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Sites in Reuse in Maryland

Chemical Metals Industries

The Chemical Metals Industries (CMI) site in Baltimore, Maryland includes two separate properties. At one of the properties, CMI operated a chemical manufacturing facility and recovered precious metals. CMI used the other property, an inactive gas station, for storage of waste and scrap metal. Leaking drums on both properties prompted inspections of the site. These investigations revealed extensive contamination and the potential for fire or explosion. In 1981, EPA proposed the site to the National Priorities List (NPL). EPA, supported by the Maryland Department of Environmental Protection (MDEP), removed the contaminated drums, debris and liquid waste from the site, and constructed a protective cap to prevent further contamination. Following cleanup activities, EPA deleted the site from the NPL in 1982. In 1998, EPA conducted additional investigations and found the cap deteriorating and cracking. EPA, in consultation with MDEP, removed contaminated soil beneath the cap. The former inactive gas station property remains vacant. MDEP currently uses the chemical manufacturing facility property as an emergency response field office.
Updated 2/2013

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Kane & Lombard Street Drums
Site photo

The 10-acre Kane & Lombard Street Drums site is located at the corner of Kane and Lombard streets in Baltimore, Maryland. For more than 22 years, an open dump for disposing of demolition, municipal, and industrial wastes operated at the site. Disposal activities resulted in the contamination of ground water and soil at the site. At the request of the Maryland Department of the Environment (MDE), EPA investigated the site. In 1986, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL). EPA worked closely with the local community, MDE, and a private investment group to design and implement a cleanup that allowed for the redevelopment of the property. As part of the site remedy, EPA removed over 1,200 drums of waste, installed a subsurface barrier to prevent further contamination of ground water and constructed a permanent cap over contaminated soil. EPA also implemented institutional controls at the site to restrict land and ground water use to prevent exposure to contaminated soil and ground water. Today, the property is home to a golf course driving range, a parking lot, a cellular telephone tower, a sea-land trailer repair facility and a trucking facility.
Updated 2/2013

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Mid-Atlantic Wood Preservers
Site photo

The 3-acre Mid-Atlantic Wood Preservers, Inc. Superfund site is located in Harmans, Maryland. The site operated as a wood treatment facility from 1974 through 1993. Site operators used chromated copper arsenate to treat wood on site. In 1978, site investigations found soil and ground water contaminated with chromium and arsenic from wood treating operations at the site. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1986. In 1993, the site’s potentially responsible party (PRP) conducted cleanup activities under EPA oversight. Cleanup activities included excavating contaminated soil from a neighboring property and covering the entire three-acre facility with an asphalt cap. In 1994, EPA entered into a Prospective Purchaser Agreement with Gunther’s Leasing & Transport, a neighboring property owner. Gunther’s expanded its operations and uses the site as a truck maintenance garage and a filling station. LMS, Inc. leases the former treatment building on site and operates a recreational boat repair shop. Several other firms lease portions of the buildings on site and operate an indoor soccer facility as well as trucking service and parking area for a limousine business. EPA deleted the site from the NPL in 2000.
Updated 2/2013

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Middletown Road Dump

The Middletown Road Dump Superfund site includes 15 acres of privately owned land located off Route 50 in Annapolis, Maryland. The site accepted rubble, construction debris, and municipal and industrial waste for several decades without proper state permits. A site inspection in 1981 shut down the dump after it discovered 40 crushed and deteriorating drums as well as four dumpster loads of debris contaminated with hazardous substances, such as paint sludge and solvents. Investigations identified heavy metal contamination in soil at the site, which threatened ground water and nearby surface water. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Cleanup activities included the removal and off-site disposal of 68 drums, 70 contaminated tires, 610 tons of contaminated soil and numerous 5-gallon pails of marine paint. Following the completion of cleanup activities, the site no longer posed a threat to people and the environment. EPA deleted the site from the NPL in 1988. A private residence and a firewood supply business currently occupy the site.
Updated 2/2013

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Ordnance Products, Inc.

The 95-acre Ordnance Products, Inc. Superfund site is located in the town of North East, Maryland. The site housed a manufacturing plant that produced ordnance products, such as grenade fuses and detonators, from 1960 until 1972. Site operators disposed of wastes from the manufacturing process, including drums of solvents and acids, by burying the waste on site, burning it in open pits or discharging it into five unlined surface impoundments on site. These improper disposal practices resulted in contamination ground water, soil, sediment and sludge on site. Nearby residents rely on ground water as a drinking water source. Investigations found residential wells near the site contaminated with compounds similar to those on site. EPA and the site’s potentially responsible party (PRP) conducted initial removal activities to address surface impoundments and drummed wastes on site during the 1980s and 1990s. The PRP installed treatment systems on impacted residential ground water wells. Following the PRP’s bankruptcy in 1997, EPA took the lead for the site’s cleanup. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1997. EPA continues to maintain the residential well treatment systems. Additionally, EPA conducted cleanup activities to address contaminated soil as well as munitions and explosives of concern during 2010 and 2011. EPA also installed vapor intrusion mitigation systems at two residences in 2012. Currently, EPA is conducting investigations to address ground water contamination. A propane distribution facility and a marine supply company currently operate at the site.
Updated 2/2013

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Southern Maryland Wood Treating Green Infrastructure
Site location map

The Southern Maryland Wood Treating (SMWT) Superfund site is located in Hollywood, Maryland. Wetlands cover most of the 94-acre site. From 1965 until 1978, wood treating operations took place on 25 acres of the site. These activities resulted in contamination of soil, ground water and a stream adjacent to the site. In the early 1980s, site owners abandoned the site property. The site owners left processing equipment and deteriorating containers of chemicals on the property. The unaddressed, ongoing contamination, in addition to the proximity of the site to residential wells, led EPA to place the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1986. EPA excavated and removed more than 270,000 tons of creosote-soaked soil and sediment and treated the excavated materials with thermal desorption to remove hazardous substances. EPA cleaned up soil to residential standards, so future use of the site is not restricted. In 2000, EPA re-graded the site and planted a mix of wildflowers and grains to re-establish the site as a wildlife habitat. EPA completed re-grading and re-vegetation in 2001. Ground water monitoring ended in 2003. In 2004, the site became the first Superfund site to attain a Ready for Reuse determination. Since the site achieved all cleanup levels established in the cleanup plan, EPA removed the site from the NPL in 2005. Once parties address private lien foreclosure rights on the site property, local stakeholders and government entities will determine the most appropriate future use of the site.
Updated 2/2013

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Woodlawn County Landfill Green Infrastructure

The 37-acre Woodlawn County Landfill Superfund site is located in Cecil County, Maryland. The site operated as a sand and gravel quarry before Cecil County purchased it in 1960. The county operated a municipal landfill at the site from 1960 until 1978, when the site stopped accepting municipal waste. Between 1978 and 1981, the landfill accepted polyvinyl chloride (PVC) industrial sludge. Waste disposal operations resulted in the contamination of ground water and soil. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1987. Under EPA oversight, the site’s potentially responsible parties (PRPs) conducted the cleanup. Cleanup activities, completed in 2001, included construction of a vegetative soil cover over the landfilled wastes, monitored natural attenuation of ground water and continued surface water monitoring. The PRPs constructed the vegetative soil cover to support wildlife habitat and to continue to maintain the area as "New Beginnings, the Woodlawn Wildlife Habitat Area”. Local schools, the Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts of America, and the local community use the site for nature and science projects, environmental education and recreation. Long-term maintenance and monitoring continue at the site and indicates that the extent of the ground water contamination continues to decrease.
Updated 2/2013

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