II. Site activities resulted in the contamination of public supply wells and ground water with volatile organic compounds (VOCs). EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 2000. Cleanup activities included the installation of a ground water extraction and treatment system. The site received $10 million of American Resource and Recovery Act (ARRA) funding in 2009. EPA used the money to help fund the ground water cleanup. Construction of the treatment system began in March 2011 and ended in December 2011. The successful cleanup of the site allowed for the beneficial reuse of the property. Once a contaminated airfield, the site now serves as home to the Roosevelt Field Shopping Mall and Garden City Plaza.
Updated 10/2013

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Onondaga Lake Green Infrastructure

The Onondaga Lake Superfund site includes Onondaga Lake (the Lake), several major and minor tributaries, and upland sources of contamination in Syracuse, New York. Former industrial processing plants and municipal wastewater treatment plants regularly discharged their wastes into the Lake in the past. Honeywell International, Inc., is the successor to two former on-site companies. These include the Solvay Process Company and AlliedSignal, Inc. The Solvay Process Company produced soda ash and several large waste beds along the western shoreline of the Lake. AlliedSignal discharged mercury and other heavy metals into the Lake. Honeywell’s Semet Residue Ponds also contributed to site contamination. EPA added the site to the Superfund program’s National Priorities List (NPL) in 1994. Cleanup activities have included demolishing buildings, excavating and treating contaminated soil and sediment, and capping containment areas. Additional activities included containing and treating ground water, and reestablishing site vegetation and wetlands. Cleanup activities continue, but the community has already seen a change in the lake area. The local government banned public fishing at the Lake as early as 1970, but re-opened the Lake to allow catch-and-release fishing in 1986. During the summer of 2012, about 150 community members participated in a fishing derby at the Lake. Sixty species of fish now live in the Lake, where only 12 species had lived in the heavy pollution years ago. The State of New York and Onondaga County recently proposed construction of a new outdoor amphitheater that will become the central focus of lakefront revitalization efforts in Syracuse. Amphitheatre construction could reach completion as early as late 2015, in time for a 2016 concert series. Additional revitalization plans include making streetscape improvements and connecting recreational trails around the Lake. Currently, a bicycling and walking trail runs through a portion of the Site.
Updated 5/2014

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Pasley Solvents & Chemicals, Inc.
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The Pasley Solvents & Chemicals, Inc. Superfund site is located in Hempstead, New York. The 75-foot by 275-foot site is a former tank farm previously used for the storage of oils, solvents and chemicals. Site operations included chemical delivery, transfer and storage. Poor waste handling and storage practices resulted in the contamination of on- and off-site soil and ground water with volatile and semi-volatile compounds. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1986 and selected a cleanup plan for the site in a 1992 Record of Decision (ROD). Cleanup activities included the treatment of contaminated soil by soil vapor extraction and treatment of the ground water plume by ground water extraction and treatment. A ROD amendment signed in May 1995 replaced the ground water extraction and treatment with air sparging to clean up the ground water at the site. Construction of the remedy started on June 26, 1997 and ended on October 21, 1997. Monitoring results verified the success of the soil and ground water cleanup. In 2011, EPA documented the completion of site cleanup in a close-out report and deleted the site from the NPL. The successful cleanup enabled the redevelopment of the site. Plato Holding LLC bought the property in August 2003 and negotiated with the Metropolitan Transit Authority (MTA) to use the site as a police station. The MTA paved a portion of the site and installed an office trailer. Plato Holding LLC sold the property to Yonah Reality in March 2007. Yonah Reality intends to continue to use the property as a police station.
Updated 10/2013

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Preferred Plating Corp.
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The ¾-acre Preferred Plating Corporation Superfund site is located in Farmingdale, New York. Metal plating operations occurred on site from 1951 until 1976, when the business filed for bankruptcy. Plating processes included the degreasing, cleaning and surface finishing of metal parts. These processes involved the use of various chemicals and resulted in the generation, storage and disposal of hazardous waste. The rinsing of metal parts in between each process generated wastewater. The company discharged this untreated wastewater to four concrete pits directly behind the original building. These activities resulted in the contamination of soil and ground water with heavy metals and chlorinated organic compounds. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1986. In April and May 1994, remedial workers removed contaminated soil off site for treatment or disposal. The contaminated soil was the source of the ground water contamination. Between June 1994 and June 1996, ground water sampling reflected a significant decrease in ground water contamination levels as a result of the soil removal. Ongoing ground water monitoring demonstrates that the remedy remains protective. The successful cleanup of the site allowed for the beneficial reuse of the property. Today, the site is home to multiple businesses, including an automobile repair shop.
Updated 10/2013

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Rosen Brothers Scrap Yard
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Thanks to a unique agreement among EPA, the City of Cortland (the City), the State of New York, and the New York, Susquehanna and Western Railroad, the abandoned Rosen Brothers Scrap Yard/Dump Superfund site will soon house an intermodal transfer facility, generating jobs and revenue for the community. Previous site owners dumped hazardous wastes on the property and drums of unknown chemicals littered the 20-acre site. For years, the City cited the owners for violating state and county waste-disposal laws. After discovering contamination in both soil and ground water on site, the City requested EPA's assistance. In 1989, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL). EPA immediately removed the drums, hazardous debris and contaminated soil, and helped secure the site. Ultimately, EPA worked with local parties to recycle over 700 tons of abandoned scrap metal from the site and completed the construction of a cover over the entire 20-acre site. During the cleanup, the City developed plans to reuse a portion of the site as an intermodal rail-to-road transport facility. EPA worked closely with the City to negotiate a Prospective Purchaser Agreement and take title to the property. The agreement ensured that the City would not have responsibility for previous contamination at the site and required that redevelopment construction not damage the cover over the site.
Updated 1/2013

