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Sites in Reuse in Alabama

Alabama Army Ammunition Plant Green Infrastructure
Site photo

The 13,233-acre Alabama Army Ammunition Plant (AAAP) Superfund site is located in Childersburg, Alabama. A government-owned, contractor-operated facility produced acids and powder explosives at the site during World War II. Facility operators dumped spent acids into unlined ditches on site. In 1945, the federal government leased portions of the property to several companies, including the Tennessee Copper Corporation, the Beaunit Corporation and the Olin Mathieson Chemical Corporation. These firms continued producing various chemical products on site. The U.S. Army inspected portions of the AAAP in 1978, and reported visible contamination of soil and ground water. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in July 1987. The cleanup, conducted between 1994 and 1997, involved removing and treating contaminated soil and filling excavated areas with fresh soils. The U.S. Army also created a lined landfill to contain thermally treated and stabilized ash, soil, and clay pipe. Ground water cleanup continues. Today, privately owned portions of the plant’s former storage area are used for logging, hunting and as a wildlife preserve. In 2003, the U.S. Army transferred ownership of the former manufacturing area to the Childersburg Local Redevelopment Authority. The City plans to develop industrial and commercial facilities on site. NuSteel, a steel fabricating business, and Nippon Oil Lubricants currently operate at the site. Blair Block, a cinder block manufacturer and Resolute Forest Products, a paper mill, also currently operate on the site.
Updated 10/2013

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Capitol City Ground Water Plume
Site photo

The Capitol City Plume site, located in Montgomery, Alabama, includes an area of ground water contamination near the city’s well field. EPA proposed the site for listing on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 2000 due to contaminated ground water and soil throughout the western downtown Montgomery area. Primary contaminants of concern include trichloroethylene (TCE) and perchloroethylene (PCE), chemicals commonly used in dry cleaning and cleaning of machine parts. The City is working closely with EPA to facilitate the site’s cleanup and work is ongoing to assess the ground water contamination and develop the site’s cleanup plan. The City used EPA Pilot funds to fully investigate reuse options and coordinate with EPA on the site’s future land use. The City is also in the process of integrating the site’s reuse plan with the City’s master plan for riverfront development. Riverfront redevelopment has already helped transform a mismatched assortment of commercial and open space uses into the downtown’s new Riverfront Amphitheater and Conference Complex. Downtown Montgomery remains open for business during the site’s ground water cleanup. Land uses include retail districts, neighborhoods, parks, offices and industrial areas. The revitalization of Montgomery’s downtown is a major community priority. Referred to as the “heart of the city”, recent Montgomery redevelopment projects include the Montgomery Biscuits minor league baseball stadium, retail centers, downtown apartments and restaurants. Much of the site area above ground remains in continued use.
Updated 1/2013

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Triana/Tennessee River Green Infrastructure
Site photo

The Triana/Tennessee Superfund site is located in Huntsville, Alabama. From 1947 until 1970, the Olin Corporation operated a pesticide manufacturing plant on site. The company discharged plant wastewater into Huntsville Spring Branch. Waste handling practices at the site resulted in contamination of soil, sediment, surface water and fish tissue. The site includes an 11-mile stretch of the Huntsville Spring Branch and Indian Creek tributaries of the Tennessee River. The tributaries flow into the Tennessee River near Triana, Alabama. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Cleanup activities included burying contaminated material in the old channel, digging a new channel and constructing structures to prevent the stream from flowing to the former channel. EPA, the Alabama Department of Environmental Management and Olin Corporation continue to monitor fish tissue, surface water and sediment. The site is located completely within the Wheeler National Wildlife Refuge and the Redstone Arsenal. Created in 1938, the Refuge provides critical habitat for migratory birds, as well as many non-migratory species. The Arsenal is home to the U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Command and other defense-related agencies.
Updated 10/2013

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