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Rowe Industries Ground Water Contamination
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The 8-acre Rowe Industries Ground Water Contamination Superfund site is located in the Village of Sag Harbor, New York. Since the 1950s, different companies have used the site to manufacture electronic devices and transformers. Site activities included the storage of solvents in a wooded area behind the facility. The Suffolk County Department of Health Services (SCDHS) first discovered ground water contamination in 1983 after sampling a private well near the site. The agency’s investigation found that site activities resulted in the contamination of ground water and soil with volatile organic contaminants (VOCs). In 1985, initial response actions included the connection of affected homes to the public water supply. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1987. Cleanup activities included digging up and treating contaminated soil before disposing of the soil off site. Cleanup efforts also include the ongoing treatment of the VOC-contaminated ground water. EPA’s cleanup plan allowed the continued use of the site throughout cleanup activities. A manufacturer of electronic devices (Sag Harbor Industries), an ice company, a landscaping company and an awning manufacturer currently occupy the building on the property.
Updated 10/2013

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SMS Instruments, Inc.

The SMS Instruments, Inc. Superfund site is located in a light industrial area in Deer Park, New York. The site consists of a 34,000-square-foot building on a 1.5-acre lot. Buildings or asphalt cover about 90 percent of the site. From 1971 to 1983, SMS Instruments, Inc. maintained military aircraft components and dumped wastewater into a leaching pool. The firm also stored jet fuel in an underground tank and stored corroded and leaking drums in an unprotected outdoor area. These improper handling and disposal practices contaminated ground water and soil. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1986. To clean up the site, EPA pumped, filled and sealed the leaching pond; cleaned up contaminated soil and treated ground water. Following EPA’s deletion of the site from the NPL in September 2010, light industrial uses resumed. Currently, Datacomm Cables Inc., a retail merchant of electronic cables and accessories, operates on site.
Updated 9/2014

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Syosset Landfill

The Syosset Landfill Superfund site occupies about 38 acres in the Town of Oyster Bay, New York. The landfill operated from 1933 until 1975, accepting commercial, industrial, residential, demolition, agricultural, sludge wastes and ash wastes. A site inspection in 1982 found that former landfill practices had contaminated site soil and ground water and had created the potential for exposure to landfill gas. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Cleanup activities included installing a permanent ventilation trench to prevent potential gas vapor migration from the landfill to neighboring residences and an elementary school, as well as a cap to contain over 6.7 million tons of waste buried at the site. Following completion of cleanup activities and EPA’s determination that the site does not pose a risk to human health, the Agency deleted the site from the NPL in 2005. The Town of Oyster Bay has returned the site to productive use. The site houses a salt storage facility, a miscellaneous equipment storage facility, a vehicle parking facility and a sanitation vehicle facility for the town’s highway division. In 2009, the town received American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funds through the U.S. Department of Energy Clean Cities Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicles Pilot Program to build a compressed natural gas (CNG) fueling facility station at the site and to convert 44 sanitation trucks from diesel fuel to CNG. The town completed a CNG fueling facility in 2011. EPA estimates that the converted, clean-burning CNG trucks will reduce the town’s petroleum usage by 264,000 gallons per year and produce fewer greenhouse emissions.
Updated 1/2013

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Tronic Plating Company, Inc.
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The half-acre Tronic Plating Co., Inc. Superfund is located in Farmingdale, New York. From 1968 to 1984, the Tronic Plating Company operated at the site within a portion of an industrial park in the area. The company provided electroplating and metal protective coating services for the electronics industry. During operation, the facility discharged industrial wastes containing copper, silver, iron, zinc, lead and cadmium into a storm sewer and four underground leaching pools. Discharges of wastes contaminated ground water, soil and sediment with volatile organic compounds and metals. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1986. Following the removal of contaminated soil and sediment and completion of site cleanup activities, EPA deleted the site from the NPL in 2001. Today, the site has returned to productive reuse. Three small businesses operate from the portion of the industrial park formerly occupied by Tronic Plating Company.
Updated 1/2013

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Wide Beach Development
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When temperatures climb and Lake Erie begins to thaw, residents of the Wide Beach Development in Brant, New York, prepare for the annual migration of summer vacationers to this scenic resort town. Vacationers and homeowners alike come to this area for the beauty and relaxation that Lake Erie has to offer. Between 1968 and 1978, the Wide Beach Development Homeowners Association sprayed thousands of gallons of waste oil onto area dirt roads to control dust. Unbeknownst to members of the Homeowners Association, some of the waste oil contained polychlorinated biphenyls, a suspected carcinogen. In 1983, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL). EPA worked closely with the state and the homeowners to remove contaminated soil from both roads and yards, while allowing continued use of the homes. Following the completion of cleanup activities, EPA deleted the 55-acre Wide Beach Development Superfund site from the NPL in 1994.
Updated 1/2013

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